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    Loren

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/04/2010 in all areas

  1. Does anybody has this problem with their horns? Basically, if I go over a bump, or stop on a slope, the horn will turn on. It is very annoying especially people in front of you thought your are hornking at them. Any advise, will be helpful. Thanks, -Nat
    31 points
  2. This is a continuation from the front wheel bearing change. That was good practice for the rear of your car. Although i thought the rear was more difficult than the front but after i was done and found a couple of tricks that i will share, it might actually be easier. Having the right tools always make things go smoother. The B90-P2 tool i bought at http://www.samstagsales.com/Porsche.htm#axle Took only 3 days to get it. I was away at work for 4 days so the timing was perfect. Great service. Earlier this year people were wondering where to get the tools to take apart the electrical conn
    30 points
  3. Finally got around to doing the front wheel bearings on my 1999 Boxster. I bought the SIR Tools B-90 P2 kit. $259.00 Bearing seperator from China Freight $29.99 (ON Sale) Craftsman 32mm large socket. $11.99 4 foot bar extension or pipe. (Home Depot $10) Bearings from, I can't remember but a while back. $30ea Jack Stands Jack Important Anti Seize Compound $8.99 (NAPA) Large wrench set. Sears $59.99 (I kinda went overboard on the wrenches. They had them on sale and even thought Craftsman is a lot more than China freight they treat their employees well, i think they are made in the USA
    28 points
  4. It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside do
    25 points
  5. First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution will work but obviously the problem remains and at some point you may end up stranded if the ignitio
    25 points
  6. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 6 ea 999 170 207 91 Spark Plugs (Beru 14FGR 6KQU) MY99-MY01 or 6 ea 999 170 223 90 Spark Plugs (Beru FGR 5KQE0) MY02 Tools you will need: Jack 19 mm socket for wheel bolts Snap-On S9706 Spark Plug Socket Snap-On FXW4 (4 inch) Extension (or any 3/8" drive extension that allows at least 16 degrees of offcenter movement) 3/8" Ratchet 5 mm hex allen socket or 5 mm allen wrench Torque wrench Note: Most find that
    22 points
  7. I recently replaced the coolant pipes in my car. I needed to do the job myself because there was simply no way I was going to shell out anywhere from $1500 to $3500 in labor to have it done by the dealership or an independent shop. Plus, having read about the job, I knew they would be tearing through a ton of stuff and I really feared the "oh, it also needs this" scam. I did a LOT of research on the various forums before undertaking this job. Reading and printing out anything I thought was useful information. I would highly encourage anyone reading this to do the same. Fortunately, I
    16 points
  8. I like pictures when I read a DIY, so I made these up to demonstrate what you are in for when you want to change your plugs. Use these pictures in conjunction with the writeup by ebaker...
    14 points
  9. Lacking any comprehensive instructions about how to remove the a-pillar trim to install hidden wiring for radar detector, GPS and XM antennae, I studied the parts book exploded view (not much help), then just gutted up and attacked the problem. My car is a 997 Targa, but the coupe should be similar and the procedure should be approximately the same on either side of the car. In my car, this technique has allowed me to install a GPS receiver antenna and a satellite radio antenna on a fabricated mounting bracket, along with the radar detector, in a location ahead of the rear view mirror wher
    14 points
  10. A simple inexpensive way to get a better sound a tiny performance gain. In the Fabspeed cold air kit $225.00. For my modification visit home depot and get a 2 inch pvc joint, and 2 inch rubber cap. Remove the air box lid and remove the air muffler 3 screws. Take the pvc joint and from the center measure 1.5 inches and cut off the ends. place the rubber cap in one end and place the pipe through the hole of the air box lid, place the small hose on the intake hose to the pvc expose part with the hose clamp and you are done.
    13 points
  11. I recently installed my mObridge Audio device in my Cayenne Turbo, and wanted to share a bit of experience for anyone considering the same path. I opted to do the install up front in case I needed to access the device for firmware updates. The rest of the options for the device are easily relocated, but to use the SD card access for music or for flashing the firmware requires physical access. The best location I found was the panel directly behind the glove box. There is a single black screw holding the black body panel on, and once removed the entire panel drops down with
    12 points
  12. Start by removing the air filter/metering unit. Two clips hold the Air Fuel Meter cable in place. Disconnect AFM connector and set aside.Remove single bolt holding AF assembly (13mm) and tilt unit back to remove. Set aside. Remove 2 bolts and 1 nut (10mm) holding air pump. One nut holds the Coolant Reservoir. Set aside. I used some string to pull it away from CR. Drain antifreeze by means of drain plug at the bottom of engine. Drain just enough to empty CR, then a little more. I used an aluminum turkey tray to hold antifreeze and reuse. Loosen 3 spring clamps holding hoses to CR. T
    12 points
  13. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 1 set 996 352 949 03 Front Brake Pads - Porsche (Pagid "S" Pads - Dark Blue - T5104SRS14) 1 set 996 351 088 01 Front Vibration Dampers for Brake Pads (recommended) 2 ea 996 351 959 00 Front Pad Repair Kit (consisting of 2 bolts, springs and securing clips) 2 sets 996 612 365 00 Front and Rear Wear Sensors (if needed) 1 set 996 352 939 03 Rear Brake Pads - Porsche (Pagid "S" Pads - Dark Blue - T5105SRS14) 1 set 964 352 096 0
    12 points
  14. One of the problems that I see with many 996/986/997/987 owners complaining about is a lumpy or erratic idle and sometimes sluggish acceleration. I have a quick cure for this problem. In fact, this cure will work for any car that has a throttle body. The issue is that over time a sludgy gunk will build up in the throttle body where the throttle butterfly opens and closes. This gunk will eventually change the airflow characteristics of the gap between the butterfly and the throttlebody which will cause the erratic idle. In addition, this gunk can cause the butterfly the stick as it op
    11 points
  15. I have modified the rear storage compartment to handle two (2) 5" subs and two (2) 4" speakers. I will be using Focal speakers, the 5" 13KS subs and a pair or 4" 100CA. The Focal 5" subs are the best sounding subs that I've ever heard. I have spent weeks cutting and shaping this compartment and its finally ready to make the master mold. I will be selling these Rear Speaker/Sub Boxes in the very near future if anyone is interested. They will have a gelcoat finish and I'll make a few colors. I have attached a couple of photo's of the prototype so you can see what it looks like.
    11 points
  16. There have a been a few occurances of the cabrio top not fully completing the cycle, or simply refusing to open or close. If the hand brake light is on, very likely it is a low hydraulic fluid condition. The work below shows step by step how to add the fluid to the system. Tools needed: 5 mm allen wrench Flat screwdriver Children medicine syringe with small hose 1 Bottle of hydraulic fluid. Porsche is the recommended, I have used John Deere below with no problems after 4 weeks of filling: The steps for the process: 1. Open the top partially to the position shown 2. Pull t
    11 points
  17. EDIT: Fixed text boxes to see text better. This is an AOS DIY that walks you through the process of replacing the AOS. This is for a 2000 996 C2 Cab, six speed. I tried to be as thorough as I could in writing the DIY. If there is something left out or lesson learned from your personal experience with the AOS and or this DIY, please let me know so I can incorporate it into the document. Regards, Ken How do you eat an elephant? -- One bite at a time! Air Oil Separator Replacement.pdf
    10 points
  18. I had heard this urban legend that you can repair door dings and dents by rubbing dry ice over the dent and then heating it with a hair dryer or heat gun. It seemed simple enough, so I decided to try it on the wife's urban assault vehicle which has its fair share of door dings. I went over to our neighborhood grocery store and got 2 pounds of dry ice for $3. Here is the what the test door looked like before the test. Essentially the process is to take some dry ice (while wearing gloves, as it is very, very cold), and simply run the dry ice back and forth over the dent until the metal has c
    10 points
  19. I am posting some notes as to my process in removing the rear half axles from my 2000 Boxster S, and replacing the CV Joint “Boots”, both inner and outer. I hope this will be of use to folks, and I want to acknowledge the good assistance from those on this Board who helped along the way: Note: For tools, you will need a large torque wrench. I bought mine from Harbor Freight for $79.00. I’d highly recommend not only that wrench, but a good set of metric wrenches and sockets, a NAPA CV Boot clamp tool, and a good set of snap ring or “circlip” pliers. I'd also suggest a ball joint separator tool
    10 points
  20. The credit for this goes to Kendo on 986forum, but I thought it might be worth posting in the DIY section here. I tried it and it worked for me. Kendo: For those that have just had the tactile switch fail and want to replace it it can be found at Mouser Electronics for $0.60 each. Tactile switch The item you want is figure "C" 101-TF25R-EV (at least this is true for the three button key FOB head on my 2004 key). I used the 400 gf switch for my failed unlock button, but comparing the operating force to the stock switches I think 300 gf would be closer to correct. BTW the description say
    10 points
  21. Porsche Integrated Workshop Information System - Technical Service Information. Manuals, Service Bulletins, and Service Information Books - Subscription Required.
    10 points
  22. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Edit - July 25, 2006 - Updated the clutch bleeding procedure to the latest procedure as outlined in supplement 98 of the Carrera Service Manual - Loren) Parts you will need: 1 liter (minimum) 000 043 203 66 Porsche DOT 4 Brake Fluid or equal (ATE Gold or ATE Super Blue) Tools you will need: Jack 19 mm socket for wheel bolts Motive Power Bleeder (or equal) image Needle Nose Pliers 11 mm wrench for brakes; 9 mm for clutch slave (sizes var
    10 points
  23. Courtesy of Nasa Racer Pete (used with his permission) - posted by Loren Well, there I was...backing into a parking space against a curb and I was in a hurry and I heard it...SCRAPE! One fraction of a second...barely moving. Got out and looked at the rim...OOOOOOWWWWW! Well, no need to fear...I've done this enough times to have a easy way to do home repairs with a few simple items. Note that this ONLY covers light scuffs, this isn't meant to be used to repair a DAMAGED wheel or one where the scuffs cause significant damage to the rim. This is only for those annoying superficial scuff
    10 points
  24. This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time:
    9 points
  25. Covers all Carrera, and GT3 cars Removal -- 1. You will need to lift the car high enough that you can safely get underneath (you do not need to remove the rear wheels on most cars but most folks find it easier with the rear wheels off). 2. Loosen the 2 bolts (each side) on the sleeve that connects to the cats and then slide it towards the cat. (You might want to spray these nuts with WD40 first so they will loosen easier -- just don't spray the O2 sensors). 3. Crawl under the car and remove the 3 bolts that hold the muffler mounting bracket and the muffler in place. T
    9 points
  26. I read other threads regarding removal of the Cup Holders. Haven't seen one with pics, so I took a few shots and hope can help a bit... I hate these Cup Holders... They feel sticky most of the time, but it's part of their construction... This is part of what I did recently (15 Sep 2010). Hope it helps and it's just a guide and 1st post. I'm no expert, so work safe and with patience... So Pics are: 1, 2 3, 4 and so on... Pic #1 - Front Console [a.k.a. Horse Shoe]. Pic #2 - Insert something plastic at the bottom and pull . Pic #3 - Pull and twist to the left [You'll do the same with ri
    9 points
  27. The symptoms for this include CEL and Long Cranking times when starting after filling up. Part Required 948 110 202 01 (75 from dealer, 45 from Sunset) Some new Twist locks for the trim panels, since they have a mind of their own. You will need to remove the throttle design cover pull up it comes right off. then you will need to remove the 4 t 30 torx screws on the drivers side coil cover. then that cover will pull up although it is a pain, you can wiggle it out. Use a large flat blade screw driver or a penny to remove the 1/4 twist locks that hold down the drivers side engine compartment
    9 points
  28. by drpaulmarsh, Ryan Hanson & Hans Wiederrich Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Front Strut Removal and Installation: 1. Loosen lug nuts slightly and block rear wheels. 2. Remove the shroud on the trunk with a torx screwdriver. 3. Mark the location of the three (3) 13 mm bolts on the top of the trunk that holds the strut to the body with a ink pen. 4. Jack up the car and remove the wheels. 5. Loosen the 18 mm sway bar bolt that is on the bottom of the strut (counter
    9 points
  29. I had been getting a flashing temperature light in my MY99 Boxster when I first started the car in the morning. If I turned the car off and then restarted it, it would go away. I took it in to the dealer for 45k mile service and told them about the flashing light. The service rep said it was probably a crack in the overflow reservoir. He said the sensor is sensitive enough that the light would come on if the car sensed ANY loss of coolant and that a leak from a hairline crack was enough to trigger the light to flash. He said I may or may not see any fluid on the ground because any leak r
    9 points
  30. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 3-4 liters 999 917 546 00 (Shell) Shell Transaxle (75W-90) or Mobil Mobilube PTX (75W-90) Approved Manual Transmission Oils 000 043 204 20 Mobil (Mobilube PTX) - 20 liter container 000 043 204 19 Shell (Transaxle) - 20 liter container 999 917 546 00 Shell (Transaxle) - 1 liter container Note: All are synthetic GL4 and GL5 rated (or "non-conventional processing") oils. GL oils have good light running properties because of their
    8 points
  31. I got sick of not having cupholders in my Boxster. So I set out to find some. The options seemed to be OEM cupholders, either the clip on type, or the single DIN type. And we all know the problems with those - not secure enough fit, not accommodating large cups, etc. Also, the DIN type takes up an entire vertical DIN slot, making fitting double DIN GPS impossible. Other solutions seem to be to use a cutout for cups in the centre console box - which means the lid needs to stay open; and "ultimate cupholder" - which doesn't look OEM at all. So I was searching for generic cupholders on Ebay, and
    8 points
  32. :welcome: For the Cayenne S and Turbo (V8) <----- FRONT 1 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 1, bank 1 2 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 2, bank 1 3 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 3, bank 1 4 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 4, bank 1 5 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 5, bank 2 6 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 6, bank 2 7 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 7, bank 2 8 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 8, bank 2
    8 points
  33. The most difficult part of changing the oil and Oil filter is actually removing all of the underbody panels that allow you to gain access to the Oil Pan Drain Plug and the Engine Oil Filter. I won't go through the details here as if you're tackling the oil change I'm sure you're mechanically competent enough to handle that on your own. The only real trick in changing the oil is handling the filter assembly correctly and making sure you drain the oil pan and not the front transaxle oil. I chose to drain the filter first by removing silver hex-head plug and letting the filter assembly dra
    8 points
  34. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 1 each 996 102 151 64 (or 996 102 151 66) Polyrib Belt (with air conditioning) or 1 each 996 102 151 65 Polyrib Belt (without air conditioning) Tools you will need: 13 mm socket or wrench (for air cleaner) Regular screwdriver (for air cleaner) 24 mm socket or wrench (for belt pulley) Remove air cleaner housing. Mark belt travel direction with a coloured pen (if you intend to reuse it). Note: Never remove
    8 points
  35. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 1 ea 996 110 131 52 Air Filter or equal (BMC or K&N Filter) Tools you will need: 13 mm socket or wrench Regular screwdriver Phillips screwdriver Remove hexagon-head bolt M6 x 34. (13 mm wrench) Loosen the hose clamp on the throttle body and remove the connection of the sucking jet pumps (not present on early cars). Pull connecting plug off the mass air flow sensor by squeezing the connector clips.
    8 points
  36. The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397
    8 points
  37. This is a DIY for anyone who wants to replace their crappy ~’99-’03 ignition switch with the upgraded switch/steering lock combo Porsche came out with in about ’04. I’ve seen this problem in both 996 and Boxster posts, so I suspect owners of both models may undergo this repair. I was able to do 90% of this from the driver’s seat rather than having to work under the dash. It may be possible from underneath, but I was glad not to have to do it. I’m sorry I don’t have pictures. Cameras just aren’t my thing. However, I will try to create very accurate descriptions in lieu. As far as DIYs go,
    7 points
  38. Cylinder Order (engine is turned 180 degrees for Boxster/Cayman) Cylinders 1,2,3 = bank 1 Cylinders 4,5,6 = bank 2 DME Sensors 1 - Mass air flow sensor 2 - Engine temperature sensor 3 - VarioCam valve 4 - Ignition coil 5 - Tank venting valve 6 - Secondary air pump 7 - Throttle potentiometer 8 - Idle speed air control valve 9 - Injection valve 10 - Knock sensors 11 - Hall-effect sensors 12 - Engine compartment temperature sensor 13 - Oil temperature sensor 14 - Resonance flap
    7 points
  39. Filter location underneath the rear seat behind the driver side Replacing the filter: Recommended to do this job while the fuel tank is almost empty Fuel tank located underneath back seat Gain access to fuel filter need to flip back seat and look under the carpet Pull the seat buckle below the seat and flip the seat bottom Remove seat mount hinge, note you need special socket to fit the nuts Find below a round cut made on carpet, open Find round stainless steel caver with four screws, open it Then you will see the filter Use special tools to open the lock ring or use big fl
    7 points
  40. Yes that tube goes to the resonance flap. It's probably a really long tube right? That's the one that goes to the rear of the engine (front of car). From my above post: "In the diagram link below, the tubes you are talking about is #19, which goes into #21 (another hose) which then goes into the resonance flap: http://www.autoatlan...9-05/107-10.php" Yes the DIY link I posted has the procedure you need to remove the throttle body and t-plenum so you can reach behind the rear intake crossover and reconnect a new tube from the resonance flap to the change over valve in the position you
    7 points
  41. Just purchased a wind deflector and the mounting kit. Anyone have instructions on how to install it? Thanks. Edit -- please view the support topic here for details
    7 points
  42. This is a short DIY about installing white LED daytime running lights on your 996. But first, thanks to Loren and all the other members who have posted DIY articles. Lately I have used them to do the PSE cutout mod, removed those ugly airbag stickers from my visors and changed the plugs at 30K. Got those lousy Bosch plugs out, installed NGKs and it runs like a different car. Smoother and more power. I found some white LED bars on Ebay that looked like they would fit just right in the air intakes. Search for item 390103978391 on Ebay, they go for about $50. In order to install the wiring you
    7 points
  43. Happy New Year everyone! It was cold and foggy here in Sacramento so I decided to do something about the yellowish headlights on my 03 996 C4S. I got the car about 3 weeks ago and it looks great but the headlights were somewhat yellowish. Looking at them closely, I noticed that there were very fine cracks and oxidation on the surface and decided to try to polish them. I found a "headlight lens restoration system" by 3M for $20 at Autozone. I removed the headlights and cleaned them well. Then I used a 500 grit disc (dry) on a drill to remove heavier scratches: The headlight looked comp
    7 points
  44. Which radios fitted to Porsche can have their unlock code recovered through serial number? - CR-220/CDR-220 - Becker - CR-210/CDR-210 - Becker - Traffic Pro NAV/CD - Becker Which radios can not have their unlock code recovered through serial number? - CR1 - Alpine - CDR-23/24 (or later) - Becker - PCM (Porsche Communication Management) – Siemens & Becker How to get your radio serial number? CR-220/CDR-220: Hold down the TP button for at least 10 seconds after you turn the radio on. "Becker 1" will be displayed. Rotate the right knob (slowly) and it will display th
    7 points
  45. Integrated Garage Door Opener DIY I got tired of forgetting to remove the garage door opener at Concours and getting points taken off, so I decided to integrate it into the center console. I got my inspiration from Kirby's Garage Door Opener DIY and added a few twists. I took the existing garage door opener from Genie and opened it up to use just the circuit board. This particular circuit board had lots of extra unused traces and holes that went back to were the switch was (probably for different enclosures), so I just picked 2 and ran about 5 feet of wire from each one. Then I p
    7 points
  46. Please see PDF attachment for procedure 987.1 Bumper Removal Procedure.pdf
    6 points
  47. These rubber "accordians" can crack over time. Fortunately the rubber piece is only around $60, and can be replaced easily. You'll need to set aside about an hour and a half if you haven't done this before. Tools needed: Flat-bladed screwdriver 4mm allen wrench Ratchet with short extension and 10mm socket Parts needed: The bellows Two plastic expanding fasteners (might come with the bellows) First, deploy your spoiler manually, and shut off the ingnition. No need to disconnect the battery. You will see, along the rear edge, four caps, as seen below.
    6 points
  48. I've been planning to install B&B headers on my '97 Boxster for some time. ALL the bolts looked very rusty and the bolts holding the exhaust manifold to the front of the catalytic converter were in very sad shape. I wasn't too concerned about the latter because I knew I could cut them off with a cut-off wheel, etc... The manifold to cylinder head bolts are another story... For the last month or so, I've been soaking the 6 exhaust manifold bolts on each side with PB Blaster and WD-40 every few days, sometimes two or three days in a row. I have read about (and previously experienced
    6 points
  49. Many thanks to all that have guided me on my quest to understand and then accomplish tasks that before this forum and it's members I would not have even contemplated. And it's FUN plus my wife likes it because I'm saving some money doing routine service myself. That being said I am now going to try my first DIY Post on a little fun project I did in approx 2 hours and boy did it turn out well. I got the idea when I was admiring a fellow co-workers Carrera with the shiny enameled center wheel covers. Upon doing some research I discovered they are expensive and often times stolen. We have a fam
    6 points
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