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Considering a 2011 Cayenne purchase.

I am trying to understand how the new lower gear (Tip 8 speed) in the 2011 Cayenne (and S) compensates for the elimination of a low range transfer case. Are the low gear ratios (and transfer ratios) available anywhere for the 2010 and 2011 models so I can compare. A related question: when might the 2011 Cayenne user manual become available here?

We are not planning on using the Cayenne like a Wrangler --- on the other hand we do go out in the desert and there are times when being able to crawl can really help (and not beat up tires, etc.) So I am trying to understand what the changes imply.

Thanks for any info.

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I'm in the same boat as yourself and have emailed several Porsche dealers with no reply to any of my questions. If one them happens to come through I'll post any replies.

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I'm in the same boat as yourself and have emailed several Porsche dealers with no reply to any of my questions. If one them happens to come through I'll post any replies.

I am not holding out much hope if the Canadian dealers are as well informed (ahem!) as in the US.

I doubt the lowering of the ratio of the lowest gear is more than 20% or so and that can't compensate directly for not having a 1:2 transfer case. On the other hand the new Tiptronics seems to be addressing low speed with a special pump to make sure the fluid pressure is high enough at low RPMs. One might hope that the viscous coupling could allow a very low speed crawl with enough torque to get over rocks or whatever.

So, i guess my real question is what does the new 2011 manual have to say about this.

BTW, it is really a shame that these very off-road capable machines are mostly used to shuffle around the suburbs.

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I had a chance to look at a 2011 manual. It does not explicitly address the "crawling" issue but it discusses off-road for several pages, including discussions of situations where very low speed crossing of obstacles is required. It would seem that pretty much anything I might want to do is possible. (No, I am not planning on taking a Cayenne on the Rubicon trail). But there is no explicit statement and I still am curious how the new Cayennes compare to previous models with a low range transfer case.

On a related topic, rather interesting in the manual was the first bullet under "Rules for off-road driving":

"Ensure vehicle is equipped with approved all-terrain tires."

This would be hard to do since Porsche has not made available nor approved any all-terrain tires. In the US all-season tires come standard -- that's not the same as all-terrain. As has been discussed on earlier threads, it is virtually impossible to find all-terrain tires for Cayennes. The issue on the rather rocky roads one might find out here in the western US is punctures. I guess the solution is to carry a second real spare in addition to the inflatable.

Also interesting, if I am reading the German Cayenne brochure correctly, in Germany the standard tire is a summer performance tire and an all season tire is available as a no cost option. Just the reverse of the US. Priority goes to over 150 mph autobahn driving...

The flip side of these cars being so broadly excellent, from high performance track to rather extreme over-road, is that the manufacturer seems to be a bit schizophrenic about marketing them and about how to instruct its customers.

Edited by tomnash

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I'm in the same boat as yourself and have emailed several Porsche dealers with no reply to any of my questions. If one them happens to come through I'll post any replies.

I am not holding out much hope if the Canadian dealers are as well informed (ahem!) as in the US.

I doubt the lowering of the ratio of the lowest gear is more than 20% or so and that can't compensate directly for not having a 1:2 transfer case. On the other hand the new Tiptronics seems to be addressing low speed with a special pump to make sure the fluid pressure is high enough at low RPMs.

One might hope that the viscous coupling could allow a very low speed crawl with enough torque to get over rocks or whatever.

Haven't I read somewhere that both the 2011 997 C4 model and the Cayenne now use the electromechanical clutch as in the Ford Escape F/awd for coupling in the front drive, VARIABLY coupling...?

So, i guess my real question is what does the new 2011 manual have to say about this.

BTW, it is really a shame that these very off-road capable machines are mostly used to shuffle around the suburbs.

A Shame...??

No, NOT, more safety aspects for them and YOU on wintertime adverse roadbed conditions.

That's why the transfer case and the low range is being dropped from the product, 98% of the driver's have no need and the remaining 2% only have need rarely.

Going off-roading, buy a 4runner...!

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Our 2011 Cayenne has three pedals on the floor.  The low range used in the first generation Cayenne are now part of the Mark's design history.  The current system is full time rear wheel drive and no longer has the dual range system used in earlier models.  Even with the manual transmission, engagement of all wheel drive is made electronically by a switch on the console.  Yes, I ordered the locking rear axle, a must if you want to get where you intended going.  That said, four wheel drive is still what it has always been, a way to find yourself stuck in deeper snow.  Know your limitations and go forth and explore till your hearts content. 

 

What I have found is that by using the sport sunction on the console, I really have no need to routinely engage first gear, except for pulling a hill or a stump.  First gear is now like the old grandma gear, and everything above that is normal gearing for handling the chores of your preferred driving habits.  At first I was miffed that there was no longer the old low range gears.  After all these years, I don't know what I was concerned about.  It was a change for which Porsche never announced the details about before hand, ownership was the way the word was made known. 

 

Soooooo, look for pre-2011 Cayenne's if your set on having lower gears throughout the shifting zones.  For my money, the improvements found in 2011 and later years was the right decision. 

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