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Spark Plug Change Instructions


Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 6 ea 999 170 195 90 Spark Plugs (Beru 14FR 6LDU) Tools you will need: Jack 19 mm socket for wheel bolts, 10 mm, 13 mm sockets, 5 or 6 mm hex socket 5/8" spark plug socket 3/8" ratchet and 12" and 6" extension, u-joint Medium phillips screwdriver #25, 27, 40 torx socket drivers Torque wrench Spark Plug Removal Prep 1. Jack up car, put stand

 

Edited by ebaker
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  • 1 year later...
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  • 1 year later...

I used the Bosch FR6 plugs (preferred by many), replace any coils if they look suspect (about $50 a piece).

Took me about 5 hrs too, I'd say more tedious than difficult. Some pictures .

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post-2465-1211604279_thumb.jpg

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post-2465-1211604327_thumb.jpg

Edited by Danyol
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  • 4 weeks later...

Just did this over the weekend- with a bunch of other things. (Exhaust, new wastegates, diverters) Why do plugs? Car had 23k miles, stock plugs. I had a mild ‘stumble’ on occasion when backing off light acceleration at 3k or so. I had one misfire once that set a CEL. I cleared it and it never returned- still, a indication of hat was to come I think. Considering that I am adding boost, it was clearly necessary.

First post is really very, very good. A couple of added notes:

My rear bumper was held with a 6mm allen bolt, not a T40 torx. 2004. I've seen torx before (on other cars) so this surprised me. When re-installing the bumpers, you need to align them to the side a bit and hold them while tightening, to get the right fit.

Once the muffler was off, I took off the intercoolers on both sides and also removed the heat shields. These are real easy once the muffler is off. (Conversely, the upper nuts on the heat shield are a total pain once the exhaust is installed. The OP had a good point to gently bend them, but I couldn't bring myself to that- plus my exhaust was off to ne swapped anyway.

They are ‘easy, easy’ once all that stuff is off (bumper, exhaust, intercoolers). Couple of heat shields, a bit of twisting to get the coils out. DO MAKE SURE that the electrical connectors to the coil packs are snug, they can back off as you are manipulating them out from the plug holes. I did not use anti-sieze this time. I’ve seen it recommended, but not by Porsche. (I believe the root is cold start issues in very cold climates. That is not a problem for me.) Next time I will use some, just a wetting of the threads, minimal thickness, and keep it away from the spark end. (ie don’t do the last few threads by the business end)

Tedious but not difficult. The bumper skin was the biggest challenge only because you need two people to avoid damaging the paint.

A

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  • 1 month later...
  • Admin

Only change I would make to ebaker's excellent DIY is in step 6.

It is not necessary to remove the center heat shield - just the two screws on each end. This will allow you enough room to slide the intercooler forward and out.

This would also be a good time to inspect and or replace old intercooler hoses. If they are soft and easily collapse then you are going to need them soon anyway.

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Loren speaks from personal knowledge. Yesterday "we" changed out the plugs on my 02 996TT....and Loren used the DIY writeup to perform the step-by-step procedures....and like he noted, we both looked at the center bumper heat shield and other than the two screws on the opposite ends....couldn't figure out why you had to take off the whole enchilada.

Also...I didn't get the top right (passenger's side) intercooler hose properly into the intercooler....my bad...and on the way home, I noticed that even slightly putting the gas to it would register boost....so I was careful not to go WOT...but alas, in passing a car, I heard it blow off. I had visions of having to take everything off again to get the intercooler hose back into place, but stopped at a friend's shop (Ron Kain of IPB for you folks in the Sacramento CA area). Ron took a quick look at it and immediately saw that the hose had blown off....all he did was take the hose completely out by lifting up on the wire circlips...this mean wrestling it....or neurosurgery with a hammer....then he put a little lube on both of the metal ends on the hose, especially the side with the green O ring, and wrestled it back into place until the audible CLICK could be heard as the wire circlips grabbed the notches. He yanked hard on the hose to make sure it was securely in place then smiled and said...You're good to go. So if you have any problems on the re-install and blow a hose off...you don't have to take everything off again to get to the intercooler .....just muscle it in. I find that I'm too much of a tenderfoot when it comes to wrestling things around....no need to put on kid gloves to do a lot of the projects....I usually spend way too much time trying to be overly careful not to break something...too much finesse'....not enough progress.

Also.....Loren had a great idea...as we took the plugs out of their respective cylinders, we took a magic marker and numbered the plugs as well as the box they went in. This gives you the ability to later inspect each plug, or have a more knowledgeable person do so and comment on the "health" of the individual cylinders insofar as the color and condition of the plugs will tell you.

Publicly, I'd like to thank Loren for getting me thru the DIY plug change....I am being overly complimentary to myself when I said that "we" had changed the plugs....Loren did most of it.

Oh...another thing...you really dont need to take off those aluminum foil looking side heat shields in front of the coil packs...again, not for the faint of heart, but just bend them up on the sides then back down again when you're done....you'll never see the crease or be able to tell they were bent up....much quicker than taking them off.

Edited by Chuck Jones
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I changed my spark plugs yesterday after thinking about it for a long time. Thanks to everyone who wrote and added comments to the DIY Spark Plug Change Instructions, it was almost foolproof. After spending a Saturday changing plugs and detailing my car, it runs great. One comment, Take the advise on #5 and get a helper to take off and reinstall the bumper cover.

Thanks,

Joel

Edited by jsmith996tt
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  • 3 months later...
  • Admin

Another addition here when changing the spark plugs.

Check the condition of the cam solenoid brackets (1 per side) - item 27 in diagram below.

post-1-1226853081_thumb.png

There have a few instances where these brackets crack or break and cause intermittent fault codes on the 3 cylinders on the cracked side.

Thanks to the folks on Rennlist that found this one.

post-1-1226853085_thumb.jpg

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  • 2 months later...
Another addition here when changing the spark plugs.

Check the condition of the cam solenoid brackets (1 per side) - item 27 in diagram below.

post-1-1226853081_thumb.png

There have a few instances where these brackets crack or break and cause intermittent fault codes on the 3 cylinders on the cracked side.

Thanks to the folks on Rennlist that found this one.

post-1-1226853085_thumb.jpg

Loren,

do you have to take off the valve cover to get to that piece?

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Another addition here when changing the spark plugs.

Check the condition of the cam solenoid brackets (1 per side) - item 27 in diagram below.

post-1-1226853081_thumb.png

There have a few instances where these brackets crack or break and cause intermittent fault codes on the 3 cylinders on the cracked side.

Thanks to the folks on Rennlist that found this one.

post-1-1226853085_thumb.jpg

Loren,

do you have to take off the valve cover to get to that piece?

No, just the heat shield.

post-1-1234211034_thumb.jpg

(photo courtesy John D II on Rennlist)

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

hi Loren

just a question do you know if it's the same procedure as in cayenne S 2004

if you know what kind of tools do i need thanks

and also i have the cylinder 4 misfire , i don't have CEL so could you please indicate me where is cylinder for

thanks

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hi Loren

just a question do you know if it's the same procedure as in cayenne S 2004

if you know what kind of tools do i need thanks

and also i have the cylinder 4 misfire , i don't have CEL so could you please indicate me where is cylinder for

thanks

This thread is for 996 TT - so no it not the same.

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  • 2 months later...
Oh...another thing...you really dont need to take off those aluminum foil looking side heat shields in front of the coil packs...again, not for the faint of heart, but just bend them up on the sides then back down again when you're done....you'll never see the crease or be able to tell they were bent up....much quicker than taking them off.

Big thanks to Loren, ebaker & Chuck for the write-up and comments.

A couple thoughts from my 2003 TTx50. I removed the bumper support (the piece with the brackets for the bumperettes) and its attached heat shield. Four bolts, so why not. Also, the heat shield above the bumper support is attached with 4 easy nuts. If those heat shields are removed, the side heat shields are easier to bend out of the way without mis-shaping 3 layers of shield. One other hint - I replaced the air filter too since the upper passenger side intercooler hose is easier to access with the air filter housing removed. Luckily, I had one on the shelf.

For future search results, here's why I attempted the coil pack & plug replacement.

I had a miss (misfire, stumbling, hesitation) at WOT at high rpms. It happened a couple times with no CEL, but then the dreaded flashing CEL came on (P0301, IIRC). The "drive to the dealer" message showed up, but the CEL cleared itself after a few miles of sane driving. The stored fault was a single misfire on cylinder 5. My local dealer said they couldn't replicate the problem; it happened every time I drove the car hard. :huh: I might be looking for another shop when the warranty is up in December.

Their refusal to really diagnose the problem emboldened me to tackle the project. Since the car has 43,500 miles and is my daily driver, I decided to change all the coil packs and plugs at once.

+1 on checking to make sure the coil pack wires *click* into place. I thought I had all 6 firm, but as soon as I fired it up I knew I was missing at least 1 cylinder. I discovered that AFTER complete re-assembly.

The next day I tore everything back apart and found the culprit. A hint is to slide each rubber boot off the coil pack connector to visually ensure the connection is solid.

It sure is refreshing to have all 450 horses back on board!!!

Steve DeVinney

Atlanta, GA

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  • 9 months later...

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