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gordog

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About gordog

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    Member

Profile Fields

  • From
    AB, Canada
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    Macan
  • Future cars
    911
  • Former cars
    Fiat, BMW, Toyota, Mazda, Infiniti

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  1. 2017 Macan 2.0L Base Oil Change Remove the body panel located under the engine compartment by first removing the two large plastic push pin located near the rear corners of the panel using a screwdriver to carefully pry up the center locking pins. The center pins have to pull out almost ½”, so it’s easiest to use a thin screwdriver to pry up the pins to about ¼” prying slowly from each side, then use a 2 pronged trim removal tool or even a needle nose plier to pry it out the rest of the ½”. Then remove the 15 star drive (Torx) screws using a T25 Torx bit. It’s easiest to remove the front center (almost right between the front wheels) Torx screw last as this can hold up the panel while the other screws are removed. The panel is retained by the front air dam and rear pockets captured in other panels. Disengage the rear retaining flaps first, sliding the panel to the rear to disengage from the front air dam. Place your drain pan under the aluminum dry sump housing, and remove the drain plug using an 8mm hex (Allen) bit. Caution: the oil will be HOT if you recently ran the engine (even for a few minutes). ATTENTION!! DO NOT remove the rear drain plug which is located on the black pan near the black X-brace as this is the drain for the PDK Transmission fluid. Drain the oil pan being sure to remove the crush washer from the drain plug which may still be sticking to the oil pan, or may have fallen into your drain pan. Allow most or all of the oil to drain before loosening the oil filter housing. Remove the filter housing with a 36mm socket or similar and allow the oil in the housing to drain. Quite a lot of oil initially dumps out of the housing, so make sure your drain pan is in place, and let the oil in the housing drain before completely removing it. Remove the filter, check for metal particles in the housing and clean the inner surface if necessary while you wait for everything to stop dripping. Remove the old O-Ring and install the new one, coating it with fresh oil. The filter that I removed from the Macan was a Mahle OX 254 which is the same as the filter I purchased from Rock Auto which omes with a new O-Ring. If the new filter is too tight, before installing the new filter, "condition" it by inserting a 27mm socket or similar in each end to stretch out the hole slightly. This stretching may allow you to push the filter on further allowing the threads of the housing to mate easier but try not to get carried away. I simply stretched the holes on each end of the filter carefully with my fingers. Torque to 13 to 18 lb.-ft. (216 in-lb). Remember, this is an O-Ring sealed system, so the actual seal isn’t dependent on how tight you screw things together! Just slightly beyond snug is probably good enough if you aren’t using a torque wrench. Wipe the plug and the oil pan with a clean towel and replace the crush washer with a new one: p/n 900 123 152 30 (21.8mm OD 16.3mm ID x 1.4mm aluminum). Torque the drain plug to 18 lb.-ft (216 in-lb) Locate the oil fill cap under the hood and slowly refill the engine with 8.45 quarts (8 litres) 4.7 liters of oil. To avoid a mess or spills, a funnel may be used. Note: It’s best practice to under fill by about ½ litre, then after checking your warm engine, slowly add oil as required. Slightly less oil is much better than an over-filled engine! A minimum of 6 miles (10km) may need to be driven before a reading will show on the MDF. Get the engine up to running temperature, stop on level ground, shut off engine, wait 2 minutes, then obtain a reading from the MFD. Author gordog Category Macan (95B) - Maintenance Submitted 09/14/2015 09:36 AM Updated 05/23/2017 06:10 AM  
  2. Remove the body panel located under the engine compartment by first removing the two large plastic push pin located near the rear corners of the panel using a screwdriver to carefully pry up the center locking pins. The center pins have to pull out almost ½”, so it’s easiest to use a thin screwdriver to pry up the pins to about ¼” prying slowly from each side, then use a 2 pronged trim removal tool or even a needle nose plier to pry it out the rest of the ½”. Then remove the 15 star drive (Torx) screws using a T25 Torx bit. It’s easiest to remove the front center (almost right between the front wheels) Torx screw last as this can hold up the panel while the other screws are removed. The panel is retained by the front air dam and rear pockets captured in other panels. Disengage the rear retaining flaps first, sliding the panel to the rear to disengage from the front air dam. Place your drain pan under the aluminum dry sump housing, and remove the drain plug using an 8mm hex (Allen) bit. Caution: the oil will be HOT if you recently ran the engine (even for a few minutes). ATTENTION!! DO NOT remove the rear drain plug which is located on the black pan near the black X-brace as this is the drain for the PDK Transmission fluid. Drain the oil pan being sure to remove the crush washer from the drain plug which may still be sticking to the oil pan, or may have fallen into your drain pan. Allow most or all of the oil to drain before loosening the oil filter housing. Remove the filter housing with a 36mm socket or similar and allow the oil in the housing to drain. Quite a lot of oil initially dumps out of the housing, so make sure your drain pan is in place, and let the oil in the housing drain before completely removing it. Remove the filter, check for metal particles in the housing and clean the inner surface if necessary while you wait for everything to stop dripping. Remove the old O-Ring and install the new one, coating it with fresh oil. The filter that I removed from the Macan was a Mahle OX 254 which is the same as the filter I purchased from Rock Auto which omes with a new O-Ring. If the new filter is too tight, before installing the new filter, "condition" it by inserting a 27mm socket or similar in each end to stretch out the hole slightly. This stretching may allow you to push the filter on further allowing the threads of the housing to mate easier but try not to get carried away. I simply stretched the holes on each end of the filter carefully with my fingers. Torque to 13 to 18 lb.-ft. (216 in-lb). Remember, this is an O-Ring sealed system, so the actual seal isn’t dependent on how tight you screw things together! Just slightly beyond snug is probably good enough if you aren’t using a torque wrench. Wipe the plug and the oil pan with a clean towel and replace the crush washer with a new one: p/n 900 123 152 30 (21.8mm OD 16.3mm ID x 1.4mm aluminum). Torque the drain plug to 18 lb.-ft (216 in-lb) Locate the oil fill cap under the hood and slowly refill the engine with 8.45 quarts (8 litres) 4.7 liters of oil. To avoid a mess or spills, a funnel may be used. Note: It’s best practice to under fill by about ½ litre, then after checking your warm engine, slowly add oil as required. Slightly less oil is much better than an over-filled engine! A minimum of 6 miles (10km) may need to be driven before a reading will show on the MDF. Get the engine up to running temperature, stop on level ground, shut off engine, wait 2 minutes, then obtain a reading from the MFD.
  3. Thank-you Thank-you. This was the type of information that I was looking for. I was concerned re the lack of feedback other than the suspect ones on the vendor's websites as well as technical support post sale. PM sent.
  4. So far the general consensus is to stay away from the Chinese PIWIS Tester II and just go with the Durametric? If I purchase the Durametric, I was told by them to just get the Enthusiast version. If more cars need to be added over the 3 car limit, it can just be traded in for the difference in the future. Still would like real-world feedback from those that have tried the Chinese PIWIS Tester II however.
  5. Thank-you for your response. I usually keep my cars for at least 10 years, so the cost per year isn't bad for either the Professional DM or the PIWIS II. And I'm not sure if the PIWIS II has a limit on the number of cars it will access. Regardless, Durametric told me that it still won't allow servicing the parking brake, etc. I've heard some anecdotal issue somewhere from someone selling a used PIWIS about how he read that someone bought one of the Chinese PIWIS models and they had to go through the CC company to get his money back as it didn't work for him. I'm really hoping that someone here has actual experience with the PIWIS Tester II as I haven't read much that's been written by an actual owner of one. I don't trust feedback ratings from a vendor's site.
  6. I posted this on the MacanForum, and it was suggested that I ask the very knowledgeable people over here. I tried a search, but couldn't quite find what I was looking for. I'm trying to decide between the PIWIS Tester II from http://www.uobd2.net/ and the Durametric. Apparently the Durametric will not reset the electronic parking brake for service, and some have said on other Porsche forums that the PIWIS Tester II can do much more. For those that know or have done research in the past, or have owned one of these, does the Piwis Tester II absolutely require up-dates to work, or just when you want to access other features? Do these Chinese products work at all? I'm hoping it will be able adjust the level reading of the Oil Level display (mine's off, and the dealership says they can't do it), show the fill level when changing oil, as well as allow servicing the rear electronic parking brake. Since uobd2.net is a Chinese company, I'm not sure how trustworthy they are in giving accurate information about their products. Any one here have the PIWIS Tester II or at least tried it? It's about 3 times more expensive than the basic Durametric, but if it can at least reliably do a few more things, I thought it might be worth it. Any other opinions?
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