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RicksCarrera

New IMS RMS AOS Flywheel and clutch

3 posts in this topic

Hi All

I am in the very final phase of a major project for my 2000 996 C2 cab with about 100k miles. I replaced the IMS, RMS, AOS, flywheel and clutch. A nice winter project!

As with most things porsche, one needs patience, because there is always a fair amount of reaching and feeling and the need for just the right combination of tool and angle to get the job done. Following the workshop manual and many different posters here at renntech and rennlist and from youtube, I put the car on jackstands 24" above the floor. A lift would be better. I pulled the transmission, clutch and flywheel. The top transmission bolt requires a u joint and two foot extension and you need to reach around both sides of the tranny in order to place the socket on the bolt. I had bought the very expensive LN engineering dual race IMS(for my car) for about $800 and the pro tool kit for about $350. The Tool kit made the setup of TDC and locking the cam and pulling the bearing and installing new bearing relatively easy. I used a basic CPVC type 4"plumbing cap and carefully drove new RMS to 13mm from crankcase flange. The AOS was a bear to remove in one piece due to original permanent hose clamps. I was able to remove old AOS and install the new one from under the car using new fuel line hose clamps for the two small coolant hoses and a ~11/4" screw hose clamp for the bottom bellows hose. I used the old AOS to practice just the right way to install the AOS into position. Re installing the tranny takes patience. You need to be methodical about lining it up with an equal gap between tranny and engine all the way around, and that the bolt holes are lining up. It took me a while but it came together. I did a flush/bleed of the clutch and brakes, the conventional two person way, and it worked like a charm, no power bleeder. Just do not let master reservoir fall below max because the clutch pickup is high up in the reservoir. 

It is a big job, but doable. It was nice to be able go to work and leave it from time to time. I also had the tires dismounted and I am having the rims powder coated satin black for a new look. 

Cheers Rick

Edited by RicksCarrera

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Congrats on completing the job.  I did the same.  AOS was the hardest part IMO.  I used "guide pins" in the block (made from bolts with the heads cut off) to help with the gearbox install.  It ensures you are lined up square, which is kind of hard to be sure of when working alone under the car.  The fine splines on the input shaft don't help either, as far as getting the thing engaged properly in the clutch disc.

 

I have 1500 miles on my work now with no issues or leaks so I am starting to relax!  Best of luck with yours.

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For guide pins - you can also use high grade metric all thread but be aware the threaded holes in the crankcase halves are not all the same diameter. I left the threaded rod in place (with green or maybe blue  loctite) and then fitted deep , high grade nuts (+ green Loctite)

The other oddity is that the OEM bolts are significantly shorter than the threaded depth of the holes allows. So my custom studs are significantly longer than the bolts were. But do not let them bottom out in the crankcase. Good idea to chase and clean the threads before you put the threaded rod in.

The other little aid was to very lightly 'dress' the leading edge/corners of the input shaft to help it slip in.

And if you didn't get the centering of the friction plate absolutely perfect , none of this will help !

 

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