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Stefan

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About Stefan

  • Rank
    Contributing Member

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  • Gender
    Male

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  • From
    Boston, MA USA
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    1999 Porsche Boxster
  • Former cars
    1986 Porsche 944 Turbo

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  1. Actually, the purpose and function of a fast idle cam and the idle control valve are quite different. A fast idle cam reduces air coming into a cold engine to make a richer mixture when the engine isn't hot enough to efficiently vaporize fuel. When the engine is warm, the fast idle cam ceases to function. The idle control valve allows air into a (hot or cold) engine whenever the throttle is closed. The reason the ICV has its name is that the amount of air it lets in is regulated by feedback from the engine speed in order to maintain idle at a specific RPM.
  2. eGas replaces the ICV and all Boxsters 2000 or later have eGas. eGas cars have a computer-controlled throttle (as opposed to a throttle that is connected to the gas pedal via a wire). Because the computer can hold the throttle slightly open to allow enough air in during idle, the car doesn't need a separate valve for that. Cleaning the throttle body will likely solve your problem.
  3. While you're ordering parts don't forget to get replacement bump stops and bellows. They don't come with the kit. (Parts #8 & #9 in attached image)
  4. I can't find the original pics for this but this writeup seems to be solving the same problem in almost exactly the same way. http://rainydaymagazine.com/wp/2014/04/28/boxster-hardtop-fix/ Good luck!
  5. Your comments are rife with incorrect information but since it is completely devoid of relevance I don't need to address any of it.
  6. 1) I am making very specific technical (non-personal) points which have not been refuted. 2) I discourage the use of all magnetic drain plugs, not just from some manufacturer 3) I do not and never had an axe to grind with either of these two manufacturers 4) Your points are based solely on fallacies (ad hominem attack, irrelevant authority, appeal to spite, appeal to fear) 5) Having a bias does not mean you're wrong. But it does mean that you have a motive for believing/reporting inaccurate or incorrect information. -- If anyone is interested in understanding more about why JFP's arguments are invalid, here is an industry-standard paper which describes why every point he has just made is fallacious (http://records.viu.ca/www/ipp/pdf/42_fallacies.pdf). I'd be happy to discuss the technical merits since this conversation is not about people but about cars.
  7. This is what we have oil filters for. There is nothing a magnetic drain plug would pick up that the filter wouldn't stop. It is trivially easy to check for metal particles in the filter when you change your oil. And if you want to be super anal you can check for sediment in the drained oil. To make things worse, many of the drain plugs (LN, for example) use a harder-than-stock metal for the threads, which is exactly what you don't want. The material on the stock part is deliberately soft so that any misthreading will sacrifice the $1 drain plug and not the hundreds-of-$ drain pan. Hence, all magnetic drain plugs are a worse complete waste of money; they are a risk. I have never heard of a single credible unbiased report that suggests otherwise. Most positive reviews are from people who profit from their sale, people who want to justify a purchase they've already made, or people parroting those other people. Caveat emptor.
  8. Sounds like your starter bendix is sticking. If that's it, take out the starter and lube the bendix and you'll be good. No need to replace anything. Common problem.
  9. If you're going to regularly replace the bearing then why not just use the stock one? It's cheaper and many more people have used it than LN.
  10. The electrical potion is widely available, just not from Porsche. It is $8.65 on AutoHausAz.com (part #4A0905849B), for example.
  11. Try pushing down on the oil filler cap while it's hunting and see if the problem stops.
  12. Lie under the car with your feet towards the front of the car, chest under the bleeder, head behind the bleeder. Reach up from behind and it is easily accessible.
  13. It's the ignition switch. It could be either the $8 electrical part on the end (about 5-15 minutes to change with a small screwdriver) or the $120 mechanical part (about an hour to change with a couple of wrenches).
  14. Anyone considering signing some agreement with a far-off person in an attempt to recover their money should first have a local trusted lawyer go over the contract with a fine-tooth comb. There are ways they could make you forfeit your right to recover your money if they "try" and fail. No offense intended to anyone involved, just be careful folks.
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