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JFP in PA

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Posts posted by JFP in PA

  1. Welcome to RennTech :welcomeani:

    P2177 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Lower Load Range, Bank 1 (FRAU1) – Above Limit

     

    Possible fault cause

    - Intake air system leaking

    - Leaking exhaust system (draws fresh air)

    - Incorrect main charge signal from MAF sensor

    - Fuel pressure too low

    - Fuel injector(s) mechanically faulty (sticks)

    - Volume supply of fuel pump too low

     

    P2179 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Lower Load Range, Bank 2 (FRAU2)

     

    - Above Limit Possible fault cause

    - Intake air system leaking

    - Leaking exhaust system (draws fresh air)

    - Incorrect main charge signal from MAF sensor

    - Fuel pressure too low

    - Fuel injector(s) mechanically faulty (sticks)

    - Volume supply of fuel pump too low

     

    Since this affects both banks - it looks like you likely have an air leak.

    • Thanks 1
  2. 12 minutes ago, JE 17 said:

    I understand that. 

    The diagnostic appears to require a special tool (9637) which I can't seem to find anywhere, and I'm not sure it would be cost-effective if I did. I'm not good at all with electronics and accept that. I see I'll need to consult a professional on this unless I get lucky and trip over the cause. In that case, I'm sure I'll win the Cayman GT4 in club drawing too!

     

     

    The magic "pin out box", made by special order by the elf's of the Black Forest, with a $2,000+ price tag.  What it does is to allow you to connect a multimeter to circuits that are already completely connected and test for voltage and/or continuity.  In reality, you can do the same thing with thin wire back pin probes that slip into the rear of the car's connectors and get the same readings:

     

    spacer.png 

     

    spacer.png

    No where as elegant as the factory pinout box, but they are one Hell of a lot cheaper and get the job done.

  3. 1 minute ago, JE 17 said:

    So it doesn't appear my Durametric will be of much help. Great.

     

     

    You Durametric system is as close as you are going to get to something like the PIWIS without spending $20,000 to lease a factory tool.  The Durametric is very capable, I use one my self for most things.  But on thing you need to remember: Diagnostic tools only give you a sense of direction, not a set of directions; so any of them, including the almighty PIWIS, are only as good as the intuition of the operator.  Diagnostic's are slow and often arduous, often leading down several dead ends before your find the actual problem by a process of elimination.

  4. 14 hours ago, JE 17 said:

    I got the full 850cc fuel volume as specified. So now I'm left with this electronic problem which appears to require a factory tool. Am I correct?

     

     

    A "global" OBD II scanner (read on OEM tool) should be able to see a lot of things, but when you get down to the more difficult diagnostics, a Porsche specific tool like the Durametric system, PST II, or PIWIS can see thing that the global tool cannot, and most global tools are incapable of doing system actuations for test purposes.

  5. P0650 Check Engine Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) – Open Circuit

    P0650 Check Engine Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) – Below Limit

    P0650 Check Engine Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) – Above Limit

    Check wiring from DME control module, pin IV/31, to instrument cluster for continuity.

    1. Connect special tool 9637 to wiring harness (DME control module connector).

    2. Remove connector X 2/3.

    3. Connect ohmmeter to special tool 9637, pin IV/31, and to X 2/3 on pin side, pin 11.

    Display: 0 - 5 ohms

    If infinite ohms is displayed, check wiring harness for chafing and pinching damage.

    4. Remove connector III of instrument cluster.

    5. Connect ohmmeter to X 2/3, sleeve side, and to connector III of instrument cluster, pin 2.

    Display: 0 - 5 ohms

    If infinite ohms is displayed, check wiring harness for chafing and pinching damage.

    Check wiring from DME control module, pin IV/31, to instrument cluster for short to ground.

    1. Connect special tool 9637 to wiring harness (DME control module connector).

    2. Remove connector III of instrument cluster.

    3. Connect ohmmeter to special tool 9637, pin IV/31, and ground.

    Display: infinite ohms

    If 0 - 5 ohms is displayed, check wiring harness for chafing and pinching damage.

    Check wiring from DME control module, pin IV/31, to instrument cluster for short to B+.

    1. Connect special tool 9637 to wiring harness (DME control module connector).

    2. Remove connector III of instrument cluster.

    3. Switch on the ignition.

    4. Connect voltmeter to special tool 9637, pin IV/31, and ground.

    Display: 0 V

    If battery voltage is displayed, check wiring harness for chafing and pinching damage.

  6. 7 hours ago, Amber Wells said:

    1998 manual transmission refresh!

     

    A bit of info:

    I am in the process of doing the ever-daunting swap for my 2.5 1997 Boxster w/ tiptronic, for the 5spd manual transmission out of a 3.2 1998 Boxster.

     

    My question is: I am looking at the guide sleeve assembly in the transmission. Its the sleeve that the throwout bearing slides on to. Porsche charges $79.34 (on sale) for a new one (mfg# 012141180B). I'm hoping to save $80 by cleaning up and reusing the current one(as long as its not damaged) but, replacing the seal. Does anyone know the part # for the rear round rubber seal that comes with the assembly brand new? And, is there anything else recommended I replace from the assembly if I use the old sleeve?

     

    TIA

     

    Board sponsor Sunset Porsche sells that new part for $47.44.

  7. I would test both the battery (load test) and the charging system before replacing anything.  If either is weak, replacing it should clear the code.

     

    It may be possible that the sensor can be replaced if it is a serviceable item (not all are) but you need to know if it is a ghost code caused by the battery/charging system before doing anything else.  If the sensor is not serviceable, the PDK has to come out and be replaced, they cannot always be serviced in the field, even by a dealer.

  8. 10 hours ago, EMC2 said:

    Just to clarify - I know the post is old but I just came across it;

     

    5 inches of water column was for some of the earlier generations.

    The 997.2 will have more in the range of 12 to 18inches.

    This is based on measurements across several form member vehicles tested and also confirmed recently in one of Jake Raby's videos.

     

    On the 9X6 and 9X7 Porsches, the engine crankcase vacuum reading is normally in the region of -4.0” to -6.0” H2O (Inches of water). When an oil separator fails, the crankcase vacuum can rise to -10.0” to -15.0” H2O, or even much worse (-40.0” H2O) depending on the extent of AOS failure.

     

    On the 9X7.2 and 9X1 Porsches, the engine crankcase vacuum reading is normally in the region of -14.0” to -16.0” H2O (Inches of water). When an oil separator fails, the crankcase vacuum can rise to -20.0” to -25.0” H2O, or even much worse (-30 to -40.0” H2O) depending on the extent of AOS failure.

  9. One of the biggest problems is that Porsche stopped publishing vehicle service manuals after 2004, going to an online system that is built into the PIWIS system, which is a lease only diagnostic system with a first year's lease at $20,000.  So basic service information became very scarce.

     

    To my knowledge, the filter unit itself is not very prone to causing problems.  I would make sure all the lines were free flowing, blowing them out with compressed air to be sure, and that the valves were tested for functionality (they are a simple open/closed action, operated electrically).

  10. Working from memory here, so bear with me: To gain access to the canister remove the black plastic cover over the brake booster. Its in front of the battery, near the center of the vehicle but slightly towards the pass. side. The cover is held in with maybe 8 Philips screws. Once that is removed you will see there is a plastic bracket that holds the canister to the body, if I remember right its held in with a T40 screw. After that you have two "quick" disconnect lines on the bottom of the canister and one electrical connector on the top of the canister. Its kind of a beast to get out, the connections on the bottom of the canister are tricky to get to.

  11. Welcome to RennTech :welcomeani:

    Noting your comment about rodents, there is a flap valve in the gas fill neck that is operated by a combination of a switch and magnet that has to open for gas to flow in.  It is located on the side of the filler neck itself.  I would start there, checking the associated wiring for damage.  This diagram if for an earlier Boxster, but you can see the controls near the top of the filler neck, yours should be similar:

     

    spacer.png

     

    Good luck, rodent damage is always a pain to work on.

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