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Vette Moto

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About Vette Moto

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    Cayenne Turbo

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  1. Hi, old post but did you to route any wire from the back of the car up to the radio in the dash? Also, I take it that the XM retrofit was a relatively plug and play experience for you and everything is working?
  2. ere is my 955 Cayenne Turbo Coolant Tees (or Ts) DIY Tutorial to help those tackle this in the future. First, you need to remove the intake manifold. There are several DIYs on this. It also helps to remove the secondary air injector pump on the driver side. You will see why below. You can remove the entire Tee assembly in one piece--only 4 points need to be unclamped. I labeled these points A,B,C, and D. All 4 points required me to razor the rubber hoses to remove them. Cable operated hose clamp plier is definitely required to do this job. It is also a good idea to remove the driver's side secondary air pump to give you more space for working on C and D. A and B are relatively easy to remove. C is the most challenging to remove as it involves blindingly feeling your way around to work the clamp off and to razor the hose. See pictures below to see area I used to unclamp and razor C. D required me to work from the side of the driver's fender from the top to undo the clamp, then go underneath the car and reach up through the cat to razor the hose off. Here is basically the orientation of the Tees when installed on the car. This is the razor I used to cut the hose. A and B are very easy to remove. C requires a lot of patience. It is right in this area. Zooming in to area... You can see it here... The full view of C... I went through from above, working on the driver's fender to cut C loose. Remove the secondary air injector on the driver side (DIY not shown) to provide ample space to work. Here is the opening where I worked my arm and hand to C. It was tough--very tight space. This is where the majority of my arm scuffs came from (long sleeves might've helped). This is also the opening I used to unclamp C. I unclamped D from above, working on the driver's fender. Opening looks familiar? It's because it's the same opening as C, except now you're looking straight down to the ground. Picture of D from above. Here is D from below the car. Picture taken from the left side of the driver's cat. Zoom in of D Picture of D taken from right side of driver's cat. This was the area and side I went in to slice D. This is also a blind reach, so make sure you feel for the right hose before slicing. That's all there is to remove the Ts! No engine pull necessary. Installation is reversal of the above steps. I used all new Porsche rubber hoses for the Ts and bought both the aluminum Ts (1 T sized at 3/4" x 3'4" x 3/4" and 1 sized at 1" x 3/4" x 1") for $50 over at jagsthatrun. For your new aluminum Ts, I used Porsche spring clamps to join the rubber hoses to the Ts. Some prefer the more traditional and readily available worm clamps. I just don't like worm clamps as I've had bad luck with them in the past of undoing themselves overtime. Choose at your discretion. I do find it helpful to lube up the aluminum pipes before joining the rubber hoses. Good luck!
  3. 955 Turbo Coolant Ts Tutorial DIY ere is my 955 Cayenne Turbo Coolant Tees (or Ts) DIY Tutorial to help those tackle this in the future. First, you need to remove the intake manifold. There are several DIYs on this. It also helps to remove the secondary air injector pump on the driver side. You will see why below. You can remove the entire Tee assembly in one piece--only 4 points need to be unclamped. I labeled these points A,B,C, and D. All 4 points required me to razor the rubber hoses to remove them. Cable operated hose clamp plier is definitely required to do this job. It is also a good idea to remove the driver's side secondary air pump to give you more space for working on C and D. A and B are relatively easy to remove. C is the most challenging to remove as it involves blindingly feeling your way around to work the clamp off and to razor the hose. See pictures below to see area I used to unclamp and razor C. D required me to work from the side of the driver's fender from the top to undo the clamp, then go underneath the car and reach up through the cat to razor the hose off. Here is basically the orientation of the Tees when installed on the car. This is the razor I used to cut the hose. A and B are very easy to remove. C requires a lot of patience. It is right in this area. Zooming in to area... You can see it here... The full view of C... I went through from above, working on the driver's fender to cut C loose. Remove the secondary air injector on the driver side (DIY not shown) to provide ample space to work. Here is the opening where I worked my arm and hand to C. It was tough--very tight space. This is where the majority of my arm scuffs came from (long sleeves might've helped). This is also the opening I used to unclamp C. I unclamped D from above, working on the driver's fender. Opening looks familiar? It's because it's the same opening as C, except now you're looking straight down to the ground. Picture of D from above. Here is D from below the car. Picture taken from the left side of the driver's cat. Zoom in of D Picture of D taken from right side of driver's cat. This was the area and side I went in to slice D. This is also a blind reach, so make sure you feel for the right hose before slicing. That's all there is to remove the Ts! No engine pull necessary. Installation is reversal of the above steps. I used all new Porsche rubber hoses for the Ts and bought both the aluminum Ts (1 T sized at 3/4" x 3'4" x 3/4" and 1 sized at 1" x 3/4" x 1") for $50 over at jagsthatrun. For your new aluminum Ts, I used Porsche spring clamps to join the rubber hoses to the Ts. Some prefer the more traditional and readily available worm clamps. I just don't like worm clamps as I've had bad luck with them in the past of undoing themselves overtime. Choose at your discretion. I do find it helpful to lube up the aluminum pipes before joining the rubber hoses. Good luck! Author Vette Moto Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 04/18/2016 10:11 AM Updated 02/17/2018 04:55 PM  
  4. Clarksongli, I am pretty impressed that you were able to figure out how to remove the turbo without dropping the engine. Kudos to that. What was going on with your turbo that prompted you to undertake the removal? Now if SpawnyWhippet can get a DIY together.
  5. I don't think the waterpump's impeller actually split off from the shaft, but rather the composite material of the impeller wears down overtime, thus reducing the flow of coolant moving through the system. Typically a tell tale sign of this is coolant temperature pegging past middle of gauge. (could also mean thermostat is stuck closed) The next time you have your belt off, spin the idlers and feel for smoothness. If you have what feels like sand in the bearing, then it's time to replace them. All pulleys should spin with buttery smoothness and be silent as a whisper. The belt tensioner spring/hydraulic itself don't really fail. It is the pulley attached to the tensioner that wears down. If you see the grooves from the ribbed belt engraved onto the pulley, then it's time to change.
  6. Yikes, hope it's just a cracked ducting. I can't imagine how the turbo would crack, and would probably be the 1st time I heard about this on a Cayenne if it was the case. But with today's Cayenne's racking up mileage, I guess anything is possible.
  7. Typically, new expansion tank will come with a new radiator cap. If you plan to keep the car for a little longer, I would consider changing the expansion tank and thermostat. I may looking into a starter rebuild if you are having starting issues. Might not be necessary to do anything with starter if you have no problems with it, and since you are well-versed in removing the intake manifold in 1 hr, then it shouldn't be an issue when it needs maintenance. I would probably change the coolant vent pipes (948 106 026 04) since you are already in the area. When I did both of my tees, any hoses and clamps that I removed, I replaced with new ones. It will get expensive, but it gave me a little more peace of mind that it'll go another 100K. You may not need to do that. I have heard the spring clamp losing tension overtime, thus springing a leak, though not very common. If you're feeling playful, I would probably do the waterpump too, and since you will have the belt removed, I would replace all the idle pulleys, serpentine belt, and maybe your serpentine belt tensioner.
  8. why did your air injection impeller break apart? Was it due to the deteriorating foam filter in the air injector?
  9. gbratk, can you hit the highlights on the procedure you went through to DIY your motor mounts? What did you have to remove? Any tips? Thanks
  10. Curious myself--can you remove the turbocharger without dropping the engine?
  11. Is this a tell-tale sign of anything? When I insert a cd into the dash of my 05 CTT, the PCM acts as if there is no CD in the unit. I can't even eject the CD unless I do a car restart and hit eject before the PCM loads. Anyone had this problem? Maybe it needs lens cleaning? CD changer and everything else on PCM works fine.
  12. Climate control is turned off before shutting the car off, but every time I restart the car after work, it turns back on automatically. I observed this after the car has been off for several hours. The interesting part is that if I turn off the climate control and turn the car off for a brief period of time (less than 10 minute), say for example, for filling gas or running into convenience store, the climate control stays off when restarting the car. Is there a way to permanently keep the climate control off instead of always having to manually turn it off after startup?
  13. Thanks for checking. I have that clip too, but it does not work. I'll just fabricate something to get the cover to hold.
  14. not 13. I am trying to attach 11 to 15. Appears there needs to be a special clip of some sort.
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