Jump to content

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Stakeman

Members
  • Content Count

    22
  • Donations

    $0.00 
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Stakeman

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Fields

  • From
    Spring, Tx
  • Porsche Club
    No
  • Present cars
    1999 996
  1. I was under the impression that *all* 1999 cars was double row IMS, that 2000 was a mix, and 2001-2005 cars had single row IMS. Indeed that should be the reason why the early cars have far less failures on this matter. The bore score issue also favours early cars for quite other reasons :) Kind Regards Mine was a single row.. I wish I could post a couple of pics but I'm on a trip and don't have them with me, I took several of the job. Including a good one of the bearing after I pulled it and removed the seals.
  2. I have a 99 as well, with 43k. I did the retrofit myself with the LN. One thing I will say is the early 996 cars from what I've read are LESS inclined to fail. Most are single row, mine was. Before I ordered the new bearing I found the engine number on the case ans spoke with them about if I had a single or double row. I was told to pull the tranny first and look at the depth of the cover as an. Indicator as to if it was single or double row. That being said. Unless you have good reson to believe your bearing is failing I would not worry about failure. What prompted me to do it was after close inspection of my oil filter. I found some very fine metal in the filter. So I was worried about it enough to put in the LN. I really didn't find much debris but there was some where the bearing seats into the case. I also dropped the oil sump cover(oil pan) to inspect for debris and found none. The old bearing was in very good shape and had just slightly more slop than the new one. Bottom line it's up to you. If you have signs pointing toward a failure and can't sleep at night then go for it. After all was. Said and done I think mine could have gone another 50k and been fine. I enjoy wrenching on cars so I loved tearing it apart and finding out more about my car anyway. Best of luck with your decision.
  3. I've had this same problem for a while. I've searched the forums and have had the car up on jacks several times and can't find anything! I hate throwing money at it if I'm not sure where the problem is. If anyone feels like chiming in I'd be glad to hear from your experiences as well. And yes I've checked the usual suspects, drop links ect...
  4. Sounds like they have done a poor job of diagnosing and fixing the problem. The TSB is clear (as clear as Porsche can be) as what needs to be done and what tests are to be preformed to verify the problem is solved.Sounds like someone tried to just do the minimum. 99.9% of these problems can be solved by proper application of the work in the TSB.I agree 100%! Like I said, this was done prior to my buying the car and is in the service records. Funny the same dealership worked the problem.
  5. My car has been to the dealer 3X's for this prior to me buying the car. Several months after I bought the car it was popping the same codes! I really have little confidence Porsche has a handle on this fix! It is frustrating as an owner to chase these fixes to no avail! I'm at the point I'm about ready to pull the bulb and let it ride.
  6. I just replaced my mounts yesterday. I was really surprised how much they were sagging! My 99' only has 43k miles, but I think it may be a result of age more than wear. My passenger seat would vibrate while at idle at stop lights and it was driving me crazy. It really made a HUGE difference! I even think it shifts smoother now. I'll try to get a picture on here of the difference of the old and new one next to each other.
  7. +1 on the Fister type of mod. I in now way will discount his work, it does look like he does a flawless job. I did some research locally and found a shop that has a reputation for excellent exhaust work on high end cars. I showed them what I was looking for, saw some of their work and had them do the same thing for 100 bucks out the door. If you do a search there is no shortage of guys doing this mod. The most important thing is find a shop that does great welds. As far as removing the mufflers, I did mine with the bumper still on the car. It's a tight sqeeze but very doable.
  8. Come on Greg! We don't live in Japan, so why don't you give it a rest. I've seen your post on other threads... Don't hi-jack this one! I posted this in several threads because this problem is in common with 986s, 996s, 987s and 997s. Maybe you don't live in Japan, but one presumes you own a Porsche. So, if Porsche Japan is taking action on this, perhaps others can use this as leverage to get their local Porsche to act. Fair enough, and yeah... Since I'm the one who started this topic your presumptions would be correct. That being said, without any further information it really doesn't do a whole lot of good. I'm a new 996 owner myself and think anyone buying one needs to buy with their eyes wide open. There is no shortage of IMS stories on the web. I've even read a few where a US dealer replaced the bearing at no cost, but that certainly doesn't mean that's the norm. This issue has been around forever and I really don't see Porsche putting new bearings in 70k+ mile cars!
  9. Come on Greg! We don't live in Japan, so why don't you give it a rest. I've seen your post on other threads... Don't hi-jack this one!
  10. Let's see how it looks! I'm thinking of going with those lights.
  11. Next time I'm doing it your way for sure! I was almost at the point of pulling it back out to start the slave....Yes, it was that bad! For those doing this for the first time please learn from my mistake...
  12. You know I read about doing just that before I even attempted to install and intended to do that. But honestly I was apprehensive about lining up the bell housing bolts and stabbing in the tranny sooo..... let my better judgement slip and didn't do it! Next time I will for sure. Let me ask, even with the tranny down a few inches I really didn't see how it would yield much more room unless you leave it really low then jack it up. To me it looked like I'd have to have it at least 12 inches low to gain more room then I had concerns about pinching the line when jacking it into position. Thanks for the input, I'm interested in how low you were when putting the slave in and did the coiled up hard line get in the way when raising the tranny up?
  13. RRRUFF, most of the tools needed I had in my box. I do know one of the things I didn't have was a 36mm socket to remove and install the tensioners. I wish I would have payed more attention to what sizes everything was. I also bought new cam shaft end plugs(x2). I used a pick tool to remove the old ones and honestly...if you have some good clear silicone you could easily clean and repair the pin hole from removal. But for 13 bucks each I just went with the new plugs (I also used some thread sealer when installing the new ones). Make sure you have some LONG extensions for the bell housing bolts I used a 2 foot extension and once broke loose an air ratchet is a huge advantage. Make sure to remember which bolts go where as there are several different lengths, I used a piece of cardboard and drew out the pattern. As far as total time actually turning wrenches under the car??? Once in the air, tranny coming out took about 2 hours, clutch was another 45 minutes to an hour, cam locks removing tensioners and prepping/ cleaning block area for IMS bearing another hour or so.. The actual bearing pull and install did not take that long, I was very careful to follow the directions word for word....sometimes twice so it took longer than it had to. I'd say around an 1.5 hours. (you need to allow the new bearing to sit in the freezer overnight though). Going back together went real quick(with the exception of the slave cylinder) around 3 hours... Then the slave is the big unknown?? I spent a REAL long time jacking around with that! Like another 3+ hours...Did I mention it sucked? Total time? My best guess would be around 10 hours for me. Keep in mind this is not my daily driver and I spread this out over several days. By doing that I think it made the job more enjoyable, especially when dealing with the slave cylinder! I just walked away for a while and came back when I regained my patience! If you had "everything" you needed this can be done over a weekend, but for me personally I wouldn't have had as much fun. Best of luck, I'd do it again without a doubt!
  14. Sorry it took forever to get back to you krazyk! I don't have the packaging with the pn.. Basically I found the measurements and spline count and just matched it up with a micrometer from the store. It was so close I gave it a shot and the fit was perfect when I used it! I thought I may need to use some electrical tape to make the pilot bearing area a hair thicker but even with one wrap of tape it was way too thick... Sorry I couldn't be of more help.
  15. I was surprised how good the old bearing looked actually. There was a considerable amount of fine debris in the shaft area. The bearing itself looked good however there was some slop in the center stud so it was getting some wear. My car is a 99' with 43k. I really need to spend some time getting some pics up its a clean car, even better now with the LN upgrade.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.