Jump to content

The RennTech.org community is Member supported!  Please consider an ANNUAL donation to help keep this site operating.
Click here to Donate

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Clutch wear and feel


Recommended Posts

Gents,

I've recently acquired a 2005 Boxster with 3800 mi pre-owned from a well respected dealer.

Knowing this car has a hydraulic clutch that self-adjusts for wear, what are the signs of clutch wear or failure. I should not be anywhere near the point where I should have to worry about clutch wear but my concern is that the clutch grabs very late when I destroke the pedal and would like to know if that is normal. The clutch does not slip and it has a good feel, but I was used to some cars that start grabbing after very little pedal movement; the boxster seems to require significant pedal movement. It will feather starting at ½ stroke, but does not really grab until I practically take my foot off. If I depress the pedal just a bit, the clutch also immediately disengages. I'm a conservative driver, don't race etc.

Additioanlly, knowing that there is no good answer, just wondering out of curiosity what people have been getting life-wise from these clutches. The 986 has been known to have "poor" life. Is the 987 the same way? Is the disc organic or ceramic? Expense to replace?

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen that one already but it refers to the 986. Anyone have this type of experience with the 987?

Now I am becoming more concerned with the late clutch engagement.

Thanks

Take it back to the dealership where you made the purchase. I think there is an adjustment that can be done to the catch-point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clutch biting point seems to vary on the 987S. My clutch was replaced at 30 k miles but it was not worn and the biting point was on the last half of the clutch pedal travel. The new clutch had the same biting point , so i wouldn't worry about the exact point on the travel. From what I've read , it may have more to do with the clutch slave cylinder , I would suggest getting the slave cylinder fixings checked and the clutch system bled as ther have been issues with clutch slip due to air locks and poorly fastened slave cylinders on the cayman forum. The fact my clutch would slip on a fast start , but the lining and cover plate looked ok when removed suggests that the slave cylinder may be a more likely fault for clutch biting points etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clutch biting point seems to vary on the 987S. My clutch was replaced at 30 k miles but it was not worn and the biting point was on the last half of the clutch pedal travel. The new clutch had the same biting point , so i wouldn't worry about the exact point on the travel. From what I've read , it may have more to do with the clutch slave cylinder , I would suggest getting the slave cylinder fixings checked and the clutch system bled as ther have been issues with clutch slip due to air locks and poorly fastened slave cylinders on the cayman forum. The fact my clutch would slip on a fast start , but the lining and cover plate looked ok when removed suggests that the slave cylinder may be a more likely fault for clutch biting points etc.

Berty987, was it covered under warranty?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

The pressure plate is a special construction with a automatic adjusting system witch compensate the thickness off the clutch plate during his live, to maintain the biting point at the same possition, worn or new. It is not possible to reset the pressure plate what means that the pressure plate and the clutch plate have to be changed as a unit ( 997 - 987 )

Perhaps that you find out the problem in this area, the biting point is approx. 1/4 travel. Slave or other cylinders have nothing to do with clutch slip.

Regards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slave or other cylinders have nothing to do with clutch slip.

Regards.

However , if the slave cylinder is not aligned correctly then the slave cylinder can stick and does not release fully or quickly enough. The result is the flywheel spins on the friction plate giving slip. There is plenty of doucumented evidence to suggest air locked clutch hydraulics and badly fitted slave cylinders can cause clutch slip over on the cayman forum. In my case as in those on the cayman forum , the pedal felt as though it had not returned fully when the clutch slip was experienced. Sorry RFM , but I disagree with your comment , as having replaced the clutch with a new item , the biteing point is still at the same high point. The removed clutch and flywheel do not look worn out or damaged to an extent of causing the slippage I experienced. None of the parts were covered under warranty , so ripping out a clutch on a low mileage car , would I suggest , be a last resort. Checking the operation of the slave cylinder and bleeding/ renewing the clutch hydraulics is a far cheaper option as a first action to cure the problem.

Edited by berty987
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
The pressure plate is a special construction with a automatic adjusting system witch compensate the thickness off the clutch plate during his live, to maintain the biting point at the same possition, worn or new. It is not possible to reset the pressure plate what means that the pressure plate and the clutch plate have to be changed as a unit ( 997 - 987 )

Perhaps that you find out the problem in this area, the biting point is approx. 1/4 travel. Slave or other cylinders have nothing to do with clutch slip.

Regards.

This is actually only featured on the 997S. His 987 clutch is the same style as the 986 ones. Either way if it really isn't grabbing until your foot is practically off the pedal it sounds like there is a problem. A high bite point and or a stiff pedal are the two signs of a worn clutch and its completely possible for the previous owner to have worn it out in 3000 miles. However there are other causes for a high bite point (hydraulic) as other people have mentioned. If you take it in for service they should be able to tell you pretty soon if you have a problem or not as the service guys drive the cars all day long so they know what the normal feel is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Take a look at the LUK web site regarding clutch diagnosis here : http://159.51.238.62/remotemedien/media/_s...nose_PKW_en.pdf

Test your clutch as per the instructions and put your mind at rest. As you can see from MY posts I have a brand new (under 5 K miles ) clutch in my 987 boxster S. The biting point is unchanged from where it was before the clutch was changed and is still on the second half of the clutch travel. Reading the post from PTC , there is obviously no automatic adjustment on the clutch. As to the clutch types , the 987 now uses the same clutch as was used on the 986 , only the 987S with the six speed gearbox (or 2.7 fitted with 6 speed) uses the new clutch assembly. The friction plate is the same as used in the cayman, but the cover plate is not so highly sprung. The OEM cayman cover plate is referenced in the sachs parts list as the upgrade or heavy duty application for the 987S boxster. The other further upgrade is the hand built performance clutch which uses a completely different design of cover plate and upgraded friction material on the linings , complimented by an upgraded release bearing. If your clutch does need doing , then personally i'd spend the extra having either the performance clutch or the cayman cover plate fitted. I purchased an origianl Sachs clutch kit for a little over 200 UK pounds , fitting was about 6 hours at a local independant.

I replaced my clutch because of slip , but the friction material , cover plate and flywheel all looked though there was no undue wear - certainly not worn out. As in earlier posts I would stress that the clutch can have a delay in taking up , or a high biting point due to the hydraulics either being air locked , or the slave cylinder sticking. Both are documented faults and relatively cheap to fix compared to a new clutch. Like you , I read around on the subject of clutch life and the normal expectancy seems to be 60-80k. Certainly looking at the friction material on my 26k clutch that was removed , I would agree with that statement. If you ride the clutch in traffic on a daily basis , or do a lot of track work , i would expect a corresponding drop in expected clutch life.

Edited by berty987
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.