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mrrogers

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About mrrogers

  • Rank
    Contributing Member

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  • Gender
    Male

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  • From
    Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Porsche Club
    No
  • Present cars
    2009 Dodge Journey
    2005 buick LaCrosse
  • Future cars
    Cayenne Diesel
  • Former cars
    1957 Speedster
  1. You are probably right. It is a shame that Porsche did not get the clearances right in the Cayenne V8 engine. They are attractive cars for many reasons, but the cylinder scoring is a problem in northern climates. Best regards,
  2. My independent Porsche garage is quoting me $6,000 to repair the engine. That includes removing engine, tearing down, installing eight new sleeves in the eight cylinders, one set of rings for one new piston, reassembly, and re-install engine in car. Based on that quote, I believe that the dealer's $14,500 asking price is too high. Would it be a good deal at $8,000? Best regards,
  3. Thank you for your advice. I am looking at used engines as an option to putting a sleeve in the current engine. It seems that there are two different 2008 4.8 engines without turbo per www.car-part.com. In the VIN number, the fifth digit is either B or D. Do you know what the difference is? The car I am looking at has the B engine. Is it possible to install a D engine in a car originally equipped with the B engine? Best regards,
  4. I stumbled across a 2008 S with 61K miles and a scored # 8 cylinder in the 4.8 engine. Two different Porsche dealers boroscoped the engine and confirm that it is only the # 8 cylinder that is scored. The dealer is asking $14,500 for it, and Kelley Blue Book Fair Trade In is $19,428. I have asked my local Porsche independent shop for a quote to remove the engine, bore out the number #8 cylinder, press in a new sleeve, and reassemble the car. Assuming that the quote is reasonable, would this be a good engine after the rework, or has the cold starts in the Minnesota winters and the 20,000 mile oil change intervals caused permanent damage? Should I get a new coolant distributor installed while the engine is out?
  5. What codes, and what type of diagnostic tool was used to retrieve them? Thank you for your prompt and detailed reply. I just sent the seller an email asking what the codes are. He claims that he uses the Durametric tool. My seller just had surgery, so my reply is slow. Codes are 0130 and 5525. Seller claims that 0130 is mass air flow which he claims to have replaced twice. 5525 he claims is improper data from DME. Any idea as to what is wrong and how much it might cost to repair? OK, I am going to stick my neck out here because I obviously have not seen the car, and say "Walk away". P5525 is troublesome; it is not "improper data from the DME" but rather a data communications fault with the DME, which can cause the car to throw ABS, PSM and other codes. While there have been cases where P5525 was caused by leaking intercooler hoses, in the worst case scenario, a P5525 can result in having to replace the DME, which is anything but cheap. I am concerned about the DME being "reprogrammed" without knowing by whom and to what it was reflashed. I would also like to know if the DME has ever be reflashed to an aftermarket program, some of which cause long term problems with these cars. Porsche's are complicated, Porsche Turbo's are very complicated. You could be buying in to a real can of worms here, and I'm sure there are other Turbo's for sale out there which would pass a PPI with flying colors. JFP, Thank you for your prompt and detailed reply. I value your opinion. Being a mechanical guy, I have always been intimidated by these types of problems. The turbos do not have the IMS bearing problems, but it appears that they have their own unique problems. The search for my forth Porsche continues. If Porsche would ever build a galvanived steel 356 with ABS and four airbags, I would be one happy customer. Best regards,
  6. What codes, and what type of diagnostic tool was used to retrieve them? Thank you for your prompt and detailed reply. I just sent the seller an email asking what the codes are. He claims that he uses the Durametric tool. My seller just had surgery, so my reply is slow. Codes are 0130 and 5525. Seller claims that 0130 is mass air flow which he claims to have replaced twice. 5525 he claims is improper data from DME. Any idea as to what is wrong and how much it might cost to repair?
  7. What codes, and what type of diagnostic tool was used to retrieve them? Thank you for your prompt and detailed reply. I just sent the seller an email asking what the codes are. He claims that he uses the Durametric tool.
  8. I found a 2004 Twin Turbo convertible for sale with 57.500 miles. VIN is wp0cb29994s675585. The PSM and ABS came on, and the car is in the limp home mode. The owner has replaced the coils, plugs, throttle pedal sensor, electric throttle on the motor, MAF, and turbo boost valve. The ECU has been checked and reprogrammed. The Durametric codes were MAF and No connection from ECU to DME for the PSM and ABS lights. I wonder what is wrong, and how much it might cost to fix it? Best regards,
  9. JFP, Thank you. I guess I need to check the 2005 Boxster S 3.2 to see which IMS bearing it has. Best regards,
  10. Thank you JFP, Concerning the IMS bearing, I believe that the 2006 Cayman S 3.4 has the style where the engine must be opened up in order to change to the LN Engineering IMS bearing. I believe that the 2005 Boxster S 3.2 has the bearing that can be replaced without opening up the engine. Do you agree? Best regards,
  11. As I posted yesterday, I have found a 2006 Cayman S 3.4 with two bad cylinders (2 & 5 are pitted). I located a 2005 Boxster S 3.2 engine. I believe that both engines are VarioCam Plus. Could I use the Boxster engine in the Cayman? Would I need to change the ECU? Best regards,
  12. JFP, Thank you for your prompt and detailed reply. I guess I need to get it through my head that a Cayman will always be limited production, and it takes a lot longer to find what you need.
  13. I found a 2006 Cayman S 3.4 with two bad cylinders (2 & 5). These engines seem to be in short supply. I asked my Porsche dealer for the price of the crate engine. He said that there are no crate engines, but he would try to find a short block. I found a 2010 Boxster S 3.4 engine. Would it be possible to install this engine in a 2006 Cayman? Best regards,
  14. The 2002 one owner clean CarFax 38,000 mile triple black 911 six speed manual convertible with the failed IMS bearing sold for $12,500. The engine skipped time and was locked up solid. Car needed a brake job and new tires. I was not the buyer. The new owner has located a used engine.
  15. Jason, Thank you for your detailed reply. You are right about the money. It is hard to make the numbers work on these cars. It is amazing to me that a one owner, clean CarFax 2002 911 with 38,000 miles and a failed IMS bearing cannot be saved. They used to say that you buy a Ferrari to get the engine, and the rest of the car is free. Perhaps some Porsches are approaching this territory. Best regards.
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