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sharkster

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About sharkster

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  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    2001 996 Turbo

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  1. Danke! She's been fun so far;) No contest... that 3.9 has some 500hp and is lighter:P Plus she goes to 8800rpms: http://sharkwerks.com/porsche/technical-ar...ne-upgrade.html But she's just getting started:P Thanks and she's been getting a good work out so far:) Sure thing.. the GT3 has two rear and one center muffler. The two side mufflers have a bypass controlled by a valve (and switch inside the car- like PSE). Our set up replaces the center one;)
  2. In conjunction with Shark Week (hope you guys are all watching) I picked up an Arctic Silver 2010 997 GT3 MKII car today from our friends at Carlsen (Gary Q was great to work with as always). It car came with PCCB's, black full leather, adaptive sport seats with painted seat backs, self dim mirror and rain sensor (whoopee!), PCM3.0 With Extended NAV (cool for a daily d), sound package plus (for rockin' tunes), dynamic cornering lights, Bluetooth, Sport Chrono +, painted nipples and a gas guzzler option (which I really like!). A few thoughts since it's early days and I've been driving her around today so here's my first limited impressions... From a visual standpoint you can tell she's still a GT3. Compared to the MK1 GT3 or RS I have to say I still prefer the older nose. I think it's more aggressive looking and I was never a fan of the GT2 vent but I guess it's more integrated that way as opposed to a separate plastic vent. It's good to see that Porsche has been watching all of us MK1 guys with our various aftermarket radiator screen protection kits. They don't look as nice as the Cargraphic we have on the RS but at least we're protected now. I would've preferred black as they're a bit like chicken wire. The rear wing is a mixed bag... A bit like the RS except the curvature means you can't see too much (worse than the RS) but it gets thumbs-up from most folks. I think I prefer the Taco wing on the MK1. The rear bumper is pretty neat and with the vents hopefully expel some hot air. I really like the rear LED tail lights and it makes the newer car look more modern. The front lip is big. It looks like a cup lip. Dan says he's afraid someone might step on it while walking past the car. The day-time LED running lights are cool if you're into that sort of thing. Power/Transmission Shifting feels exactly the same as the RS to me and I'm right at home. No change needed there either. The lightened dual mass flywheel does give the car more of the character I like, but it doesn't quite touch a single mass flywheel from the RS or in a GT3. Still I can see why Porsche went that route since there's some of performance of a single mass and with the added dampening of a dual mass you don't get any transmission noise. I'd hoped it revved a bit quicker but I know the 3.8 Mahle Pistons they used do add some weight as well sadly (more on this in another post). Our 3.8 build did feel like it had more torque down low (perhaps to do with the tuning etc...) but there's still a noticeable difference compared to a stock MK1. It's subtle but it's there. Dan's going to post a picture later with the two window stickers but funny how it gets worse mileage eh:eek: Probably because of the added Variocam/intake etc.. Exhaust Note. Deeper than a 3.6 and sounds a lot like our 3.8 build that we had in Kermit. Still the best factory 911 sound you can get but as I'm typing this we're installing one of our exhausts on there because it's just too quiet. :P We've already had a few 2010 owners install our exhaust and they seem happy:D The wheels are truly slick. Great design and it's neat that they're center-lock as well. Haven't weighed them yet but I honestly think they suit the car really well and the aftermarket wheel industry has their work cut out for them. Not as easy as the old days that's for sure. The brakes are just brilliant. No qualms there and what you'd expect if you used them on the MK1s. Suspension... it's more akin to a GT2 in that it "feels" less fidgety than the RS. And in fact a lot like our PDK car. It reacts to the road less- especially in terms of rebound. I think some people will like it more for daily driving but I can see Porsche's progression going from the 6GT3 which was a handful on the street and more raw all the way to this MK2 which can honestly be driven by my grandma. I guess that's a good thing- at least for Porsche since it makes it even more accessible. Haven't played with all the SC, TC etc... settings either but I've spotted the lights/buttons in the center console. More buttons. Other stuff I do like: no sunroof, and those dynamic lights (geeky and freaky). The price has gone up. Boo. In Sum, the best modern-day 911 is the GT3 and I think this version is going to appeal to an even wider section in terms of how drivable it is (hardcore guys/gals might not like that). If you own a MK1 I don't think there's any "need" to jump up to a MK2 since it's really not all that different. Yes it's worth a "few" more seconds at the ring with a bit more power and revamped suspension but I can't see MK2 guys blasting past MK1 guys at the track either. It's got a lot more gadgets and might look a bit more modern but it's still basically the same car from 10 feet away, which is a good thing. So very hectic day here for us and thanks for tuning in:P There she is at home with Kermit: RS Wing on the left vs baby-RS wing on the right: MK2 front: The rear bumper (and that meshy stuff again): The new steering wheel is a bit naff. A lot of plastic: Options galore: Those buttons: 3.9 vs 3.8 (more on this later): Updated today with a video of the car in action:
  3. Thanks for the kind words fellas and enjoy her Alex!
  4. Removing the ECU Carpet Cover and ECU Tray Now you must remove the carpeted cover over the ECU tray. First pull up from the middle-rear of the carpet: To pull the carpet out, it must bow-up in the middle as shown in the picture, to allow the sides to be removed. Then it pulls straight-up and out of the car. With the ECU tray exposed, locate the 10mm nut in the center of the trays and remove it. Next remove the two 10mm nuts on the left side of the tray: Now you can pull the left side of the tray up. It is an aluminum piece with a foam block attached to it. The ECU tray can now be flipped over. Before you do, push the carpet in at the corner as shown in the picture below. Do not disconnect any cables at this time. Removing the ECU and Cables With the tray inverted, remove the four T30 Torx bolts (two per side) holding the smaller module to the ECU tray. Do not disconnect it. Set the black module up and out of the way, and you can now disconnect the ECU. Remove the cables in order, from left to right (first 1, 2, 3, 4, then 5). The far left and far right cables are removed by squeezing tabs at the top: The inner connections are removed by first pressing the button (A) and rotating the keeper to the left (B). No extra force should be required: The connections will pop-out on their own as you release this keeper system. The ECU has been removed from the car, and is now ready to send to SharkWerks for the EVOMSit Software Upgrade! Reinstalling the ECU Re-install the ECU's connectors in the opposite order of removed (first 5, 4, 3, 2, then 1). The inner connectors will lock in automatically as the keeper is rotated. Make sure they are rotated fully to the left (as they were removed) before you attempt to re-install. Be extra careful when tightening the T30 Torx bolts that hold the rear seat receivers, as the surrounding material is particularly susceptible to dents and damage. When replacing the negative battery cable, ensure it's fully pressed onto the terminal before tightening the 10mm nut. Tighten the battery negative until it's snug. Since it is lead, it should never be torqued extremely tight.
  5. If you guys are thinking of a re-flash and/or want to change the software on your 996 or 997, it may be necessary to remove the ECU from the car yourself. We actually wrote up a DIY for this on our site so I figured I'd share it On hardtop models, the ECU is attached to a tray behind the back seats, and is generally blocked by the Bose subwoofer system which also has to be removed. The process takes about 15-30 minutes or less. If your car is a cabriolet, you will need to follow another set of steps which we will document at a later time. Before you begin, you should have the tools required available, as getting in and out of the rear seat can be difficult, especially once disassembled. Tools Required 6mm hex socket or Allen key T30 Torx screwdriver 10mm socket wrench 10mm combination/spanner wrench Disconnecting the Battery Before you disconnect the battery, you should adjust the front seats forward so you can have easier access to the back seat. You will now remove the battery ground (negative battery cable) to disconnect power from the car before removing the ECU. Note that this will reset your radio code. You should be sure you have this code before you reset the battery. It should be contained with your owner's manual in the documentation included with the car. Open the front hood on your car. Locate the battery cover, which is found at the top section of the engine bay, close to the windshield. It is labeled with PORSCHE and has two round plastic fasteners holding it in place: To remove the two fasteners twist them counter-clockwise until they are loose, then carefully lift the cover up and set it aside. The ground cable is on the driver's side of the battery. Loosen the 10mm nut as shown in the photo, then wiggle the cable off the battery terminal. Push the cable out of the way, below the battery top. Removing the Bose Subwoofer (If your car does not come with the Bose Subwoofer, you may skip this step.) With the front seats tilted forward, remove your shoes and step into the rear seat of your Porsche. To remove the subwoofer, you must first remove the vent covers. These are plastic pieces on either side of the subwoofer and say "Bose". To remove them, very carefully pry the edges out with your finger. Then pull straight back to remove them. Here's a picture showing the tabs on the backside: Next, remove the rear seat receivers from both sides. These receivers are an obstruction when trying to remove the subwoofer. These are attached by a 6mm hex bolt. Remove the two T30 Torx screws holding the subwoofer in. These are found at the bottom of the vents that were covered. The subwoofer must have its electrical harness disconnected to be removed from the car. Slide it forward a few inches: Here is a picture of the back-side of the subwoofer, showing the connector (on the driver's side): To remove this harness, squeeze the end tabs at the top and bottom of the connector, and pull it back (toward the passenger side of the car). The subwoofer can now be completely removed from the car.
  6. ECU & DME Removal DIY If you guys are thinking of a re-flash and/or want to change the software on your 996 or 997, it may be necessary to remove the ECU from the car yourself. We actually wrote up a DIY for this on our site so I figured I'd share it On hardtop models, the ECU is attached to a tray behind the back seats, and is generally blocked by the Bose subwoofer system which also has to be removed. The process takes about 15-30 minutes or less. If your car is a cabriolet, you will need to follow another set of steps which we will document at a later time. Before you begin, you should have the tools required available, as getting in and out of the rear seat can be difficult, especially once disassembled. Tools Required 6mm hex socket or Allen key T30 Torx screwdriver 10mm socket wrench 10mm combination/spanner wrench Disconnecting the Battery Before you disconnect the battery, you should adjust the front seats forward so you can have easier access to the back seat. You will now remove the battery ground (negative battery cable) to disconnect power from the car before removing the ECU. Note that this will reset your radio code. You should be sure you have this code before you reset the battery. It should be contained with your owner's manual in the documentation included with the car. Open the front hood on your car. Locate the battery cover, which is found at the top section of the engine bay, close to the windshield. It is labeled with PORSCHE and has two round plastic fasteners holding it in place: To remove the two fasteners twist them counter-clockwise until they are loose, then carefully lift the cover up and set it aside. The ground cable is on the driver's side of the battery. Loosen the 10mm nut as shown in the photo, then wiggle the cable off the battery terminal. Push the cable out of the way, below the battery top. Removing the Bose Subwoofer (If your car does not come with the Bose Subwoofer, you may skip this step.) With the front seats tilted forward, remove your shoes and step into the rear seat of your Porsche. To remove the subwoofer, you must first remove the vent covers. These are plastic pieces on either side of the subwoofer and say "Bose". To remove them, very carefully pry the edges out with your finger. Then pull straight back to remove them. Here's a picture showing the tabs on the backside: Next, remove the rear seat receivers from both sides. These receivers are an obstruction when trying to remove the subwoofer. These are attached by a 6mm hex bolt. Remove the two T30 Torx screws holding the subwoofer in. These are found at the bottom of the vents that were covered. The subwoofer must have its electrical harness disconnected to be removed from the car. Slide it forward a few inches: Here is a picture of the back-side of the subwoofer, showing the connector (on the driver's side): To remove this harness, squeeze the end tabs at the top and bottom of the connector, and pull it back (toward the passenger side of the car). The subwoofer can now be completely removed from the car. Author sharkster Category Carrera (996) - Mods Submitted 07/01/2009 09:48 AM  
  7. Great to meet you bernie and thanks for swinging by... 1.0bar is about all you want from a K16 car with an exhaust. Anymore than that and you're just spinning the turbos out of their efficiency range anyways ;) Thanks for the kind words guys!
  8. Hey guys, we were in a real rush yesterday (Fred had to go to the gym ) so unfortunately we didn't get as much footage as I wanted. The wind was pretty high as well and in reality only the second flyby captures some of the essence of that sound. I swear there is no other Porsche I've heard (road cars that is) other than the CGT that sounds this good/crazy. It's such a clean/crisp sound that I know what I'm doing on ours in 2 weeks time For 7500 you get 200 cell high flow cats, longer tube headers and some tips but you also loose about 38 pounds of weight (verified). I'm not sure on the power gains (you'll need to ask Fred) but I'm sure that we'll dyno ours etc... Enjoy and we will make more http://videos.g33kd.net/fred_997GT3_rs@sharkwerks.wmv
  9. If any of you guys are in the bay area, I have one on my shop car so you could always listen to it. I could still probably get a GB going.
  10. A couple of things that come to mind here. On the NA cars I've had one too many instances of CELs with after-market cats. They eventually trigger CELs, or at least the ones with 100, 200 cell cats do. The only set that hasn't and that I still use are the AWE cats. We've seen/installed/tried every exhaust system you can do and to date here are my favorites 1)Exhaust- Tubi- the sound is fantastic. The materials are very light in weight. There's no resonance. The built quality is top-notch but it's very expensive at 2350 for the mufflers. Installation is a breeze because the fitment is perfect. The Europipe is also a fantastic exhaust (again very expensive) and hand-made with some of the prettiest welds you'll ever see. The sound is also something that needs to appreciated in person (However it's not light). I like the AWE for its price/value. It's fairly quiet (even when you're on it) so it's very liveable for a daily driver. For the 1195 range it's the best one out there. I've always liked the Tech Art stuff but have much more experience with their parts on the 996TT/997TT side. I've only done a couple of tech art mufflers on NA cars and the sound was deeper than the other two mentioned above but still nice and sporty (not boaty). Fitment was great (as you'd expect). Cats - honestly I would stay stock Over to the headers, I would say it's a close call between the Tubis and the AWE. Both are nicely manufactured (the Tubi "looks" prettier if that matters to you). The nice thing about the tubi headers is that they do not hand down any further than the stock ones, which is an issue to some people. The tubis are about 1000 more than the AWEs though. Both are similair in style in terms of being longer tube and equal length and have venturi-style collectors.
  11. Just as an FYI guys... It's apparently the Fuel Tank according to Brian Haske @ Carlsen "Christian said the sensor is off the tank, by the sending unit" Easy enough to fix:)
  12. That's the direction:) Bloody light came on again... Of course noboyd has seen "this" one before.... Not even sure what "tank" they are referring too here lol. The PST2 and the manuals don't really say much about this one;(
  13. You know me.. I just looooooove to rip things apart anyways:) Loren you are so bloody right man. I love no PSM, no E gas... 2930 pounds and we haven't even stripped her down!!!
  14. Dangit! Looks like me has to go through the wiring harness on this one:(
  15. Just picked up a 99 C2 (non Egas just for Loren!) for the shop today and it has the P0452 code? Anyone had that yet? James is away tomorrow so I thought I'd try fix it without him hehe;)
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