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Found 91 results

  1. Hi there, my Cayenne is telling me my driver's side door is open when it is not. This is causing the dome light to stay on. Not sure what the issue is and if can be fixed easily. Any info given is greatly appreciated, thanks!
  2. Hello everyone, Does anyone have or know where I may have the bolt torque specs for a 2008 Cayenne Turbo? I need pretty much the specifications for all the bolts and nuts that would be included in a block replacement. I'm getting the back rebuilt by 928 Motorsports and reinstalling with an experienced friend. However, it's nearly impossible to find the specs for these motors. Additionally, if there's a place where I could find a complete 957 workshop manual, could someone please advise? Thank you.
  3. Cayenne 3.6 V6 Intake Manifold Removal DIY This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals. Author shonuff Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 03/09/2018 08:31 AM Updated 03/09/2018 10:00 AM  
  4. Just wanted to say thanks to the community helped answer some questions about the scoring on my 2008 CTT 957. My next question is, does anyone know where I may purchase a complete engine seals and gasket kit for a 2008 Cayenne Turbo? Or if these are unavailable as a whole unit, had anyone rebuilt their engine from the cylinder scoring or something similar and have a parts list of required seals and gaskets which need changed? Additionally, are there any other suggestions on parts that I should change some I'll have the motor apart? Anything would help at this point. Thanks
  5. The common coolant pipe issue seems to only affect the V8 Cayenne's. I'm wondering if my coolant leak is a common problem too. I've been losing coolant on my 3.6 V6 Cayenne at a fairly slow rate compared to the other more common issue. I'm having to top it off about once every month or two. Last weekend I was changing the oil and started investigating the leak. It looks to be coming from a black plastic coolant hose fitting on the back of the engine, passenger side. Has anyone seen this problem before? I'm wondering if there is just a bad o-ring behind that fitting or if the whole part needs to be replaced. And if anyone knows the part number for this I would greatly appreciate that too! Thanks
  6. I have a 2004 Cayenne S. I just got it recently, interior lights have never worked. I checked the fuse and it was blown. It calls for a 20 amp fuse but the blown one in it was a 25 amp. I had the key in the ignition if I remember correctly and put the new 20 amp fuse in and everything came on. Side note, I noticed a weird glitch with the light above the rear passenger side door and the switch on the main map reading light. The interior lights had gone off and I turned the back on and the backlight above to passenger side door was very dim. I slid the switch on the overhead console for the main map light and the rear light came back to full strength. I found that odd. Everything then worked fine. I took the key out. Next time I put the key in, immediately heard the fuse blow. Any ideas on where to start?
  7. Hi Guys. I am new to the forum and proud new owner of a beautiful 06 Cayenne S. I love my new Porsche, but am slowly working on fixing a few minor issues... First of all, my driver door latch is defective or at least the switch in there is. The vehicle never knows when the driver door is open, no dome lights or door ajar switch or chime. I have already purchased a brand new replacement latch assembly. Any instructions or tutorials on the fastest and easiest way to replace this? Any help is greatly appreciated, thanks!
  8. I have a 2008 Porsche Cayenne S with door alarm issues. The door(s) do not recognize whether they are open or closed. This image on the instrument panel shows a passenger front door ajar icon and the beeping alarm is enough to made a sane man or woman drive off a bridge. On the driver side over the past year I have noticed the door open or key in ignition alarm come on or not, the red door lamp not light, and the interior lights not come on when opening the door. On the passenger side i have experienced the alarm icon and alarm on continuously while driving, the interior lamps staying on after the doors are closed, the signal not sounding when locking the vehicle with the remote, or the security alarm suddenly going off a short time after locking, and probably a few other annoying items. I have applied the quick fix canned air and WD-40 to the passenger door a few times and it got me through the winter, but not any longer. So I was about to tear the passenger door apart and try and repair the latch when I started thinking it might be the driver door, which obviously has experienced a zillion more opening and closing than the passenger door. My question is, is there a separate door ajar alarm icon showing on the dash for each door, or only one showing the passenger door ajar for all door open errors? I l have only seen the Passenger door icon warning. When I leave the key in and open the drier door there is no longer an alarm, and the red door safety light in not lit. When I manually move the door catch one notch up, the alarm sounds and the light comes on. When I move it up another notch to full lock the alarm quits and the light goes out. I apologize in advance the length of this post but it seems to be a common issue. Regards, Yukonriver Roy
  9. Hey yall! I'm new here, long time lurker but now that I've come to a bunch of problems I cannot get resolve with the DIY or tutorial I was able to find on here or youtube I decided to open a post with my issues and see what you guys think! I have some (prolly) simple ones and some really weird ones. A little bit of context: I just bought my cayenne turbo (2004) 2 months ago from its 1st owner that neglected it for the last 3-5 years of ownership. I have done a lot of mechanical work on the car ( I can list everything if needed). These issues are mainly cosmetic and quality of life ones. 1st: The side view mirror shells. Are they suppose to be this flimsy ? the half shell does a plastic rattling noise when I close the door (mainly on the driver side) https://streamable.com/kg8zt 2nd: Steering column adjustment. Now this one I read a lot about resetting the seat control by tilting it and stuff, done it, did not work. It did clear my memory settings for the seats but not reset the motor for the steering wheel. As you can see, it can go in and out, not up and down.... https://streamable.com/aciky 3rd: The PoS that is called the PCM Radio. I think the previous owner finger f*ck the hell out of the radio system because, well... It's not working great. Main issue it that the time keeps resetting and does not fallow the real clock, it just gets stuck and the date is now missing but used to be stuck in year 2000 (for a 2004 model) It's asking me to insert the GPS disk to get it to update I think now... https://streamable.com/qjyax https://streamable.com/pr748 4th: The worst. Hopefully the video explains it....well, it's completely lost at where to throw the air... https://streamable.com/2vxfq I have another major one when I drive that it kick between gears (only some gears, only some times) mechanic told me it's the transfercase/module, interweb tells me it's the transmission valve body..., i'll make a video about that one later. Thank for the help in advance !
  10. having some issues with locking my cs using the key fob , i can unlock the car fine with the fob but i have to be next to drivers glass to lock the car . i have changed the battery in the fob no luck the led on the fob goes off when i press the lock button , i have also tried resync the key . has anybody had this similar fault
  11. This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  12. Hi - on my 06 CTTS, over the last few months I noticed occasionally awful smell inside the cabin while driving. My research so far indicates that it is emitted from vents when AC system is on. Believe it smells like sth. burned, and is not present when I switch AC system completely off. Did anybody experience this before on a 955 Cayenne, Turbo or Turbo S ? Thanks in advance. PS.: side note. It may be coincidence or completely unrelated, but as far as electrical problems I am noticing for about comparable amount of time that the horn is dead (silence when pressing the steering wheel center...).
  13. Greetings and thank you for the informative site. I am a new owner of a 2009 Cayenne base model with dead Horn. I’ve read on the forum of typical failures, including steering wheel wire and two horn units. So far I’ve confirmed the fuse is ok. Before removing wheel arch covers to test the horns, I wanted to check the relay. Is the horn relay in the under hood fuse box? If so, which position? thank you, Ben
  14. Any idea if I need a new motor or to take the mirror apart and clean something?
  15. Hello, Does anyone know how to find the radio security code other than removing the actual multimedia console? I found this website here but not sure if it really works. My concern is when I change the battery (which is dying) how to gain access to the multimedia center again should it require a security code. I am the third owner and have found nothing written in any of the vehicle documents. Any advice would be appreciated.
  16. Hi All, So today, after putting gas (Shell, premium) in my 2014 Cayenne base, I got on the freeway and shortly after, the check engine light came on and Cayenne started shaking abnormally. I was able to turn around and get back home but I noticed 1. When I stop, the CEL flashes and the Cayenne shakes a lot more 2. When I press on the gas, it takes a long time to pick up speed (really struggling). I connected the Durametric when I got home and I see the following misfire fault codes on it. Anyone have any suggestions? Cayenne has around 62k miles on it. P030000 Random/Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected Factory Fault Code 10203 Warning Indicator Off Test Not Completed This Monitoring Cycle Test Failed Since Last Clear Test Completed Since Last Clear Pending DTC Test Not Failed This Operation Cycle Fault Active P030100 Cyl.1 Misfire Detected Factory Fault Code 10591 Warning Indicator Off Test Not Completed This Monitoring Cycle Test Failed Since Last Clear Test Completed Since Last Clear Pending DTC Test Not Failed This Operation Cycle Fault Active P030300 Cyl.3 Misfire Detected Factory Fault Code 10593 Warning Indicator Off Test Not Completed This Monitoring Cycle Test Failed Since Last Clear Test Completed Since Last Clear Pending DTC Test Not Failed This Operation Cycle Fault Active P030600 Cyl.6 Misfire Detected Factory Fault Code 10596 Warning Indicator Off Test Not Completed This Monitoring Cycle Test Failed Since Last Clear Test Completed Since Last Clear Pending DTC Test Not Failed This Operation Cycle Fault Active P030200 Cyl.2 Misfire Detected Factory Fault Code 10592 Warning Indicator Off Test Not Completed This Monitoring Cycle Test Failed Since Last Clear Test Completed Since Last Clear Pending DTC Test Not Failed This Operation Cyclea Fault Active P130A00 Hide cylinder Factory Fault Code 10205 Warning Indicator Off Test Completed This Monitoring Cycle Test Failed Since Last Clear Test Completed Since Last Clear Pending DTC Test Not Failed This Operation Cycle Fault Passive
  17. Hi cayenne 04 CTT weirdness the below list of functions was intermittent now nothing works buttons on steering wheel tiptromic button on steering wheel wipers cruise control pin out adjustment all functionality on the steering wheel except it steers perfectly all fuses are good errors as attached any ideas was intermittent
  18. Hello, Any help on this would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. This is my first post and I will try to be as specific as I can. SORRY if it seems long. I have a base model cayenne 2004 with 89,000 miles. I have always been good about the upkeep... Just changed oil, oil and air filter 2 days ago. For a few months now I have been getting the 4WD system faulty and the PSM failure workshop codes. The codes usually do not come up right away upon starting the car. They pretty much always come up in the middle of a drive at various speeds. I could be on the highway or at city speeds. The codes ALWAYS come up together, which makes me think they could be related? 4WD first and then PSM immediately after. (The 4WD definitely works however. I just moved from Minnesota and drove through the mountains in Denver with the car. I had no issues with the car losing traction. It honestly plowed through the ice and snow like a boss!) The small icon on the dash will also stay lit (a triangle with exclamation point in middle with circle arrow around it.) Next time I go to start the car it is gone. I have not noticed any problems with the car while driving. To me it seems perfectly fine and drives the same the first day I bought it. I looked at the previous forums on this problem but I never saw an actual solution? The guy just gave up and sold it. Other users mentioned it could be the battery. I just had my battery checked and was told it is still good. My FM transmitter also checks the voltage every time I plug it in (basically every time I drive) and always says the voltage is normal. I took it to a mechanic and he said it would have to be diagnosed by the Porsche dealership. He told me this because he said he does not want to waste my time and suspect the wrong part to replace if that is not really the issue. He said it is really hard to diagnose these cars without the bench only the dealership has. He did give me the exact codes which I can list later once I grab the paper from the glovebox. So basically, he got the codes for me and gave me some more transmission fluid which he said was a little low. He cleared the codes for me and charged me $75 dollars. Seems stupid considering I still have the issue and now have to go to the dealership next Friday to get proper diagnosis. But, at least he did not charge me original diagnosis for $145... Anyways, the codes are still coming up after the guy cleared them. Let me know if you have any input on the situation or if you could link a similar forum where the user listed the solution that would be fine as well. SIDE NOTE: I am also receiving the message system key faulty. My mechanic in Minnesota said that was simply due to the weight of the key in the ignition moving around. He said it was no big deal and does not affect the car mechanically. The previous owner bought 2 new key fobs about 1 year ago. This happens with both keys. I have one with a lanyard and keychain on it that I use regularly and the other is just the fob itself. Can anyone confirm that this is true? I know it seems small but it is kind of annoying to hear it pop up often. I'm sure the dealership will give me the info I need and I can update this post after the diagnosis Friday. If any of you smart Porsche pals can point me in the right direction before the appointment I can at least prepare myself for what I'm getting into lol.
  19. Hey everyone, I am new on this forum. Was recommended to create a topic about my problem here. Its a Cayenne S V8 2011 petrol Recently noticed oil leaking from the front area (left side of the car). See the Picture:) Porsche workshop is not fully sure yet about exactly where its leaking from. They think its from the oil pan and to find the exact place or fix it, they will have to take motor out and as well gearbox as I understood. They have recommended me to drive it 1000km and come back again for the check-up. They say its coming somewhere from the oil pan, but coulld as well be from somewhere above the oilpan. Thought post it here, and check if someone have had this kind of problem on their 958 or know about it. It leaks only when the car is running. Thanks for all the help I can get:)
  20. Hi I just bought a cayenne 3.2 V6 2006 base model, on my way home car was running fine, second day morning went to put some gas and after getting home car idle was rough Stop the engine and start back on now the car start goes to 1000 rpm for 5 seconds and then start shaking going to 500 rpm or less for about 30 seconds then car it self try to correct and goes to 1100 rpm for the same 5 seconds and then back to the bad idle. If i press de gas pedal right after the start car goes fine without any issue to 4000 rpm for the same 5 seconds and then complete loose the power, back to the 500 Or less rpm. When the car try's to correct back to the 1000rpm I can gas up to the 4000 rpm fine, is like a loop. I have a Autel Scaner shows 1 code in the getaway code 532 power supply what i have done: new battery new coils and spark plugs check fuel pump all good check the spark in the coils fix 2 vacuum pipes I have no idea of what else I live in Panama and I'm 600 miles away from the only Porsche dealer. I'm a mecanic but out of ideas now any help will be much appreciated thanks
  21. Hello everyone, This is my first post but I have done tons of forum searching and found similar posts but nothing with my same codes. I have noticed a rough idle but once I drive the car drives great and boosts great. Along with the 2 EVAP codes I have P0300, P0301, P0304 and P0308. I have changed the spark plugs and I did a full inspection of the coil packs. The coil packs looked perfect, no cracks or damage and it needed new plugs so I did Beru plugs. In that process I changed the torque arm also because the rubber was shot. That didn't solve the misfire and I didnt notice any wiring issues or connector issues. Onto the EVAP stuff. I have the two codes P2401 & P0448. Just put a new gas cap on and cleared the codes, they come right back. I also checked the oil fill cap and its seal looks great (no cracks in the oring). Does anyone have any idea or run into these same symptoms? I have an appointment at my local Indy shop in a few days but would like to go in prepared. They're going to start with a smoke test looking for a vacuum leak. Thanks in advance, Evan
  22. I am a member of the PCA and have changed brake pads numerous times on 5 different 911's totaling more than I can count on both hands. Does anyone know what the part numbers are for doing a break change (pads, rotors, sensors) on a 2008 Cayenne S VIN: WP1AB29P58LA50752 Thanks Rob
  23. My 2013 Cayenne get a heavy power steering at low speed. It looks like there is no power steering assistant under 5mph. I stopped by the dealer twice. Told me that there is no problem. I did research on this forum and found that " servotronic control relay has been known to fail causing heavy steering. " . Dealer told me that my can doesn't has servotronic control relay at all. any idea? Thanks
  24. Hi, I'd like to ask a question that has been asked, discussed, youtube videoed etc... My apologies, but I've read most of them and haven't found anything similar. I'm looking at a 2004-2006 Cayenne Turbo that I don't want to turn into an engine money pit. I've listened to 8, all cold and most have a very slight knock on the drivers side of the engine. I'm wondering if this is the beginning to the end or some explainable sound. You can only hear it once it drops to a low idle. I went to my local dealer in Denver and they stated they have no way to diagnose, would not perform a new car inspection, but would do a compression check. I realize this is tough to know when the dreaded engine knock may come due to extreme cold, piston expansion, etc...etc... I'm also aware that the turbos were less prone. If I'm going to drop a new engine into an old cayenne, I'd rather do it on a $10k one than $18k which is the present range for a 2004-2005 in CO. Thanks for anyone's help and as a newbie, I hope to purchase a Cayenne and give back via DIY but don't really want to deal with engine issues for 200k+. Thanks again, Frank
  25. Hi, it seems the sticker with vehicle information on my Cayenne is damaged. Was looking for interior color code, to buy perfect match touch up paint. In car sticker is damaged, on vehicle hand book information pack, there is no interior color code. Any one can help please?
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