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What Gen is my 2004 C4S Cab??


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Welcome to RennTech:welcomeani:

 

If the car has its original engine, you have a single row  IMS bearing.  The single row is the most problematic version, with a failure rate somewhere above 8-10%.  If you want to confirm the engine's year, read the numbers off the oil sump rail.

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Greetings.  I think you will enjoy reading about your car.

But don't let everything drive you crazy.

Strongly consider getting the IMS fix from LNE no matter what.  You will have peace of mind.

I found my 2003 C4$ with about 13k miles.  Clearly under driven.  This can often be the indication of problems to come. 

Really.  Others will tell you this as well.

I believed I was gifted with a C4$ with a good IMS.  It still looks good sitting on my workbench in the garage.  Next to the timing chain tensioners from my 911SC, and the really interesting internal oil pump from the 3.0 engine.  I had to fix a main bearing at 130K.  Sold car with 325k.  All these parts look great, although the IMS bearing is not all that interesting.  You need to have one of these things on your bench as well.

Most seriously, all kidding aside, if you are thinking about the IMS fix just do it and get over the worries.  Just because.

Get a bearing for your desk, do the LNE fix and get many more good nights of mostly worry free sleep.

Good thoughts.  You have a great car.  Mine's a 6-speed, clearly my last manual trans.  You might put up a pic, the compliments will no doubt be gratifying.

 

 

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I would have to concur on replacing the IMS bearing.  Personally, I am very partial to the LN IMS Solution oil fed solid bearing system, which is the only permanent retrofit on the market.  I have them in both my and the Mrs's cars, and sleep better at night knowing they are there.

 

While the Solution is more expensive, it's outstanding reputation and long life expectancy are major factors when it comes time to sell the vehicle as cars with them typically draw more money at resale. 

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Yes, thanks, JFP, right on the money.

I had the LNE replacement done at 35k, and had planned to do another with the newer part, 2.2, I think, at 75k.             .

I learned somewhere in another thread that the LNE replacement bearing needed to be redone at about 50k miles.  

I'm at about 55k miles, and I now convinced that changing over to "the solution" is the best approach.

So, Keith, you should get that done. I'm going to do it when replacing the present LNE fix in a few more k miles.  Ultimately, I think it is always best to be proactive, if not aggressive, in maintenance and upgraded equipment.  As the saying goes, a stitch in time saves nine.

JFP and I agree, do it and get a good nights sleep.

There are 2 well-known Porsche precedents to this procedure.  

1) The first 3.0 SC's came out with sealed hydraulic tension chain tensioners.  If not regularly changed out, the tensioner might fail and instantly destroy the engine.  The fix was bolting on 2 oil feed hydraulic tensioners.  It was a classic after-market fix, and was incorporated by the factory onto the SC's engine in 2004.

2) The next classic design failure came with the bosch cis injection system on the 3.0.  Simply put, when starting the engine ice cold, the air mix box could not handle the fuel pressure and just blew up.  Really.  The simple after market bolt on solution was to cut a hole in the box and add on a spring-held flipper cap.  When the pressure built up too much, the cap would open and let in out and the box would not explode.  You could sometimes hear it "pop" from the driver's seat when starting the engine.  Yes, also led to factory redesign.

So Porsche has a history of other design defects taken care of by later engine manufacture modifications.  The similarity of the LNE fix to the tensioner fix is remarkable.  As said, I intend to do this to my car in the future, having already had the LNE IMS fix installed.

Good luck.  You might consider posting up what you decide to due.  Cheers, j

  

 

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5 hours ago, judgejon said:

Yes, thanks, JFP, right on the money.

I had the LNE replacement done at 35k, and had planned to do another with the newer part, 2.2, I think, at 75k.             .

I learned somewhere in another thread that the LNE replacement bearing needed to be redone at about 50k miles.  

I'm at about 55k miles, and I now convinced that changing over to "the solution" is the best approach.

So, Keith, you should get that done. I'm going to do it when replacing the present LNE fix in a few more k miles.  Ultimately, I think it is always best to be proactive, if not aggressive, in maintenance and upgraded equipment.  As the saying goes, a stitch in time saves nine.

JFP and I agree, do it and get a good nights sleep.

There are 2 well-known Porsche precedents to this procedure.  

1) The first 3.0 SC's came out with sealed hydraulic tension chain tensioners.  If not regularly changed out, the tensioner might fail and instantly destroy the engine.  The fix was bolting on 2 oil feed hydraulic tensioners.  It was a classic after-market fix, and was incorporated by the factory onto the SC's engine in 2004.

2) The next classic design failure came with the bosch cis injection system on the 3.0.  Simply put, when starting the engine ice cold, the air mix box could not handle the fuel pressure and just blew up.  Really.  The simple after market bolt on solution was to cut a hole in the box and add on a spring-held flipper cap.  When the pressure built up too much, the cap would open and let in out and the box would not explode.  You could sometimes hear it "pop" from the driver's seat when starting the engine.  Yes, also led to factory redesign.

So Porsche has a history of other design defects taken care of by later engine manufacture modifications.  The similarity of the LNE fix to the tensioner fix is remarkable.  As said, I intend to do this to my car in the future, having already had the LNE IMS fix installed.

Good luck.  You might consider posting up what you decide to due.  Cheers, j

  

 

 

Actually, if you check LN's website, they have upped the suggested replacements to 75K miles for most of their ceramic hybrids.

 

Both Charles and Jake have consistently taken a conservative view on the life expectancy for the ceramic hybrid IMS bearings, but as more data has been collected over time (9 years of successful field usage), they have expanded the unit's useful life.

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