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Thread size for the wheel bolts and removal tool?


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A change on the 987 from my 986 in an attempt to save space/weight by eliminating the jack, spare tire and other tools required to remove the wheels has left me with a little problem, no jack that fits the cups under these cars! :angry:

So I need to find out what the thread size is so I can fashion some removal tools (you know the one, designed to support the wheel while the remaining bolts are removed). I have a plan for the floor jack that I have, along the lines of something I saw on eBay, a pin and some UHMW poly in place of the standard cup on the jack.

So if some one can check the one that came with a 986 as to thread size, length of thread and overall length, this would be very helpful.

I still feel a bit vulnerable traveling with out a jack or a spare! :huh:

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If you mean the wheel hanger tool, I have never used it. Guess because 2 prior cars had wheel bolts and I got use to lining up the wheel. Never seen a mechanic use it, except if the car had ceramic brakes.

You can also get this tool from the aftermarket. Some guys buy a long metric bolt and cut off the head.

post-4-1161967718_thumb.jpg

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Mine is 160mm long, 14mm diameter aluminum alloy round bar stock.

Radius on the handle end, with a 7mm hole for a tommy bar.

The thread is M14x1.5. Thread itself is 13.5 mm long.

There's a threading runout groove at the end of the thread, against a square shoulder.

IMHO, the aftermarket ones made of steel should not be used. The aluminum will give much easier if you bang into it (like with your shin),

and also be less likely to damage the holes in the hub.

Bill

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Thanks for the replies everybody, I am off to the 'Metal Supermarket' this afternoon to get some material to make up what I need, probably over kill but like I say to my kids: 'take care now and later you won't have to say your sorry!'

For me, Murphy is always watching and waiting for me to let down my gaurd so he can jump in with a 'gotcha!', and then he sits back and laughs as I lament " stupid, stupid, stupid..." :censored:

Hey, sort of on the same topic, I thought tire sealants were not the best idea?

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The reason I like the idea of the alignment tool is because I remember having to touch up to many chips I was putting into the paint on the calipers... :angry:

The wheel removal guide is part number: 999-571-074-30
I called the local dealer and was prepared to buy one from them and was pleasently surprised to find that they are charging about 20% more then the MSRP listed on the forums look-up. <_<

Time to head over to Dad's and spin up the lathe!

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The reason I like the idea of the alignment tool is because I remember having to touch up to many chips I was putting into the paint on the calipers... :angry:

The wheel removal guide is part number: 999-571-074-30
I called the local dealer and was prepared to buy one from them and was pleasently surprised to find that they are charging about 20% more then the MSRP listed on the forums look-up. <_<

Time to head over to Dad's and spin up the lathe!

I sure wish I had a metric leadscrew or transposing gears for my aged South Bend.

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The reason I like the idea of the alignment tool is because I remember having to touch up to many chips I was putting into the paint on the calipers... :angry:

The wheel removal guide is part number: 999-571-074-30
I called the local dealer and was prepared to buy one from them and was pleasently surprised to find that they are charging about 20% more then the MSRP listed on the forums look-up. <_<

Time to head over to Dad's and spin up the lathe!

I sure wish I had a metric leadscrew or transposing gears for my aged South Bend.

Hey, way too interesting, My Dad's lathe is a 9" South Bend as well, I am pretty sure that the lead screw in SAE, but he does have a whole lot of gears for it (transposing?). I used this exact type of lathe in shop when I was in grade school, nobody else liked it because of the belt/pully system! Didn't matter to me because that was what I was used too, because of this I had almost unlimited time on it during class too. :)

If I remember correctly it is circa 1940...

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The reason I like the idea of the alignment tool is because I remember having to touch up to many chips I was putting into the paint on the calipers... :angry:

The wheel removal guide is part number: 999-571-074-30
I called the local dealer and was prepared to buy one from them and was pleasently surprised to find that they are charging about 20% more then the MSRP listed on the forums look-up. <_<

Time to head over to Dad's and spin up the lathe!

I sure wish I had a metric leadscrew or transposing gears for my aged South Bend.

Hey, way too interesting, My Dad's lathe is a 9" South Bend as well, I am pretty sure that the lead screw in SAE, but he does have a whole lot of gears for it (transposing?). I used this exact type of lathe in shop when I was in grade school, nobody else liked it because of the belt/pully system! Didn't matter to me because that was what I was used too, because of this I had almost unlimited time on it during class too. :)

If I remember correctly it is circa 1940...

Mine is a 10K, which is basically a 9" on jack stands. circa 1959.

To cut metric pitches you need a special set of metric transposing gears in addition to the "whole lot of gears". Those are called change gears. Sometimes there's a quick change gearbox, like on mine, which is a 40-speed transmission replacing that pile of fiddly gears. None of those pitches are a close enough match to the metric 1.5 thread to allow you to cut a thread and have it screw in fully.

Anyway, the transposing gears are a set of a 127 tooth and a 100 tooth gear. 127 = 254 / 2. 254 comes from the 25.4mm per inch. Those gears are not common, and are not cheap. Complicated by the fact the South Bend uses an oddball pressure angle gear (which vary with the vintage).

Bill

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The reason I like the idea of the alignment tool is because I remember having to touch up to many chips I was putting into the paint on the calipers... :angry:

The wheel removal guide is part number: 999-571-074-30
I called the local dealer and was prepared to buy one from them and was pleasently surprised to find that they are charging about 20% more then the MSRP listed on the forums look-up. <_<

Time to head over to Dad's and spin up the lathe!

I sure wish I had a metric leadscrew or transposing gears for my aged South Bend.

Hey, way too interesting, My Dad's lathe is a 9" South Bend as well, I am pretty sure that the lead screw in SAE, but he does have a whole lot of gears for it (transposing?). I used this exact type of lathe in shop when I was in grade school, nobody else liked it because of the belt/pully system! Didn't matter to me because that was what I was used too, because of this I had almost unlimited time on it during class too. :)

If I remember correctly it is circa 1940...

Mine is a 10K, which is basically a 9" on jack stands. circa 1959.

To cut metric pitches you need a special set of metric transposing gears in addition to the "whole lot of gears". Those are called change gears. Sometimes there's a quick change gearbox, like on mine, which is a 40-speed transmission replacing that pile of fiddly gears. None of those pitches are a close enough match to the metric 1.5 thread to allow you to cut a thread and have it screw in fully.

Anyway, the transposing gears are a set of a 127 tooth and a 100 tooth gear. 127 = 254 / 2. 254 comes from the 25.4mm per inch. Those gears are not common, and are not cheap. Complicated by the fact the South Bend uses an oddball pressure angle gear (which vary with the vintage).

Bill

Hi Bill, your reply leads me to believe that I may be out of luck. Transposing gears, not too likely at all as he is not too found of metric, avoids working in it whenever possible. But being that he is a machinist by trade and knowing that he made a couple of the change gears that were missing when he bought the lathe, maybe he can make these too?

Dad's lathe does not have the quick change gear box, we have been looking for one of these forever, we have learned to live with the gears, he is 'old school', I sometimes think that he was looking for the gear box so I would make more use of the lathe!

I searched the net and found out that 14mm-1.5 dies are available in HSS, not too expensive $12.90 from a place called Victor Machinery, this might be the easier route if you only needed to make one size metric thread. But...

I would also like to duplicate the thread pitch found on the tow hook, it is even larger.

Al

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Al,

One of the things I learned over the years after becoming interested in machining and acquiring the lathe and Birdgeport. Never make it if you can just buy it. Unless of course, it's just too much fun. :-)

http://www.wrljet.com/junk/

Bill

You are right on that, I checked with a local fastener company, and they can get 14mm-1.5 bolts 150mm long for $7.00 (2 day delivery), might be the way to go and save the machine time for the 'other project' involving the tow hook mount... Still requires metric threads because I doubt that the tow hook would use something different.

BTW, you've got me on what the zbar-pivot is?

Al

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Al,

You're lucky to find sources of metric hardware like that. Around me I couldn't find anybody willing to sell capscrews like that for less than a $50 mininum.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, personally I wouldn't go with steel for this application because of the potential for injury, both personal and to the threads in the wheel hub. But that's just me.

The z-bar pivot is an example of a buy vs. build hobby decision. I installed a modern 5.0L motor in an '65 Mustang. The newer motors use a cable clutch linkage vs. the much more complicated mechanical linkage used in the old cars. A piece of that linkage looks a bit like a "Z". As a result of the change, a required boss on the block has been removed from the new motors. That thing in the pics is a bolt-on replacement I made for the missing attachment point on the block.

Bill

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Bill,

As I mentioned in an earlier post, personally I wouldn't go with steel for this application because of the potential for injury, both personal and to the threads in the wheel hub. But that's just me.

I agree, that's why I started the DIY quest, actually picked up the aluminum yesterday. The bolt inquirery was the backup plan.

About the Mustang, sound like you are a bit of a hot-rodder as well!

Al

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