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RayGT3

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About RayGT3

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  • From
    Buffalo NY
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    04 GT3

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  1. Was in the dealership today, they had 3, C4S's on the floor. Noticed on two of the cars the front and rear lug bolts were different. The fronts were the standard zinc plated type with the dimple in the center and rears were nicely made, machine finished bolts, flat face. The third car had matching set, all zinc bolts. Any idea as to why the difference? Sales guy had no idea, didn'd even notice difference till I mentioned it. Ray
  2. Would like to change the OE '04 GT3 shift cable to the one used in the Cup car. Need P/N's and input as to what a "kit", which would include all items needed to do this, might be. This has been done by others but the parts list and numbers are apparently restricted from the public in general. :rolleyes: TIA
  3. There are specific racing rules as to the operation of this switch. Some things need to deenergised and some need to left in working order. Like the safety systems, fire extinguisher systems etc. If you use the cup car switch and wire it as OEM, you will be OK.
  4. Never tried this but would imagine you couldn't go wrong by taking one out and replacing them one at a time. Remove one - replace - torque, move on to the next one.
  5. I would assume, it would be possible, but unlikely, to get air into the brake system, if in fact, they had at some point drained the reservoir dry. And then somehow messed with the brakes, like pressing the brake pedal with no fluid. I don't think the two systems share anything but the reservoir. But as you mention you are experiencing a change in brake performance after the work had been performed. I would certainly bring this to the dealers attention and at least give them an opportunity to comment or remedy this problem. It's no big deal for them to just bleed the system, if there might be any doubt. Then both parties feel safer.
  6. Current thinking on this is loss of some torque and a bit of a HP gain on the top end, and oh ya lots O'noise.
  7. In my opinion you can use whatever gas you'd like as long as it is dry. It's the play of water that is responsible for the majority of tire inflation maladies. There's some that don't like the Oxygen in air commenting on how it degrades the elastomer (actually Ozone), that is a somewhat a true statement. The only thing one must consider is time. If you have a show queen and never expect to change the tires over the next twenty or more years, use Nitrogen. But the tire outside will just dryrot before the insides. The effect of Oxygen over the average 3 year lifespan of todays tires is of no consideration. It is very difficult to get all the moisture or air, for that matter, out of a tire being filled. At best you can expect to get most but normally you just get rid of some of the moisture by several iterations of filling and refilling. So what is the gain? Getting rid of any moisture is a good thing. This whole thing caught on by racing teams dragging Nitrogen bottles to a racetrack to fill tires. And the reason they used these bottles was it is easier to bring the bottles than a chiller and compressor for clean dry air to use in their "air" tools and tires. Nitrogen was and is cheap, dry and convenient. Using air tools with wet air you could encounter the tool actually freezing from the compressed gas expanding (cooling) and the entrained water in the gas. As to the Argon question, not sure what advantage this might have over dry air. As you mention, if you're going to spend the money, why not Argon? As I refered to above, use whatever gas you want so long as it is dry. As to the expansion differences between the gasses, there is no relative difference, gas laws apply here. There is some small difference in thermoconductivity but can't really relate this to tire performance. I have tried to explain this overly promoted and seemingly personal issue that always seems to poke its ugly head up from time to time. If you might have any comments or questions, they would be certainly be welcome.
  8. Loren, Just sent Gert an email today. Waiting for his reply Tnx.
  9. I spoke to the guys a P Motorsports and they gave me two P/N's for the Cup gurney strip to be used on my RS wing. The P/N's being 996.512.980.9A and 9C. The 9C number described as use in "Asia market". Both are 5mm in height. Any ideas as to the difference between the two? Tnx
  10. RayGT3

    Overheating GT3

    Also need to clean the radiators in the front. They collect all sorts of debris, plastic bags, road kill, erant car parts. You'll be suprised what will turn up jammed in there.
  11. First Argon is not inexpensive, not sure of actual cost but it is on orders of magnitude more expensive than Nitrogen, no contest. Coefficient of expansion of all gasses is close enough to be considered equal. Thermal conductivity is margionally better (lower) but could you tell the difference in a dry suit. I'd be suprised. Second, I'm continually amazed at the fact that people continue to throw their money away on this marketing crap. I'm a retired engineer having worked for a major industrial gas company and currently working at a state university as a research scientist. I continue to tell people of their folly but they seem insensed to throw their money away. Well feel free, but don't say I didn't tell you so.
  12. This whole Nitrogen thing is smoke and mirrors, save your money or invest in better tires for the money saved. It's about the moisture, absolutly nothing to do with the gas. Clean dry, -60 dew point, air is just as good as Nitrogen. The stuff they use on the bead of the tire for mounting contains water, so even if they use Nitrogen, it is wet and no better than plain air. I'm really tired of hearing about people buying into this urban myth and getting taken by this scam.
  13. I guess what you're saying is in order to get the wheel to sit straight when the car is going straight it would need to be positioned some where in between available spline positions. This is a result of the two wheels being assembled by the factory slightly differently. It doesn't take much of a difference considering the small center diameter and the much larger actual wheel diameter, a small relative change on the spline will result in a big change on the outer portion of the wheel. I experienced this as I changed to the alcantara wheel and also noticed a difference of a couple of degrees off center. I just lived with it till my next alignment, informed the folks doing the work of the issue and all was set straight again at that time. You didn't do anything wrong, just the way it is.
  14. A stay in some hot water will help to soften the plastic and help with the fitment. The OE ones seem to be rubber and much more compliant, I just reused the origonal and put the plastic one in a box as a spare.
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