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iamtheari

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About iamtheari

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    Member

Profile Fields

  • From
    ND
  • Porsche Club
    No
  • Present cars
    1996 BMW R1100RS
  • Future cars
    964, 993, or 996
  • Former cars
    1985 911 Carrera Targa
  1. I was tempted to remove the bolts and put it in gear but thought better of it. I would worry that loosened bolts with forces applied by the rotating drive shaft would damage their threads in the differential flange.
  2. I foolishly did not try turning it between chisel sessions. That's a very good idea, thanks! I gave up when the chisel didn't get any purchase at all on the bottom side I was able to reach (about 45-60 degrees around the shaft). It'll be December before I have another weekend free to look at it but now I know what to try next.
  3. In my case, I had to give up because the rear flange would not separate even the tiniest bit from the differential even when I applied a hammer or cold chisel. It appears that the road salts in the car's previous state of residence have effectively welded these parts together. Fortunately, it seems that the vibration I had diagnosed as cardan shaft bearing issues is no longer there, so I am going to hold onto the new shaft in case it comes back someday, and then get out the air chisel to remove the old shaft.
  4. Do they salt the roads in Ohio? That's where the previous owner drove the vehicle prior to my recent acquisition. When I pry at that point, the protective cover comes off easily but the shaft itself does not come out of the flange. A corrosion weld is a definite possibility based on what I can see on the new shaft and the freedom of movement of the shaft fore and aft while the end piece remains stuck to the flange. I couldn't reach a hammer into the space available very well, so I used a wood block against the shaft and hammered that the best I could under the car. I also tried a chisel to gain a foothold between the shaft and the flange in the space marked, but to no avail. It does seem like there must be a magical angle or location to tap with a hammer and release it all based on others' experiences as compared to my own.
  5. Can you be more specific about how you pushed the shaft forward and where you applied the pry bar? I pried as hard as I could forward on the shaft with a 32mm wrench to no avail and I tried a cold chisel to separate the shaft from the differential flange but couldn't get any movement there, either. Some people have mentioned using an air chisel, which I want to avoid if I can. Most people agree that being gentle will get the job done, so I want to be gentle if I can. I've found with Porsches that there is often a magic place or angle to apply gentle force so I really appreciate tips on finding it for this one.
  6. Thanks for posting this DIY. Unfortunately, I am having a lot of trouble prying either end of the shaft loose. When I pry at the front, it's like the flex disc, shaft flange, and transfer case flange have all fused together and will not let go. When I pry at the rear, the metal cover moves just fine but nothing else does. The shaft itself moves a bit fore and aft, but my new shaft also moves relative to the metal piece that sticks into the rear differential so that doesn't help much. I don't see how I can get leverage against the part of the shaft that needs to be moved. Is there a trick? Hope someone can write back soon. I have about an hour of daylight and then it will start getting cold, and unfortunately my Cayenne is blocking my exit for my 911 so I am stranded home until it's back on the road. All advice welcome! Thanks!
  7. Hey, everyone. I'm looking at buy a 996 Turbo (still, I know...getting closer on this one!) and apparently the hydraulic rear wing is not playing nice. I know that this is a common problem, which is why I thought to ask about it, but I am wondering what my options are other than just leaving it down with the fuse out for the life of the car. I've done some research and it looks like up to $1,300 in parts to replace the entire system enough for it to definitely work again. But what options does everyone recommend for fixed wings? I don't want to spend $7,000 on a body kit or anything, but if there are some elegant, safe, and ultimately not-just-for-looks options at reasonable prices I'm all ears. Thanks!
  8. Simply put, I presently can't afford a CPO Turbo. It's about a $15,000 premium over what I have seen on the non-certified used market. Unfortunately, I now know pretty much exactly what car I want, and won't settle for less. :thankyou:
  9. For those of you replacing the Cassette/Nav system (honestly, what was the rationale behind offering a navigation system with a tape deck?), I am looking at a 996 that has that option and am curious if you've found any fit problems getting an aftermarket head unit in place. It sounds like you just drop in a double-DIN unit and you're set as far as fit goes, but are there any gotchas a guy should be aware of?
  10. An older 911 just has so much appeal to me. It's cute, quirky, and fun. Unless I can snag a 356 roadster to fill that role even more. But for now, one P-car in the garage is more than enough, especially if I land the Turbo.
  11. You're not likely to scare me off, actually. The 996TT looks like it might just be the single best value in a Porsche for year-round use. Reliability that beats the normally-aspirated 996, price point that beats 964 Turbo and 993 Turbo, performance that beats anything but a 997 Turbo, all-wheel-drive and creature comforts that beat all prior cars, maintenance costs that beat all prior Turbos, etc. I think it may just be the car for me. I am chasing a beautiful one now and have a PPI set up for next week, done by a dealership so I assume they know to look for radiator leaks, broken front splitter, over-rev history, damage near jacking points, and other common issues. If I don't get this one, based on the last guitar I bought (which took a little over 2 years and purchases of another great guitar, two amplifiers, and at least $5,000 in other gear between the time I missed a deal on the model I didn't realize I was after and the time I got the deal I wanted), I will probably be chasing Turbos for the next five years or more. And that's okay - no sense buying a second-rate version of my dream car. Meanwhile, I am going to help a friend put a stereo in his 944 this evening and will grab his latest Excellence Magazine to read the article wvicary mentioned above. I already reviewed the links pierre posted this morning. Good information all around, and very appreciated. Thank you. I'm excited to join your elite club. Then I just need to get an older 911 as a summer/Sunday driver, right?
  12. What kind of all-weather tires do you run? I priced out (from tirerack.com) a set of Sport Edition Cup 4 wheels with Pirelli snow tires and threw in a tire storage rack and the total came to $1,457 even. That's 17x7.5 and 17x9 wheels with 205/50R17 and 255/40R17 tires. But all-weather tires that work well in the weather you describe would probably be better for me, as 5 days a week in the winter we have relatively clear streets in town, just some packed snow and icy patches depending on whether it's deep winter or spring, and dry pavement on the highways.
  13. In my foolhardy search for the "perfect" 911 for me, I have come across the knowledge that the Turbo engine lacks some of the common problems of the M96 engine. It also compares favorably in terms of cost to insure and probably in terms of maintenance, as far as I can tell. Are there some different issues I should look at with the Turbo than I have been in shopping for normally aspirated 996's? I mean, other than fulfillment of a boyhood dream of owning a Porsche 911 Turbo. Thanks in advance!
  14. I've looked into it a little bit. The seats aren't that expensive. Here's a pair for $500 on eBay: http://tinyurl.com/2c8rekj The problems are finding them in the right color, getting seats that match the electrical system in your car (memory computer, etc.), and figuring out how to get the heaters working - what I haven't learned yet is whether they require a switch or control system in the car or if that's all on the seat and/or something you can add. But I've basically conceded to myself that I will either buy a car with heated seats at the time of purchase or I will live without them.
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