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earlyapex

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About earlyapex

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    Member

Profile Fields

  • From
    CA
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    40th Anniversary 911
    01 A64.2
  • Former cars
    03 e46 M3
  1. The air cooled cars are holding their values nicely. The 993 C2S runs about $50,000 due to its relative rarity and big but that many find beautiful. You should take a look at the 87-89 Carrera. They have a very nice 3.2L motor and G50 transmission. This car really feels like a Porsche and nice examples run in the $20,000 range. You can find many 911SC a bit less. They have the 915 tranny which is not as bad as some say. I really love the look of the 73 911RS and quite a few owners have converted their cars to this specification. I just can't get excited about the 964 except for some nice RSA's which are really just low optioned C2's. So how viceral do you want to get? The early cars don't have a functional air conditioning system!
  2. Don't overlook the 986 or 987 Boxster. They are very fun to drive and quite comfortable. With two trunks, they can be surprisingly practical. The 993 C2S uses the turbo body, but retains RWD. They carry a tidy price premium over the regular C2. You'll have to drive one against a C2 to see if you like the way it drives. I also like some open top driving, but I do not like the way the 996 Targa looks so I would go for a cabriolet if this is the direction you want to go. Cabs. will cost a little more than their hard top brothers. I have to admit that I really like the way the 996 looks with its top down. I would recommend buying a car that is still under warranty and then buy an extended warranty. Repairs can be very expensive on any Porsche no matter what the model. It's nice if you can have a warranty cover the most expensive items, i.e. motor and drive train.
  3. With that budget, you can get almost anything you want except for the 993 TT, 996 TT, 996 GT3, 996 GT2. It all depends on your taste in Porsches. Their appearance versus their driving characteristics. The 996 C2 is a very nice car, comfortable, fast. The 996 C46 adds a modern AWD system and big brakes, but has a heavier steering feel. The 993 is the last of the air cooled Porsches and is more visceral than the 996. I like the look of the 993 C2S. These cars are getting old so you will have to search a bit to find the right one. I'd pass on the 964 unless you can find a 964 Cup car that hasn't been driven on the race track. In the end, I'd get a 02 or newer 996 C2. It's very comfortable and fun to drive. They are very reliable. The biggest issue is revolves around the Rear Main Seal. This has gotten very little public press, but is a popular topic on the internet. It's basically an oil leak due to how Porsche designed the M96 engine. They have come up with a 4th generation seal that hopefully fixes many of the leaks. Some cars that are out of spec. will need a new factory engine.
  4. TRG is a great organization that has many commitments. They may not be your best starting point. You are a tiny fish in a very big Porsche pond. Consider: http://www.scargoracing.com/ http://www.sharkwerks.com/main.php
  5. Great car. Unique combination of luxury options and performance enhancements.
  6. A 996 to 997 conversion was featured in the November 2005 issue of "Total 911". http://jacquemond.com/designbyjacquemond.htm
  7. I've yet to hear of an engine failure do to supercharging. It seams to be the most economical way to go if you want to make significant hp and torque improvements while maintaining drivability.
  8. There isn't very much information quoted from Autofarm in the article. I don't think this article significantly changes what is known about "RMS" leaks since a "RMS" leak has become a garbage dump term used to describe leaks from more than the RMS in the M96 engine. All this aside, Autofarm seems to be offering there expertise in rebuilding early M96 engines. It was only a matter of time before shops started taking these engines apart. I don't think you'll see this type of service offered for the M96 03 engines until a significant number start coming out of warranty. It remains to be seen if there solution, which was not revealed in detail, will be durable and cost less than an exchange motor from Porsche. A 3.8L conversion is interesting, but again it has yet to be tested by any of the major publications.
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