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EMC2

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About EMC2

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  • From
    Atlanta Area
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    2014 Panamera GTS
    2009 911 Carrera
    2009 Cayenne S

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  1. View this tutorial 997.2 3.6l AOS (Air Oil / Oil Mist Separator) DIY I replaced my AOS back in late September this year, and just haven't had a chance until now to compile the DIY. The car was running great and consuming an average amount of oil according to Porsche guidelines, so this was purely a preventative step. Although the car ran great before, it did actually feel a bit better/smoother after the AOS install (particularly at idle and in the lower rev range) At the time the car had about 72k miles on the clock. Please excuse all the pollen & dust in the part of the engine bay where the AOS is installed (I don't think it's avoidable :) I installed the OEM AOS with p/n 9A1 107 040 02 (note this is revision 3 of the part. I do not know what (if anything) has changed since prior versions. The trickiest part of the job was actually replacing the plenum (air distributor pipe). It's the kind of thing that will always be easier the 2nd time around. Just pay very close attention to how the rubber sleeves are fitted when you first remove the half moon clamps, and you should be fine. This is really key as you do not want this part incorrectly installed and allowing dirty and unmetered air into the system. Hopefully the pictures below make the steps clear. I borrowed some pics from the web in order to superimpose/highlight key areas. Step 1: Remove the airbox (there are many posts/DIY's on this step so I won't repeat it here) Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Loosening this harness will provide a lot more flexibility when installing the AOS and also when reinstalling the half moon clamps which connect and hinge from the rear. Step 6: Step 7: Step 8: Step 9: For the o-rings I used the following as it was the closest in specs and operating temp to what Porsche recommends and you can actually find the stuff: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XBH9HI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Step 10: Note the left side connector on the AOS is a real pain to get well seated. Also the design I think is flawed in that it will never sit 100% flush. This can also be seen when comparing the 2 ports on the old AOS. You can see that the left side port has some dust above the o-ring, whereas the right side port does not. I think this really comes down to the design of the part and that the area where it seats has a conical opening. For reassembly - mount the air distributor/plenum and secure the half moon clamps before replacing the wiring harness conduit mounting screws to ensure more wiggle room back there. I posted my findings about the change (increase) in the vacuum level after the new AOS install in the thread linked below: http://rennlist.com/forums/997-forum/956371-997-2-vacuum-level-at-oil-filler-neck-let-s-build-a-data-resource.html If anyone is doing this DIY or has an opportunity to add their data to the abovementioned mentioned thread on vacuum levels, that would be most appreciated. It's been over 3 months since the new AOS install and the car still runs beautifully. It is too soon to determine if oil consumption has changed at all, but that was never a concern to start with. Today I changed out the air filters and took the opportunity to inspect the throttle body which I'm pleased to say was spotless inside. Author EMC2 Category Carrera (997-2) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 01/02/2017 05:13 PM Updated 02/26/2017 04:15 PM  
  2. 991 Style Projector LED Headlights for 997 - Product Tear Down and Review - Pic Heavy After much deliberation I decided to try out the aftermarket 991 LED style headlights for the 997. These lights are available from many sources online around the world. It seems they are all made by the same manufacturer although I cannot verify this 100%. It appears the primary distributor for these in the US is Spyder Auto, who have unfortunately been rather uncooperative in dealing with the issues described below which were conveyed to them about a month back. I’m not a fan of using aftermarket parts, except in rare cases. I’ll talk more about this at the end of this post, because I know it is sometimes a contentious point. There are specific models for vehicles with Halogen lights and some specifically for HID equipped vehicles, and they are available with black and silver internal housings. You will also find that there is a lot of conflicting information regarding which model years 997 they will fit. If you go by the listings you might assume that these are not compatible with the 997.2. However after reviewing the Porsche PET diagrams it became clear that the units should work with 997.2 fitted with standard headlights (but not bi-xenon optioned vehicles). (note you have to move the HID bulb, motor and control module from your OEM lights into these units.) I ordered the lights from CarPart4U on Amazon, and I must say I was very impressed with their service and support when it cam to handling the returns of one of the sets. I ordered the Black HID version as shown here. http://spyderauto.com/product.php?mode=cs&id=PRO-YD-P99705-HID-DRL-BK&car_make=Porsche&car_model=911&car_year=2009&t=-Porsche-911-997-2005-2009-Projector-Headlights-Xenon-HID-Model-Only-(-Not-Compatible-With-Halogen-Model-)-DRL-LED-Black The parts arrived very well packaged as you can see below. The lights actually look really good overall, but the quality of the body housing and the sealing mechanism at the rear is not at the same level of quality as OEM, but it is acceptable. Installation of the OEM parts into the new housing was pretty easy. Unfortunately on close inspection I noticed some defects in the LED ring as can be seen in the pictures below. I figured I got a bad set so I ordered a second set which arrived a few days later. Unfortunately that second set had the same issue in the LED ring, and even worse it had some serious defects in the chrome paint/plating on the Lens housings as can be seen in the pics below. I returned this second set back to the supplier. without any issues At this point I started to look around to see if there were similar reported issues, and if this was due to some fundamental design or assembly flaw. I've subsequently seen other pics online like the one below which show exactly the same issue on another vehicle. I really didn’t feel like trying my luck with a 3rd set, and since I like to take things apart I figured I’d try to see what the issue was and how it could be fixed, knowing full well that I would be voiding the warranty and passing the point of no return. I tested the lights for a few days to ensure the light beam and distribution was good, and the motor function worked fine. The only issue was some condensation build up occurred one night, but I figured that could be resolved also. Another observation is that I am not sure why the manufacturer chose to make the LED ring with a white backing, as this is not really consistent with the OEM Porsche lights. I have the OEM PDLS LED headlights on my Panamera GTS and the LED ring has more of a silver backing to it. The issue (in my opinion) is that the white backing makes the LED ring really exaggerated against the black housing (probably not as visible with the silver housing version). Nevertheless, I decided I would take the plunge and pull the units apart. Using a heat gun to soften the adhesive, I was able to gradually pull the front lenses off. This was NOT an easy process by any means. Once I got the units open it became very clear what the issue was. there are a couple of sharp edges in the black housing that holds the LED ring, and those edges cause the white paint on the back of the LED ring to scrape off, presumably during assembly initially and then gradually more and more over time as any harsh motion occurs (whether during shipping, installing, or possibly even over time when driving). It also may be possible that this rings are installed before the paint is 100% cured. Below you can see the internal housing and affected areas. The bottom line is that it leaves unsightly issues in areas of the lights which are are visible. Granted, these may not be visible when standing a few yards away, but a product should simply not be made this way, especially if you’re going to put it on a Porsche. This issue could have been easily avoided by applying some backing tape to the friction areas where the light ring rests. I first attempted to touch up the damaged paint areas, but it was still noticeable through the front of the LED ring. What I really wanted to do was strip the white paint off the rear of the LED ring and apply completely new paint, but this just wasn’t an option as it would likely damage the finish/surface of the ring. I reached out in parallel to the distributors to see if I could get replacement unpainted rings but they have not been of any assistance at all. Having come this far I decided on a different route. I had some Porsche GT Silver spray paint left over from a previous project so I decided to do a few tests by spraying some clear plastic to determine how much I could spray the LED rings and still have the LED’s shine through. Once I got the technique right I went ahead and sprayed the LED rings. (again - point of no return…) The result was very nice in that the LED rings now blend more nicely with the rest of the housing, and the LED’s still shine through quite nicely. It also helped to make the 4 LED points stand out a little better when compared with the original setup. the downside is that the light in the rest of the ring is a little more subdued, but it is a compromise I can live with, as I didn’t really buy the lights for the LED ring, but rather for the cleaner overall look they would give the front of the car. In my personal opinion the OEM headlight reflectors detract a little from the otherwise clean lines and look of the 911. The condensation issue also went away after I resealed the lenses onto the units. I guess they were not sealed very well during manufacturing. I’m still trying to figure out how to source replacement rings so I can try and paint the rear/reflector portion the way it should have been done to begin with. if anyone knows a better contact (distributor or manufacturer) I’d be most appreciated. Finished Result: (note: Ill try to get some better comparison pics next to the Panamera GTS. The light color is not bad at all, but the LED's have much lower intensity than on the OEM lights. My next project will be to look at upgrading the LED's) In summary, I think is a real pity that such an avoidable issue exists with these lights. I think if you have the silver housings it may not be noticeable at all (or at least not enough to be a concern), but with the black housings it is a real issue if you want a well finished product. Hopefully the manufacturer or distributor steps up and offers replacement or spare parts. I'd happily pay for new rings that I can paint myself and reinstall. The lights give a nice clean look to the car and are actually so discreet that many people don't even realize they are different or non-stock (even when displaying my car at the last Caffeine & Exotics show). Author EMC2 Category Carrera (997-2) - Mods Submitted 09/30/2016 02:11 PM Updated 09/30/2016 05:31 PM  
  3. I replaced my AOS back in late September this year, and just haven't had a chance until now to compile the DIY. The car was running great and consuming an average amount of oil according to Porsche guidelines, so this was purely a preventative step. Although the car ran great before, it did actually feel a bit better/smoother after the AOS install (particularly at idle and in the lower rev range) At the time the car had about 72k miles on the clock. Please excuse all the pollen & dust in the part of the engine bay where the AOS is installed (I don't think it's avoidable :) I installed the OEM AOS with p/n 9A1 107 040 02 (note this is revision 3 of the part. I do not know what (if anything) has changed since prior versions. The trickiest part of the job was actually replacing the plenum (air distributor pipe). It's the kind of thing that will always be easier the 2nd time around. Just pay very close attention to how the rubber sleeves are fitted when you first remove the half moon clamps, and you should be fine. This is really key as you do not want this part incorrectly installed and allowing dirty and unmetered air into the system. Hopefully the pictures below make the steps clear. I borrowed some pics from the web in order to superimpose/highlight key areas. Step 1: Remove the airbox (there are many posts/DIY's on this step so I won't repeat it here) Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Loosening this harness will provide a lot more flexibility when installing the AOS and also when reinstalling the half moon clamps which connect and hinge from the rear. Step 6: Step 7: Step 8: Step 9: For the o-rings I used the following as it was the closest in specs and operating temp to what Porsche recommends and you can actually find the stuff: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XBH9HI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Step 10: Note the left side connector on the AOS is a real pain to get well seated. Also the design I think is flawed in that it will never sit 100% flush. This can also be seen when comparing the 2 ports on the old AOS. You can see that the left side port has some dust above the o-ring, whereas the right side port does not. I think this really comes down to the design of the part and that the area where it seats has a conical opening. For reassembly - mount the air distributor/plenum and secure the half moon clamps before replacing the wiring harness conduit mounting screws to ensure more wiggle room back there. I posted my findings about the change (increase) in the vacuum level after the new AOS install in the thread linked below: http://rennlist.com/forums/997-forum/956371-997-2-vacuum-level-at-oil-filler-neck-let-s-build-a-data-resource.html If anyone is doing this DIY or has an opportunity to add their data to the abovementioned mentioned thread on vacuum levels, that would be most appreciated. It's been over 3 months since the new AOS install and the car still runs beautifully. It is too soon to determine if oil consumption has changed at all, but that was never a concern to start with. Today I changed out the air filters and took the opportunity to inspect the throttle body which I'm pleased to say was spotless inside.
  4. After much deliberation I decided to try out the aftermarket 991 LED style headlights for the 997. These lights are available from many sources online around the world. It seems they are all made by the same manufacturer although I cannot verify this 100%. It appears the primary distributor for these in the US is Spyder Auto, who have unfortunately been rather uncooperative in dealing with the issues described below which were conveyed to them about a month back. I’m not a fan of using aftermarket parts, except in rare cases. I’ll talk more about this at the end of this post, because I know it is sometimes a contentious point. There are specific models for vehicles with Halogen lights and some specifically for HID equipped vehicles, and they are available with black and silver internal housings. You will also find that there is a lot of conflicting information regarding which model years 997 they will fit. If you go by the listings you might assume that these are not compatible with the 997.2. However after reviewing the Porsche PET diagrams it became clear that the units should work with 997.2 fitted with standard headlights (but not bi-xenon optioned vehicles). (note you have to move the HID bulb, motor and control module from your OEM lights into these units.) I ordered the lights from CarPart4U on Amazon, and I must say I was very impressed with their service and support when it cam to handling the returns of one of the sets. I ordered the Black HID version as shown here. http://spyderauto.com/product.php?mode=cs&id=PRO-YD-P99705-HID-DRL-BK&car_make=Porsche&car_model=911&car_year=2009&t=-Porsche-911-997-2005-2009-Projector-Headlights-Xenon-HID-Model-Only-(-Not-Compatible-With-Halogen-Model-)-DRL-LED-Black The parts arrived very well packaged as you can see below. The lights actually look really good overall, but the quality of the body housing and the sealing mechanism at the rear is not at the same level of quality as OEM, but it is acceptable. Installation of the OEM parts into the new housing was pretty easy. Unfortunately on close inspection I noticed some defects in the LED ring as can be seen in the pictures below. I figured I got a bad set so I ordered a second set which arrived a few days later. Unfortunately that second set had the same issue in the LED ring, and even worse it had some serious defects in the chrome paint/plating on the Lens housings as can be seen in the pics below. I returned this second set back to the supplier. without any issues At this point I started to look around to see if there were similar reported issues, and if this was due to some fundamental design or assembly flaw. I've subsequently seen other pics online like the one below which show exactly the same issue on another vehicle. I really didn’t feel like trying my luck with a 3rd set, and since I like to take things apart I figured I’d try to see what the issue was and how it could be fixed, knowing full well that I would be voiding the warranty and passing the point of no return. I tested the lights for a few days to ensure the light beam and distribution was good, and the motor function worked fine. The only issue was some condensation build up occurred one night, but I figured that could be resolved also. Another observation is that I am not sure why the manufacturer chose to make the LED ring with a white backing, as this is not really consistent with the OEM Porsche lights. I have the OEM PDLS LED headlights on my Panamera GTS and the LED ring has more of a silver backing to it. The issue (in my opinion) is that the white backing makes the LED ring really exaggerated against the black housing (probably not as visible with the silver housing version). Nevertheless, I decided I would take the plunge and pull the units apart. Using a heat gun to soften the adhesive, I was able to gradually pull the front lenses off. This was NOT an easy process by any means. Once I got the units open it became very clear what the issue was. there are a couple of sharp edges in the black housing that holds the LED ring, and those edges cause the white paint on the back of the LED ring to scrape off, presumably during assembly initially and then gradually more and more over time as any harsh motion occurs (whether during shipping, installing, or possibly even over time when driving). It also may be possible that this rings are installed before the paint is 100% cured. Below you can see the internal housing and affected areas. The bottom line is that it leaves unsightly issues in areas of the lights which are are visible. Granted, these may not be visible when standing a few yards away, but a product should simply not be made this way, especially if you’re going to put it on a Porsche. This issue could have been easily avoided by applying some backing tape to the friction areas where the light ring rests. I first attempted to touch up the damaged paint areas, but it was still noticeable through the front of the LED ring. What I really wanted to do was strip the white paint off the rear of the LED ring and apply completely new paint, but this just wasn’t an option as it would likely damage the finish/surface of the ring. I reached out in parallel to the distributors to see if I could get replacement unpainted rings but they have not been of any assistance at all. Having come this far I decided on a different route. I had some Porsche GT Silver spray paint left over from a previous project so I decided to do a few tests by spraying some clear plastic to determine how much I could spray the LED rings and still have the LED’s shine through. Once I got the technique right I went ahead and sprayed the LED rings. (again - point of no return…) The result was very nice in that the LED rings now blend more nicely with the rest of the housing, and the LED’s still shine through quite nicely. It also helped to make the 4 LED points stand out a little better when compared with the original setup. the downside is that the light in the rest of the ring is a little more subdued, but it is a compromise I can live with, as I didn’t really buy the lights for the LED ring, but rather for the cleaner overall look they would give the front of the car. In my personal opinion the OEM headlight reflectors detract a little from the otherwise clean lines and look of the 911. The condensation issue also went away after I resealed the lenses onto the units. I guess they were not sealed very well during manufacturing. I’m still trying to figure out how to source replacement rings so I can try and paint the rear/reflector portion the way it should have been done to begin with. if anyone knows a better contact (distributor or manufacturer) I’d be most appreciated. Finished Result: (note: Ill try to get some better comparison pics next to the Panamera GTS. The light color is not bad at all, but the LED's have much lower intensity than on the OEM lights. My next project will be to look at upgrading the LED's) In summary, I think is a real pity that such an avoidable issue exists with these lights. I think if you have the silver housings it may not be noticeable at all (or at least not enough to be a concern), but with the black housings it is a real issue if you want a well finished product. Hopefully the manufacturer or distributor steps up and offers replacement or spare parts. I'd happily pay for new rings that I can paint myself and reinstall. The lights give a nice clean look to the car and are actually so discreet that many people don't even realize they are different or non-stock (even when displaying my car at the last Caffeine & Exotics show).
  5. Greetings Has anyone had an opportunity to measure the vacuum level at the oil filler neck on a 997.2 3.6l, or have access to what the ideal value should be according to Porsche? I've seen lots on info on the 997.1 engines but there does not seem to be anything on the 997.2. Using a properly calibrated manometer, I got 13.9 in. H2O before an AOS replacement and now have 17 in. H2O after installing a new AOS. Car was running great before and actually feels even better now. As an interesting comparison I get 36 in. H2O on my Panamera GTS. Thanks in advance for any responses
  6. Cayenne S 957 V8 Crankshaft Position Sensor Replacement DIY About 3 weeks back I started getting a CEL with a Code 0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor "A" Circuit. Upper Limit Exceeded. After clearing the code it kept coming back within a day or two and the car stalled on two occasions. Based on research on the forums, this seemed very much in line with sensor failures on 955's and a DIY existed for these model years, but not the 957. My 957 now has around 120k miles, and the engine runs incredibly well, aside from this one recent anomaly. I ordered a replacement sensor, from Pelican Parts which arrived the next day (very impressive service) :lowdown: thanks Pelican Crankshaft Sensor Brand: Bosch Note: Engine Type: 4.8L 4806cc V8 (3.78x3.27; 96.0x83.0) (2008 Porsche Cayenne S Sport Utility) Part #: 0-261-210-292-INT As there was no info available on this DIY for a 957 so I'm hoping the following will help others get this done easily when needed, and in particular so you can save the 2 hours extra it took me to figure out where and how everything was located, as well as how to get to it. Which I did while I was waiting for the new part to arrive However once that research was done, the actual job of replacing the sensor took about 45 minutes. The main challenge is that the connector is difficult to access as it is behind and below the fuel pump on the right hand side as you face the front of the car. Even with an inspection scope it was difficult to locate. It was only once I looked from under the car that I could see where it was located. Also the connector plug is attached to a rectangular section of plastic tubing/conduit on the wiring harness, by a clip which is very rigid. After multiple attempts to release this clip it broke off. I think give the location it gets very hot and over the years becomes brittle. You should remove the engine compartment trim at the rear of the engine for better access. I also borrowed a few pics of an engine on the web to mark the location: I also found that removing the harness from the engine made it easier to get my hands around the connector to get the two ends separated. Once you have the old sensor disconnected, attach the new one and and tape the end of the new sensor tip with some painters tape just for protection and slowly lower it down into the engine compartment. It will end up either side of the primary cat where it is easily accessible from below. Also let the old sensor cable drop into the engine bay as you will then extract it from below. Now move to underneath the vehicle. I only needed to jack up the front left of the vehicle (jack stand + jack for extra safety). No wheels need to be removed. Do not jack up the car before dealing with the connector at the top of the engine bay as it will make it difficult to reach. Between the connector and the sensor, the cable is secured at 3 locations. See pictures below. The cable is pretty easy to remove and secure from below the vehicle and it can be seen and accessed without removing any of the under trays (depending on your level of flexibility). The lowest retaining clip is a push in type retaining clip where you simply press the cable into the tensioned clip. The two upper retaining clips are circular in shape and hinge open and closed. With a built of gentle persuasion you can pull them open and the cable comes out easily. I could not get the uppermost one in the pics but it is similar to the 2nd one shown in the pics. The sensor is held in place with a single torx T5 screw. Once you have the old sensor off you can pull it out and put it aside and attach the new one. I suggest attaching the sensor first and the attaching the cable to the retaining clips. Very rewarding and inexpensive fix, and everything is back to normal. No more codes and the car runs beautifully! Author EMC2 Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 07/15/2016 07:28 PM  
  7. About 3 weeks back I started getting a CEL with a Code 0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor "A" Circuit. Upper Limit Exceeded. After clearing the code it kept coming back within a day or two and the car stalled on two occasions. Based on research on the forums, this seemed very much in line with sensor failures on 955's and a DIY existed for these model years, but not the 957. My 957 now has around 120k miles, and the engine runs incredibly well, aside from this one recent anomaly. I ordered a replacement sensor, from Pelican Parts which arrived the next day (very impressive service) :lowdown: thanks Pelican Crankshaft Sensor Brand: Bosch Note: Engine Type: 4.8L 4806cc V8 (3.78x3.27; 96.0x83.0) (2008 Porsche Cayenne S Sport Utility) Part #: 0-261-210-292-INT As there was no info available on this DIY for a 957 so I'm hoping the following will help others get this done easily when needed, and in particular so you can save the 2 hours extra it took me to figure out where and how everything was located, as well as how to get to it. Which I did while I was waiting for the new part to arrive However once that research was done, the actual job of replacing the sensor took about 45 minutes. The main challenge is that the connector is difficult to access as it is behind and below the fuel pump on the right hand side as you face the front of the car. Even with an inspection scope it was difficult to locate. It was only once I looked from under the car that I could see where it was located. Also the connector plug is attached to a rectangular section of plastic tubing/conduit on the wiring harness, by a clip which is very rigid. After multiple attempts to release this clip it broke off. I think give the location it gets very hot and over the years becomes brittle. You should remove the engine compartment trim at the rear of the engine for better access. I also borrowed a few pics of an engine on the web to mark the location: I also found that removing the harness from the engine made it easier to get my hands around the connector to get the two ends separated. Once you have the old sensor disconnected, attach the new one and and tape the end of the new sensor tip with some painters tape just for protection and slowly lower it down into the engine compartment. It will end up either side of the primary cat where it is easily accessible from below. Also let the old sensor cable drop into the engine bay as you will then extract it from below. Now move to underneath the vehicle. I only needed to jack up the front left of the vehicle (jack stand + jack for extra safety). No wheels need to be removed. Do not jack up the car before dealing with the connector at the top of the engine bay as it will make it difficult to reach. Between the connector and the sensor, the cable is secured at 3 locations. See pictures below. The cable is pretty easy to remove and secure from below the vehicle and it can be seen and accessed without removing any of the under trays (depending on your level of flexibility). The lowest retaining clip is a push in type retaining clip where you simply press the cable into the tensioned clip. The two upper retaining clips are circular in shape and hinge open and closed. With a built of gentle persuasion you can pull them open and the cable comes out easily. I could not get the uppermost one in the pics but it is similar to the 2nd one shown in the pics. The sensor is held in place with a single torx T5 screw. Once you have the old sensor off you can pull it out and put it aside and attach the new one. I suggest attaching the sensor first and the attaching the cable to the retaining clips. Very rewarding and inexpensive fix, and everything is back to normal. No more codes and the car runs beautifully!
  8. Very interesting - thanks for the follow up Doug. That's precisely what my Durametric scan shows as well.
  9. Hi Doug Thanks for the reply. Did your phantom fault have a code or only the red exclamation symbol?
  10. Loren - a 1 month update: Car has been running perfectly. I checked with Durametric again yesterday and there are no fault codes active. the only thing that remains is what I said in post 12: "red exclamation symbol under Vehicle Electrical System (part no. 7L.593.704.9A) , but no fault codes are present." I'll run another scan in a couple of weeks and update the thread again.
  11. Thanks - this is a good point also - I had cleaned the throttle body and MAF about a year back, just for maintenance purposes. All was good there. I think this issue was definitely an electrical "glitch"
  12. A quick update. There appears to be no parasitic drain occurring on the battery. All electrical Fault codes are now cleared after a week of driving, however: When I run a Durametric scan I get the red exclamation symbol under Vehicle Electrical System (part no. 7L.593.704.9A) , but no fault codes are present. I'm going to give it another week and see if that clears by itself also. Apart from that one strange event a week ago, the car has been operating flawlessly. A mystery indeed...
  13. Quick update. I could not detect any shorts from the battery terminals to Ground. I also took the battery to get tested and it checked out fine. The only remaining code on the car is 1117 and the description still says Fault NOT currently active. I called Durametric and they explained that often these kinds of codes cannot be "force" cleared and that the vehicle needs to go through a specific drive cycle before the system clears itself of any codes. I was familiar with this type of scenario for Emissions testing from other Porsche's when the car can have a "NOT READY" status and has to be driven up to 100 miles before being ready and compliant for an emissions test. Whilst I hope this was just a one off event and the fault will clear itself, my next steps tomorrow will be: 1) check for any abnormal AC Voltage at the battery terminals (to determine if there is a diode issue in the alternator) 2) perform a parasitic current drain test as a precautionary measure
  14. Thanks Loren. No 3rd party add ons. I checked all the fuses and no problems there. I haven't had a chance to get to the battery yet but I ran another durametric scan. Very interestingly the 1117 code is still there but it now states that the fault is NOT currently active, whereas yesterday it was showing as active. The 1494 code remains there and is unchanged in the description also (i.e. still NOT active). Both fault codes (1117 and 1494) still will not clear. I also ran an output test with the durametric to independently test all circuits on the vehicle electrical system and every step (including all lights) passed without a glitch. I am now also wondering if there is an issue with Durametric not being able to clear these codes despite the fact that the faults are not active? As soon as the car is back I'll be checking for any short via the battery terminals. More to follow...
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