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JordanSimon

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About JordanSimon

  • Rank
    Contributing Member

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  • Gender
    Male

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  • From
    Rockland cty, NY
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    2001 996 C2
    1997 Ferrari 355spyder
    1970 454 Corvette roadster
  1. I don't know about dropping the clutch and smoking the tires but so far my 996 has done very well on drivers ed track days. Half hour sessions at 4000-7000k RPMs without so much as a hicup.
  2. Thank you everyone for the birthday wishes. Had a great day.

  3. That part comes with the hard line. Item #6 in the parts diagram is the hard line and the "clip" that you need. I just replaced the hardline on my 996 when I stripped the fitting using a cheap line wrench. The hardline came with a new clip. I still have the old clip in pretty good shape if you're still in need.
  4. Just had my rotors resurfaced today. Stock cross drilled. No cracks. Started at 27.5 mm front and 23.5 mm rear. After resurfacing, they are 27.2 mm and 23.2. mm. The local machine shop charged $24 each (they charge $16 for solid rotors). Also saw another set there, slotted and cross drilled fresh off the lathe. It definitely can be done and not expensive.
  5. Thank you all for the Birthday wishes and a Happy Thanksgiving to all.

  6. When I take my 996 to the track and switch from street pads to track pads, I do not do anything special to re-burnish the rotors. A couple of warm up laps, slowing adding heat, is adequate to transfer the pad material to the rotor, and the pad compounds, from one pad to the next, is pretty similar. This assumes, of course, that you have properly broken in the pads prior to arriving at the track. Note real track pads are a lot harder to break in than the performance pads. ANd at end of day, I change back out, and never give it a second thought. I've had no problems with this approach. I do not bleed when changing pads in this manner. I bleed before I leave home just to change out the fluid in the caliper. If you are confident you have good fluid, no air or moisture, and you don't find any leaks, then I think the next step is a dedicated track pad. Hawk HT10, while I have never used them, look like they have a very wide and high temperatre range. In the Pagid brand, Orange is a great compound and very popular. Yellow is an endurance compound and last a longer time, but are more expensive. My favorite Pagid is Black, but they are hard on rotors. I use DTC 70 on my 986S race car - they are great, but are hard on rotors.
  7. Thanks for the advice. I did just flush through 2 fresh liters of ATE blu and did a proper bleed with the motive. I have the GT3 cooling scoops already. I'm going to try cleaning the rotors and changing back to my stock pads. I'll do a manual bleed after and see if things firm up. When you change pads at the track, do you have to bed them in? Do you do a quick bleed after pad changes as well? Thanks again for your advice. Jordan
  8. Need some advice. 996 carrera 2 w/ 20k mi. I had the brake fluid flushed last year w/ ATE blue ( independant porsche shop). Pedal was slightly soft at the end of DE track day after this. Bled the brakes w/ motive bleeder. No change on next track day. Changed the pads from stock to Hawk HPS and flushed brake lines with 2 liters of ATE/ bedded pads per recommendations. Pedal was firm on drive to track although initial bite of pads was not too good. Pedal travel increased after a few laps on next track day and brake were very soft/ very little "bite". Next day, brakes are ok on the street but not as good as stock. Is this a poor pad choice? Glazed rotors? air trapped in ABS? I use the car for local spirited drives and track days. Not a daily driver. Considering upgrading to a Hawk HP+ or Hawk HT-10. Anyone have any experience with these pads or any others for good track/ acceptable street performance? Any advice appreciated. Jordan
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