Jump to content

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)
Loren

Spark Plug Change Instructions

Recommended Posts

Gents, I'm new here & a 1st time Porsche owner. What i have recently acquired is a 1999 Porsche 911 Carrera with the factory AeroKit. This is a US model & it has been shipped here to Manila, Philippines brand new way back in 2000. The car is now at 9,407miles & I would like to use NGK BKR6-EK spark plugs on its 10,000mile service. Would these plugs run well with the car? I'm just concerned of the weather we have here in Manila.

Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone have any experience with the NGK plugs on the 911? I've used them in all of my other cars and usually try to stay away from bosch. Any input appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone have any experience with the NGK plugs on the 911? I've used them in all of my other cars and usually try to stay away from bosch. Any input appreciated.

:welcome:

Please do a search - spark plug debates have been discussed here ad nauseam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished my spark 3rd spark plug job on this car. First try took me 6 hours, second try took me 4 hours, third try took me 2.5 hours so I wanted to share some tips on how to speed up the process (I did not have to remove the bumper or the exhaust)

ATTACHED IS THE PHOT OF THE TOOLS I USED:

- the wrench is used with conjunction of the 5mm bit, the closed end turns so it works like a rachet (this combination allows you to get into the tight spaces)

- the grease is for lubing up the spark plug so it wouldn't get stuck in your spark plug when you're taking it out

- the long extension is for reaching the 2 plugs on the left and right side of the car closest to the wheel

- the 2 mini extensions is for you to get to the other 4 hard to reach plugs, put the spark plug socket and the extension in first and then attach the 2nd extension and finally the rachet

- the 10 mm socket was used to remove the heat shield

TIPS

- only the rear needs to be jacked up to access the spark plugs

- the spark plug closest to the rear end of the car on the DRIVER'S SIDE can be reached through the exhaust gap at the rear of the car

- if you can not get your hand at the proper angle to loosen the screws or gain leverage try positioning your body at a different angle underneath the car (ie instead of vertical, try horizontal in relation to the car)

- make sure you double check all wire connectors connecting to the coils to ensure the wire is secure and COMPLETELY on

- check to ensure all the spark plugs are the correct model before installing

PROBLEMS

- do not over lube your spark plug, just use enough lube so it doesn't get stuck to the spark plug socket

- ROTTEN EGG SMELL, MISFIRE, I ran into this issue after replacing the spark plugs and I ended up redoing the whole spark plug job to fix it, I probably did not connect a wire properly to the coil

- MORE VIBRATION THEN NORMAL, again check the spark plug wire to the coil to make sure it's secured

I hope these tips are imformative! Please feel free to email me or msg me on AIM if you have any questions. GOOD LUCK!!!

post-20705-0-30555200-1290854783_thumb.j

Edited by roastduck88

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did a spark plug and coil pack change over the weekend, so I will add my 2 cents.

Remove the mufflers.

Remove the mufflers.

Did I mention remove the mufflers. They are so easy to take off and provide so much more space to work. It made the front and rear plugs so easy to change it was a joke.

The middle plug on each side was harder. The muffler bracket blocks easy access. I had to feed the extension at an angle around the bracket and then attach it to the socket, which I had already lined up in the hole.

Make sure you connections are secure to your coil packs. I found one that wasn't quite tight. They will "click" once secure, but sometimes you can't tell for sure, so triple check.

I didn't use any grease on the plugs and had no issue. The thought of putting grease on plugs freaks me out - probably for no good reason.

The job took about 3.5 hrs. Next time could probably do it in 2.5.

Remove the mufflers.

Good luck!

Adam

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just completed my first DIY plug change on my 2002 C2 Cab. The job was sometimes frustrating but the satisfaction of firing up the car when I was done, with a smoothly purring engine and no CEL, was top drawer.

A few lessons learned:

* +1 on removing the mufflers, which I was going to do anyway since I was replacing the stock units with aftermarket AWE cans.

* Using two 2-inch extensions was easier than using one 4-inch extension for several plugs. If I were buying tools just for this job I'd get just the two 2-inchers.

* The rearmost passenger-side coil pack upper cap screw was a royal pain until I decided to remove the heat shielding; it was then a breeze to remove with a 5mm allen key socket on a 2-inch extension

* Use a normal 5/8" spark plug socket (with rubber insert) for removing plugs, but a normal deep 5/8" socket (no rubber insert) for installing the new ones. This prevents the extension separating from the socket when trying to pull the socket loose, due to the rubber gripping the plug tightly. (I don't like the idea of using grease, even dielectric grease, on electrical parts when I can avoid it.)

The accumulated knowledge in this thread is priceless, and gave me the confidence to tackle this job myself. Thanks all. :thankyou:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do yourself a favor and pick up one of these little helpers. works awesome for getting the bolts out of the coils. also great for interior screws in tight places.

I just finished, and agree that this tool makes the job easier for the 5mm allen bolts. Another tip is to use the correct length ratchet on the 3 muffler bolts. Those were difficult to reach with my Craftsman 3/8" drive ratchet (especially the rearmost one), so I made a small (4"ish) breaker bar / extension.

The only problem I had was one of my exhaust clamp bolts sheared off, despite being soaked with PB Blaster. No big deal though, I will get a new one from Ace or maybe the stealership.

Also, it's kind of funny how I've read about a few people getting the plug socket stuck, then having to fish it out. My roughly 20 year old socket from Sears worked great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the middle of replacing my plugs and coils. I'm going to remove the mufflers before doing the rear ones, thanks for the tips guys.

Before I continue I would like to ask you about the coils. I noticed that in the directions I've found here on RennTech it is stated that one must push on the coil while threading the fastening screws all the way in. My wonder is that there is no clicking sound when the coil engages the spark plug and the coil does not "sit" on the mounting surface but "hangs" (or is pushed out by the rubber tube encapsulating the spark plug) about 2-3 mm away but are easily pushed in to make it sit in all the way. Is this normal?

This is my first Porsche spark plug change but I've done this job many many times on different types of cars and both with individual ignition coils on the spark plugs and the traditional ignition-wire snap on. Doing these repairs (other than my Porsche) there has always been the clicking sound when the coils and the wires connect or snap on to the spark plugs.

Regards.

Matti...

Ps. I'll tripple check the coil connectors ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm new to the forum and wanted to thank everyone for the excellent instructions and tips! I successfully managed to remove all 6 plugs on my 2003 996 (with 54k miles) pretty easily thanks to all the advice. I already had my mufflers out (getting the Fister D mod) so I decided to give this a try. The plugs I removed were Beru 14-FGR 6 KQU, not sure if these were the original plugs (which I see are no longer recommended) or if a previous owner put the wrong plugs in as they look pretty trashed (althought the car seemed to have been running fine, just a bit of vibration at idle). At any rate- I'm replacing with the recommended Bosch FGR5's, The box shows 28nm (20.65 ft lbs), however the manual (and DIY) shows 22 ft lbs, obviously not a big difference, but which is correct? Is the 22 ft lbs based on the old plug spec? All of my coils had cracks, so I'm waiting for the new ones (Beru oem replacement from Pelican was much cheaper vs oem), I see the coils now have a 997 part #, wonder if they are now designed better (less prone to cracking)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your torque wrench prob has more deg of error than 1ft lb so I wouldnt sweat the discrepancy.

As for the part num. Sometimes the newer parts are better and sometimes its the same part but from a different. Mfg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm new to the forum and wanted to thank everyone for the excellent instructions and tips! I successfully managed to remove all 6 plugs on my 2003 996 (with 54k miles) pretty easily thanks to all the advice. I already had my mufflers out (getting the Fister D mod) so I decided to give this a try. The plugs I removed were Beru 14-FGR 6 KQU, not sure if these were the original plugs (which I see are no longer recommended) or if a previous owner put the wrong plugs in as they look pretty trashed (althought the car seemed to have been running fine, just a bit of vibration at idle). At any rate- I'm replacing with the recommended Bosch FGR5's, The box shows 28nm (20.65 ft lbs), however the manual (and DIY) shows 22 ft lbs, obviously not a big difference, but which is correct? Is the 22 ft lbs based on the old plug spec? All of my coils had cracks, so I'm waiting for the new ones (Beru oem replacement from Pelican was much cheaper vs oem), I see the coils now have a 997 part #, wonder if they are now designed better (less prone to cracking)?

Yes, for MY2003 those were the wrong plugs (or perhaps never changed).

The correct plugs are FGR 5 KQE0.

Yes, 22 ftlb. is correct for new plugs - with no anti-seize. If you were removing the plugs and re-using them then it would be 18.5 ftlb.

I think the new 997 coils are better - but you need to remember that your car is almost 10 years old and plastic parts are going to be getting brittle and break.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your torque wrench prob has more deg of error than 1ft lb so I wouldnt sweat the discrepancy.

Good point, I noticed my new digital torque wrench (and most others) are accurate within 4%, but only at > or = 20% of capacity- so a mute point I suppose.

Yes, for MY2003 those were the wrong plugs (or perhaps never changed).

The correct plugs are FGR 5 KQE0.

Yes, 22 ftlb. is correct for new plugs - with no anti-seize. If you were removing the plugs and re-using them then it would be 18.5 ftlb.

I think the new 997 coils are better - but you need to remember that your car is almost 10 years old and plastic parts are going to be getting brittle and break.

Thanks Loren... I'm pretty sure the plugs were never changed, so the Beru's must've been the original plugs installed at the factory. I guess Porsche had issues with them (didn't see details of the TSB)?

So 22 ftlb. is the Porsche spec and the 28 nm is Bosch (suggested) torque?

In regard to the coils, it made sense to replace them now since I'm this far along. Curious what ill-effects the cracked coil could cause? When putting them back in, do I just push as far as they go and snug to 7.5 ftlb., or should I kind of twist to the R then back to make sure they are seated all the way (noticed they have spring action inside).

Thanks again guys, great info on this site and you guys are like the Porsche Yoda's!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So 22 ftlb. is the Porsche spec and the 28 nm is Bosch (suggested) torque?

22 ftlb or 30 Nm per the service manual (last update 2006).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
what ill-effects the cracked coil could cause?

Cracked coils can cause hestiations and misfires, especially if they are wet ot damp.

When putting them back in, do I just push as far as they go and snug to 7.5 ftlb.

Yes, don't force them. No need to twist them. They just need to be fully seated which is very difficult not to do, and do observe the tigentning specs on the coil pack bolts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again guys.

I'm assuming since the plugs are a multi-ground type they don't need to be gapped, just inspected to make sure the electodes weren't damanged duing shipping, etc.?

Any other suggestions of things to replace while I'm in the area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since yours is a 2003 car there are no spark tubes to change, so I would just do the plugs and replace any coils that are cracked or don't pass the resistance tests.

As for gapping the plugs you shouldn't need to gap them if they are multi ground, but they should be checked to ensure they were manufacturered correctly.

I'm not sure how you could bend the prong on a multi ground plug to set the gap (I've tried and only ended up ruining a plug). So if it is not set correctly from the factory it should be replaced with another new one. If it is single ground absolutley you need to gap them properly.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since yours is a 2003 car there are no spark tubes to change, so I would just do the plugs and replace any coils that are cracked or don't pass the resistance tests.

As for gapping the plugs you shouldn't need to gap them if they are multi ground, but they should be checked to ensure they were manufacturered correctly.

I'm not sure how you could bend the prong on a multi ground plug to set the gap (I've tried and only ended up ruining a plug). So if it is not set correctly from the factory it should be replaced with another new one. If it is single ground absolutley you need to gap them properly.

Thanks, I went ahead and ordered all new coils to be certain. I also noticed that my coolant overflow drain tube was aimed directly at the #1 coil which had the most cracks, I ordered the new design cap but wonder where the drain hose should be directed (or if it is supposed to clip onto something)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my overflow tube pointed more towards the center of the car on top of the exhaust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my new coils and managed to put everything back together, and torque everything to spec -thanks again for the help! I started the car up and let it idle for a couple of minutes, no CEL and seems to run fine.

Now that I'm done, I am questioning the torque wrench I used and I'm concerned about it's calibration and possibly over-tightening the plugs! The wrench I used (like another one I have) the "0" on the handle doesn't line up with the hash marks on the wrench, for example @ 20 ft lb, it was about 7 ft lb shy, so I had to turn the handle to increase by 7 ft lb to get it to line up with the hash mark to "now" be at 20 ft lb, so technically it was reading 29 ft lb. (I tested this vs a new digital one I got as comparion and that seemed to be the correct setting) and I didn't feel like I was over-tightening really, but it was hard to tell. Should I be concerned? Would the (possible) extra 7 ft lbs be of real concern? To be safe should I loosen the plugs and then re-torque when I'm sure my wrench is working properly? If I do re-torque, would I then do the 18.5 ft lb even though the car wasn't driven? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be a little careful with new digital torque wrenches. Most are +- 4% at 30 ftlb and above -- and +- 7% below 30 ftlb.

For engine parts I am happy to stick with my 30 year old (but often calibrated) Proto torque wrench +- less than 3%.

The plugs just might be a little harder to get out the next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be a little careful with new digital torque wrenches. Most are +- 4% at 30 ftlb and above -- and +- 7% below 30 ftlb.

For engine parts I am happy to stick with my 30 year old (but often calibrated) Proto torque wrench +- less than 3%.

The plugs just might be a little harder to get out the next time.

Thanks, so do you think I'm better leaving well enough alone- even given that they might be 7 ft lb too tight (not sure how much 7 ft lb equates to, maybe 1/4 turn)? The original 10yr old plugs I removed were in there really tight! Given the ambigious torque wrench settings, I'm afraid to do more harm than good by loosening and re-torquing, even if I can verify the calibration. I should've splurged for a quality torque wrench that I too can keep for 30 years!

Edited by Chad_Pgh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes leave well enough alone, i'm sure it's fine.

I've torqued the p-car prob as much as 25ft lbs and never a problem.

You would know if you had a problem if you stripped a thread. Then the head would have to come off. !!!!! :)

If you look at the instructions for the plugs it actually has a degree angle measurement you are supposed to follow, and how accurate do you think that is? (actually more accurate if you have a degree angle measurement device, but I think most people just say "aaaahhhhh good enough")

I do the plugs in my boat by feel and I've never had a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes leave well enough alone, i'm sure it's fine.

I've torqued the p-car prob as much as 25ft lbs and never a problem.

You would know if you had a problem if you stripped a thread. Then the head would have to come off. !!!!! :)

If you look at the instructions for the plugs it actually has a degree angle measurement you are supposed to follow, and how accurate do you think that is? (actually more accurate if you have a degree angle measurement device, but I think most people just say "aaaahhhhh good enough")

I do the plugs in my boat by feel and I've never had a problem.

Thanks, that makes me feel better about the job. I re-checked the torque wrench I used against another one I have and feel more confident that the setting was close. I guess if I were off by 20 ft lb or stripped the threads as you mentioned I'd know it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you who have a hard time getting to cylinder 1 and 4 plugs! I followed Loren's instructions and was able to change my plugs. However, getting to plugs of cylinders 1 and 4 was pain #@??)*... but I got it. The second time I had to do this I removed the mufflers. This gave me a lot of room to work with and made the job a lot easier for me. Took me about 20 min to take both mufflers off the car. Just loosen the bracket on the cat side and the 3 13mm nuts holding the muffler to the engine support bracket (see pic). You don't really have to do this, but if you have big hands and a only small collection of extensions and universals this will help you a lot. Good luck. attachicon.gifmuffler.png

I can't wrap my head around how to remove the muffler. I will be doing my plugs and coils this weekend. (had the PO306 code thrown) hope it's just the coils and plugs.. #6 that i could see with the wheel off looked pretty rough, part of the plastic came off in my hand.

Is there a good muffler removal tutorial?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.