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The replacement of the 986 rear control arm has been covered in previous treads. This post describes the possible REPAIR of the rear control arm. You might as well try it since you can allways by a new part if this fix does not work. First remove the control arm. Clean the control arm and remove the rubber gators covering the main bushing ( 2 ). Then support the bottom of the bushing housing with a large socket to where the only contact is on the bottom crimp. Then use a 1/8" flat punch and lightly dent the roll crimp around the entire circumfence to tighten the original crimp to take out the axial plat that causes the noise. Note that only ONE side needs this treatment. Lubricate the ball joint and reattach the protective rubber gators. Reinstall the control arm and test drive your quiet Boxster. I did this repair on my 2003 Boxster S last year, 3000 miles ago and it is still performing as new. Saved $ 600.00 in parts. :clapping: , Acomplish this repair at your own risk!post-21285-1212784861_thumb.jpg[

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Hi Boxsterfahrer,

I was wondering if you notice the condition of the rubber bushing in the control arm. Was it damage, cracked, or worn? It sounds like your problem was a floating bushing and was corrected by seating it more firmly in the control arm.

I haven't looked at the control arm myself but the dealer said it was broken and needed replacing. I'm going to check to see how broken it is.

Thanks for sharing your experience.

Jones

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Hi Boxsterfahrer,

I was wondering if you notice the condition of the rubber bushing in the control arm. Was it damage, cracked, or worn? It sounds like your problem was a floating bushing and was corrected by seating it more firmly in the control arm.

I haven't looked at the control arm myself but the dealer said it was broken and needed replacing. I'm going to check to see how broken it is.

Thanks for sharing your experience.

Jones

The rubber seal was in perfect condition and I believe that the problem is a less then perfect crimp leading to some slight radial play.

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Boxsterfahrer,

How difficult is it to remove the control arm to do what you're suggesting? Is it necessary to get the rear end aligned afterwords?

Joe

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Boxsterfahrer,

How difficult is it to remove the control arm to do what you're suggesting? Is it necessary to get the rear end aligned afterwords?

Joe

Remove the rear wheel. Then remove the Trailing Arm ( item 8 in the parts fiche ) by removing one M 14x 1.5 Nut and M14x1.5X75 mm bolt close to the wheel carrier and the second bolt M14x1.5x90 mm fastening the control arm to the car body. The nut in the upper part is fixed and the bolt can be removed by using a socket from the bottom. Then simply remove the Trailing Arm and repair per my instruction. Install by installing the bolt at the car body first and then use a 2nd jack to raise the wheel carrier to make the insertion of the 2nd bolt by the wheel carrier easier. Both bolts should be torqued to 118 ft-lb. Good luck and let us know how it works for you. Your wheel alignment should be ok.

Edited by Boxsterfahrer

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How in the h*** does one get a torque wrench in to torque the bolt at the car body? There's barely enough room for a ratchet wrench?

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How in the h*** does one get a torque wrench in to torque the bolt at the car body? There's barely enough room for a ratchet wrench?

You need to use a socket wrench and an extension and insert the socket from the bottom up. You may need to use a open or 12 point wrench to hold the nut on the upper side, although on my car that was not needed since the nut was captive and did not turn.

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So, that must mean that you have to remove the plastic shield to allow for more room.

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Another question, the rubber gators. What's the trick/secret in getting the bottom O ring back on the gator. The top one is no problem.

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Another question, the rubber gators. What's the trick/secret in getting the bottom O ring back on the gator. The top one is no problem.

Answer1: Yes, remove the plastic rock shield for easy access.

Answer2: Steel keeper for top and bottom rubber gaitor. Try to separate the steel keeper and hold one end in the groove and then unwind the remaining spring while getting it in the groove. The ring is basically built like a Slinky that is tightly compressed. A second person might be able to assost you or just use a saftey wire wound around the gator groove to hold it in place.

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Well, Boxsterfahrer, your diy seems to have worked. I don't hear the chattering. At least I don't think I do. Kind of like when one has a pebble in their shoe and it's removed. There's the feeling that it's still there. I'm waiting for the **** noise to reappear. Meanwhile, so far so good. Thanks for the diy and the help.

Edited by cayvman

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HI I know this post is old but I thought I would give it a shot! Your instructions and details are spot on and although my repair has improved things the rumbling noise is still there. Its odd how such a small joint can cause that amount of noise over cracks and gravel like surfaces,yet over large holes its silent. Anyway if anything its made me 80% certain that I need to replace the whole arm, its frustrating as the arm itself is fine its just the poor design of the joint.

Anyway thanks for your post and advice.

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