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medtech

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About medtech

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    Contributing Member

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    Male

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  • From
    Cali
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    2002 986 S
  • Future cars
    Nothin but Porsche
  • Former cars
    Rx-8

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  1. I just purchased an EVOMS CAI unit used. Got it installed. But I have a Tip and now I'm left with this open breather hose flappin in the wind. EVO instructions mention the breather hose, but don't tell u what to do w/ it after the airbox is removed. Can I just cap it?? Would Kragen have some type of cap that would work? Thanks, A
  2. Some A-hole rear-ended me last week. To me it looked like minor cosmetic, but the body shop came back w/ $8k of repairs. I remember reading a post about submitting a claim to insurance for the diminished value of a P-car after an accident. I can't find that post, but it mentioned a website or company that even provides devalued estimates to submit (I think). Does anyone know what I am talking about, or have I been sniffing 91 octane too much? Thanks, Medtech
  3. DIY FRONT BRAKE JOB Total elapsed time including jacking, wheel removal and the job itself was 90 minutes I ordered the rotors from Sunset and the ceramic pads from Pap-parts. Due to manufacturing differences we have seen, you must determine the size of the rotors on your vehicle prior to ordering. The easiest way to figure out your brake size (other than actually measuring the diameter of your rotors) is to look at the caliper. It should have "17ZR" or "18ZR" cast into the body. 17ZR=330mm (black caliper), 18ZR=350mm (red caliper). You can probably see this with the wheel mounted to the vehicle, but you may have to remove the wheel - but it's much less trouble (and cheaper) than returning a set of incorrect rotors/pads. This is the definitive brake pad/ brake rotor DIY page (for boxster) but a great primer to read before you tackle the job. http://www.bombaydigital.com/boxster/projects/brakes/ Tools you will need: Jack & Stands Torque Wrenches 10ft/lbs to 200ft/lbs 19 mm socket for wheel bolts 13mm Socket for the Retaining Bolt Torx-50 for the Rotor Brake Parts Cleaner (do not use other cleaners) Needle Nose Pliers Punch (for driving the pins out) Hammer or soft mallet Caliper Spreader or large Water Pump Pliers Note: The brake pads must be replaced (both sets of pads per axle) if the brake pad warning indicator lights up, but no later than when there is a residual pad thickness of 2 mm. If brake pad wear is indicated by the warning light, the warning contact sensor (sender including wire and plug connection) must also be replaced. ($9.95 per wheel at sunset) Replacing the warning contact sensor can be avoided by replacing the brake pads no later than when the pad thickness is 2.5 mm. Warning contact sensors with a worn wire core must be replaced. However, if only the plastic part of the warning contact is worn, replacement is not necessary. Also, do not disassemble the caliper when changing the vibration dampers (or painting the calipers) as Porsche does not sell inner seal kits. . Jack up the vehicle at the lift points provided and remove the wheel (you will need to do this for each wheel). . Link: http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=21396 Front Pad Replacement . Remove the retainer with a 13mm socket (arrow) and extract the retainer pin inwards. (#9 in the diagram) . . . A single bolt hold the pad retaining pin in place, as usual with fluid locked bolts tighten a fraction to break the seal and then remove as normal. Leave the bolt in couple of turns and tap the end to start the pin on its way through. . . Pull out the warning contact wire on the brake caliper and remove the warning contacts from the brake pad plates._ Once the pin is out, break the sensor wires , its easier. . . Remove brake pads with a brake pad puller or use the water pump Pliers to spread the pads. . . . If necessary, carefully push back the piston to its original position. . . Insert the brake pads._Caution: The pad backing plates (rear side of the brake pads) must not be greased._Note: If you are using Pagid (or some other 3rd party pads) you will likely have to drill the pad for the wear sensors. Just look at the old pads and drill the sensor holes in the same location._ . To get the new pads in you will find that depressing one of the pistons is easy, the second ok the third forces out the other 2. I found the easiest way was to depress the first 2 and then slip the pad in, with the pad blocking the first 2 depress the third and push the pad into place. Its not hard just fiddly. . Fit new expanding spring, new retaining pin and new retainer (retaining bracket). These parts are available as a repair set and must be 'renewed' each time the pads are changed. $30 for a set You really need three hands to put the pin back through. The best way is to depress the pad retaining spring and tap the pin through, for the last part you will need to push the pin itself into line. Dont forget to get blue loctite for the pin bolt and brake grease for the back of the pad. . . Insert the warning contact wire and warning contacts. . The sensors clip in with the thick part pad side. . . Remove the old sensor connector by inserting a screwdriver into the tab opening in the middle. At the same time pull down on the bottom portion of the connector. The old connector should slide off easily and then just slip the new one on. . . Firmly press the brake pedal several times with the vehicle stationary so that the brake pads assume their fit in accordance with the operating state. Next, check and, if necessary, correct the brake fluid level.__Bedding in the brake pads_New brake pads require a bedding-in period of approximately 125 miles. Not until then do they achieve their best friction and wear coefficient. During this period, the brakes should be subjected to full stress only in emergencies when traveling at high speed. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Torque settings: FROM LOREN: Brake caliper to front wheel carrier M16 x 1.5 270 Nm (200 ftlb.) Brake caliper to rear wheel carrier M14 x 1.5 180 Nm (133 ftlb.) Brake disc to wheel hub (front and rear axles) M12 x 1.5 14 Nm (10.5 ftlb.) Plug rear brake disc 14 Nm (10.5 ftlb.) Brake cover plate to front axle M8 x 12 20 Nm (15 ftlb.) Brake caliper to rear wheel carrier: M8 x 16 20 Nm (15 ftlb.) M6 x 12 8 Nm(6 ftlb.) Many thanks and props to Loren and Mudman who generated the pics and info. I have compiled them, with their permission, to a somewhat comprehensive DIY for the Cayenne. I am sure I have missed some things which will get covered in the thread. I hope this inspires someone new to try this job, it's not that difficult, and saves a lot of money in stealership labor. Medtech :)
  4. Cayenne Front Pads and Rotors DIY DIY FRONT BRAKE JOB Total elapsed time including jacking, wheel removal and the job itself was 90 minutes I ordered the rotors from Sunset and the ceramic pads from Pap-parts. Due to manufacturing differences we have seen, you must determine the size of the rotors on your vehicle prior to ordering. The easiest way to figure out your brake size (other than actually measuring the diameter of your rotors) is to look at the caliper. It should have "17ZR" or "18ZR" cast into the body. 17ZR=330mm (black caliper), 18ZR=350mm (red caliper). You can probably see this with the wheel mounted to the vehicle, but you may have to remove the wheel - but it's much less trouble (and cheaper) than returning a set of incorrect rotors/pads. This is the definitive brake pad/ brake rotor DIY page (for boxster) but a great primer to read before you tackle the job. http://www.bombaydigital.com/boxster/projects/brakes/ Tools you will need: Jack & Stands Torque Wrenches 10ft/lbs to 200ft/lbs 19 mm socket for wheel bolts 13mm Socket for the Retaining Bolt Torx-50 for the Rotor Brake Parts Cleaner (do not use other cleaners) Needle Nose Pliers Punch (for driving the pins out) Hammer or soft mallet Caliper Spreader or large Water Pump Pliers Note: The brake pads must be replaced (both sets of pads per axle) if the brake pad warning indicator lights up, but no later than when there is a residual pad thickness of 2 mm. If brake pad wear is indicated by the warning light, the warning contact sensor (sender including wire and plug connection) must also be replaced. ($9.95 per wheel at sunset) Replacing the warning contact sensor can be avoided by replacing the brake pads no later than when the pad thickness is 2.5 mm. Warning contact sensors with a worn wire core must be replaced. However, if only the plastic part of the warning contact is worn, replacement is not necessary. Also, do not disassemble the caliper when changing the vibration dampers (or painting the calipers) as Porsche does not sell inner seal kits. . Jack up the vehicle at the lift points provided and remove the wheel (you will need to do this for each wheel). . Link: http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=21396 Front Pad Replacement . Remove the retainer with a 13mm socket (arrow) and extract the retainer pin inwards. (#9 in the diagram) . . . A single bolt hold the pad retaining pin in place, as usual with fluid locked bolts tighten a fraction to break the seal and then remove as normal. Leave the bolt in couple of turns and tap the end to start the pin on its way through. . . Pull out the warning contact wire on the brake caliper and remove the warning contacts from the brake pad plates._ Once the pin is out, break the sensor wires , its easier. . . Remove brake pads with a brake pad puller or use the water pump Pliers to spread the pads. . . . If necessary, carefully push back the piston to its original position. . . Insert the brake pads._Caution: The pad backing plates (rear side of the brake pads) must not be greased._Note: If you are using Pagid (or some other 3rd party pads) you will likely have to drill the pad for the wear sensors. Just look at the old pads and drill the sensor holes in the same location._ . To get the new pads in you will find that depressing one of the pistons is easy, the second ok the third forces out the other 2. I found the easiest way was to depress the first 2 and then slip the pad in, with the pad blocking the first 2 depress the third and push the pad into place. Its not hard just fiddly. . Fit new expanding spring, new retaining pin and new retainer (retaining bracket). These parts are available as a repair set and must be 'renewed' each time the pads are changed. $30 for a set You really need three hands to put the pin back through. The best way is to depress the pad retaining spring and tap the pin through, for the last part you will need to push the pin itself into line. Dont forget to get blue loctite for the pin bolt and brake grease for the back of the pad. . . Insert the warning contact wire and warning contacts. . The sensors clip in with the thick part pad side. . . Remove the old sensor connector by inserting a screwdriver into the tab opening in the middle. At the same time pull down on the bottom portion of the connector. The old connector should slide off easily and then just slip the new one on. . . Firmly press the brake pedal several times with the vehicle stationary so that the brake pads assume their fit in accordance with the operating state. Next, check and, if necessary, correct the brake fluid level.__Bedding in the brake pads_New brake pads require a bedding-in period of approximately 125 miles. Not until then do they achieve their best friction and wear coefficient. During this period, the brakes should be subjected to full stress only in emergencies when traveling at high speed. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Torque settings: FROM LOREN: Brake caliper to front wheel carrier M16 x 1.5 270 Nm (200 ftlb.) Brake caliper to rear wheel carrier M14 x 1.5 180 Nm (133 ftlb.) Brake disc to wheel hub (front and rear axles) M12 x 1.5 14 Nm (10.5 ftlb.) Plug rear brake disc 14 Nm (10.5 ftlb.) Brake cover plate to front axle M8 x 12 20 Nm (15 ftlb.) Brake caliper to rear wheel carrier: M8 x 16 20 Nm (15 ftlb.) M6 x 12 8 Nm(6 ftlb.) Many thanks and props to Loren and Mudman who generated the pics and info. I have compiled them, with their permission, to a somewhat comprehensive DIY for the Cayenne. I am sure I have missed some things which will get covered in the thread. I hope this inspires someone new to try this job, it's not that difficult, and saves a lot of money in stealership labor. Medtech :) Author medtech Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Maintenance Submitted 08/29/2008 08:28 PM Updated 03/14/2017 07:08 AM  
  5. Abraxas, I would like you to have performance & save money. Since you already have an exhaust that flows well and sounds good you don't need to do anything else there. As far as the intake, I would highly suggest the BMC F1 free flow filter for $110. It seems too simple but it works great. You will get much better sound and better throttle response (especially on a tiptronic). I think it has just as much if not more surface area than the EVOMS CAI (I haven't measured them). If you take out your stock airbox and look at it up close you will see that it is very well designed and has all the elements of a CAI already built into it. It sucks cold air in via the snorkel, and it that's not enough air then it has holes drilled in the bottom. It's huge! And I suppose if you wanted even more airflow you could probably cut away a corner and cover it with mesh. Personally, I ordered the EVOMS CAI, and after taking apart the stock airbox, I sent it back. Take the other $400 you would have spent on the CAI and spend it on a suspension upgrade. Good Luck! A :renntech:
  6. Ok, found the Hawk dustless at Pap-parts.com Do you know what size/type the bolt is that holds the rotor on? Is it a Torx?
  7. Mudman, Do you have a good supplier for the rotors and pads? A
  8. I put Darin's Stage II (MKI) on my 3.6 a few weeks ago and it sounds great! no excessive vibration and not too loud. I think this should be STOCK on all P-cars! :)
  9. They are supposed to come with gaskets?? :o That's another thing those a-holes left out! Who packs their boxes, Chimps?
  10. Jim, You can definitely do it! Check out this link! http://www.avic411.com/forum/viewtopic.php...hlight=mivey911 The problem with any aftermarket stereo is the stupid fiberoptic Bose amp. To my knowledge there is no way to go from RCA to fiberoptic. This means you have to replace the Bose amp and then of course you may run into issues with the crappy Bose speakers. Good news is, once you rip all that junk out you never have to worry about it again! B) Aaron
  11. Definitely recommended!! I plan to do it myself very soon.
  12. Hey Miks, Do you have any sound bites of this set-up? I'd love to hear it! Medtech :D
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