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jjb7

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About jjb7

  • Rank
    Contributing Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

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  • From
    South Ogden Utah
  • Porsche Club
    PCA (Porsche Club of America)
  • Present cars
    '99 996 Cabriolet, '04 Volvo S60R
  • Future cars
    Boxster

Recent Profile Visitors

419 profile views
  1. The Tip has a vent valve to exhaust any vapor produced by overfilling. I learned this by watching a video produced by Porsche.
  2. check all the microswitches. Most likely the left or right flaps. there is a lid "locked" microswitch.
  3. Serbox, I've got bad news. The tiptronic should only lose 3.5 liters when drained. I was performing the periodic fluid change for my 996, and had to put in over 5 liters. I did not keep track of how much came out (mistake). The tranny started to shudder and fail to shift into gear. It would shift out, the RPMs go up, then it would slam into gear. I performed the fill procedure 3 more times. during a test run, the tranny went into limp mode and threw a code, Solenoind 2 failure. I thought great. I would just fix it, and went to drop the valve body. Inside the oil pan I found gear teeth. Time for a new tranny. I am still in the process of replacing it. Also, I recovered 9 quarts. Apparently, the torque converter seal fails which would explain the excessive fluid loss. So, if your tranny shudders or over revs the engine when shifting, perform an oil change. If you recover more than 3.5 liters, consider having the TC seal replaced. PS I understand it is almost impossible to overfill a Tiptronic.
  4. No. Sir Tools is "redesigning" the tool Won't be able to ship until August. Unfortunately, my Porsche is broken now. I will have to get one manufactured. So, could you re-post the dimensions in a legible manner?
  5. I recently got the opportunity to replace my Tiptronic 5HP19HL transmission in my '99 996. I understand that the "Mercedes-Benz" 722.23 tranny is more robust. Which transmission should I put in? And will I need a newer TCU?
  6. I have a '99 996 with 110K miles. When do I know to change the CV joints? Also, the parts diagram calls for two joints per car (inner). What about the outer joints?
  7. Off hand, sounds like a vacuum leak. The two main culprits are the oil filler tube or the AOS bellows. good luck.
  8. Congrats. I hit 100K a month ago. Now comes maintenance.
  9. I own a 99 996 Cab NA daily driver with comfort memory seats. I am six foot. When I am in the proper driving position, my helmet hits the roof. I must move farther back. I am about an inch too tall. Does the sport seat sit lower? Or is it the manual sliders that lower the seat? This is my daily driver, so I don't want to install bucket seats.
  10. It is the lock assembly. Porche redesigned several times. It is a dealer stock item. I had the same problem. That fixed it.
  11. After you remove the belt, it is a great time to remove the idler rollers and lubricate them. Use fine steel wool to knock off the crud from the bolts. Do not remove the coating on the bolt. Then use lithium grease, graphite, or molybenum to lubricate the bolt and bronze bushing. Use only a smear. The roller should spin noticeably better.
  12. How to Replace the AOS Bellows You will need a pliers, bellows, and size 20 EZ hose clamp. Must be the type that can be finger tightened. Nylon zip ties with not work. They have a maximum operating temperature of 185 F. Remove the driver's side rear tire and place on stand. Verify broken bellows. Take your left hand, start from the front of the wheel hub and guide it into the cavity between the engine and transmission. When you pass the chassis wall, turn right and up. There you should feel the bellows and two hose clamps. Gently feel around for a crack in the bellows. Remove your hand and get a pliers. Hold the head of the pliers with fore finger and thumb. Locate one of the hose clamps and grip the tabs with the pliers. Shift your grip of the pliers to your palm while holding the head onto the clamp tab. Squeeze and wiggle the clamp while pushing towards the middle of the bellows. This will take a few tries. Once the clamp is free of the pipe, pry the bellows end off the pipe. Remove clamp and repeat for other end. Pull out the bellows. Clean hands off excess oil. Open the new hose clamps so that the bellows can slip freely into the clamp. The bellows has a flange larger than the body. Take one clamp and place it on the lower pipe. Take the bellows and seat it onto the upper pipe. Feel around the entire pipe to ensure proper seating. Push the lower end of the bellows to the back of the lower pipe. Then pull the bellows onto the pipe and into the clamp. You may have to stick your finger inside the bellows to work it onto the pipe. Be careful using pliers to pull the bellows, as not to tear it. Once the bellows is mostly on the pipe, slide the clamp up to the top end and seat on the collar. Tighten until snug. Do not over tighten, the clamp can cut the bellows. Free the bottom of the bellows and push to the rear. Take the second clamp and place it onto the pipe. Re-seat the bellows into the clamp. Seat the clamp onto the flat collar area and tighten. Done. When I started this, the vacuum measured 3 inches of water. I put the bellows on with out clamps, 5 in. With clamps 5.5 to 6 in. Still looking for more leaks. Author jjb7 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 07/21/2014 09:53 AM  
  13. You will need a pliers, bellows, and size 20 EZ hose clamp. Must be the type that can be finger tightened. Nylon zip ties with not work. They have a maximum operating temperature of 185 F. Remove the driver's side rear tire and place on stand. Verify broken bellows. Take your left hand, start from the front of the wheel hub and guide it into the cavity between the engine and transmission. When you pass the chassis wall, turn right and up. There you should feel the bellows and two hose clamps. Gently feel around for a crack in the bellows. Remove your hand and get a pliers. Hold the head of the pliers with fore finger and thumb. Locate one of the hose clamps and grip the tabs with the pliers. Shift your grip of the pliers to your palm while holding the head onto the clamp tab. Squeeze and wiggle the clamp while pushing towards the middle of the bellows. This will take a few tries. Once the clamp is free of the pipe, pry the bellows end off the pipe. Remove clamp and repeat for other end. Pull out the bellows. Clean hands off excess oil. Open the new hose clamps so that the bellows can slip freely into the clamp. The bellows has a flange larger than the body. Take one clamp and place it on the lower pipe. Take the bellows and seat it onto the upper pipe. Feel around the entire pipe to ensure proper seating. Push the lower end of the bellows to the back of the lower pipe. Then pull the bellows onto the pipe and into the clamp. You may have to stick your finger inside the bellows to work it onto the pipe. Be careful using pliers to pull the bellows, as not to tear it. Once the bellows is mostly on the pipe, slide the clamp up to the top end and seat on the collar. Tighten until snug. Do not over tighten, the clamp can cut the bellows. Free the bottom of the bellows and push to the rear. Take the second clamp and place it onto the pipe. Re-seat the bellows into the clamp. Seat the clamp onto the flat collar area and tighten. Done. When I started this, the vacuum measured 3 inches of water. I put the bellows on with out clamps, 5 in. With clamps 5.5 to 6 in. Still looking for more leaks.
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