Jump to content

The RennTech.org community is Member supported!  Please consider an ANNUAL donation to help keep this site operating.
Click here to Donate

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Brake Fluid


normank

Recommended Posts

I hear the castrol SRF is VERY hygroscopic and needs to be replaced often. It is also VERY expensive. Most guys I know, myself included, use Motul 600 or ATE Blue Racing fluid.

Flash

How often do you change it? Is it a time and/or miles calculation or can you test it. I would also be interested in what you do about oil.

Thanks for your input.

Norman

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is there a difference between the high end, high temp brake fluids like:

Castrol SRF

ATE Super Blue

Motul

How often does it need to be changed and/or how can you tell?

Sorry, but Flash is mistaken. While SRF *is* very expensive ($75 a liter), it is radically less hygroscopic than ATE. I have no first-hand experience with Motul.

After years of using ATE super blue (and Typ 200--same thing but gold) in 2 996 track cars (one a GT3) and my BMW track and race cars, I got fed up with soft pedals and bleeding brakes. SRF is not a one-bleed-a-season miracle cure, but I have not had to bleed my brakes during a 3-day race or DE weekend since I went to SRF (I used to need to bleed daily with ATE). So far, SRF has lasted 5 to 1 to ATE in volume (waaaay less bleeding), and the time saved alone is worth its cost.

I didn't believe it until I tried it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

For a street car you can't go wrong with Ate. It has slightly higher boiling points then the stuff sold by Porsche. I think Porsche says to change it every 2 years. I'm talking about a street car.

http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=2810

Most of the local owners use Ate, the amber or blue. It is about $10 a liter and you will use about 2/3rds of the can. The amber and blue stuff have the same specs. The blue stuff is just a dye. It has been said that the blue stuff is called "racing" because it is not DOT approved because of the dye. To be DOT approved brake fluid is supposed to be an amber color. From the picture you can see the boiling points for both are the same.

post-4-1190476267_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After years of using ATE super blue (and Typ 200--same thing but gold) in 2 996 track cars (one a GT3) and my BMW track and race cars, I got fed up with soft pedals and bleeding brakes. SRF is not a one-bleed-a-season miracle cure, but I have not had to bleed my brakes during a 3-day race or DE weekend since I went to SRF (I used to need to bleed daily with ATE). So far, SRF has lasted 5 to 1 to ATE in volume (waaaay less bleeding), and the time saved alone is worth its cost.

I didn't believe it until I tried it.

QP

I'm very new to all this so bear with me. When you say "bleed" do you mean "change" the brake fluid? At the moment, I'm not in a position to do it myself. What's involved and how do you know you need to do it? Thanks for your help.

By the way I had the brake fluid changed to ATE Super Blue after 3 DE's (novice). I ran 1 DE and am now moving to the intermediate group. I'm guessing that I will need to pay more attention to the brake fluid and oil as I progress.

Norman

Edited by normank
Link to comment
Share on other sites

QP

I'm very new to all this so bear with me. When you say "bleed" do you mean "change" the brake fluid? At the moment, I'm not in a position to do it myself. What's involved and how do you know you need to do it? Thanks for your help.

By the way I had the brake fluid changed to ATE Super Blue after 3 DE's (novice). I ran 1 DE and am now moving to the intermediate group. I'm guessing that I will need to pay more attention to the brake fluid and oil as I progress.

Norman

Norman, Loren's DIY tells you how to bleed using a power bleeder. But, keep your car serviced and don't worry about brake fluid, tires, etc. until you start outdriving (or in my case, overdriving) your equipment. Presuming you're driving a GT3 or RS around the track, congratulations! Your equipment should be fine until you start overbraking or really get going fast enough that you need to put that much heat into the braking system.

You will know you need to bleed your brakes by your pedal starting to feel soft when you are braking. Don't worry, this is not something you have to be looking for, you will know when it happens. And, it is simply compensated for by [a] pushing harder and then pumping the brake pedal in an extreme situation. That said, learn the line, be smooth and make sure your brakes have been bled within your region's requirements.

Regarding definitions, bleeding as I use it means getting the air and any contaminated fluid out of your calipers and close vicinity. In my vocabulary, flush means replacing as much old fluid for new, as can be done, plus a little extra to make sure you have as much air and water out of your brake and clutch system as possible. BTW, all brake fluid is hygroscopic (it absorbs moisture), and the pedal goes soft because the water boils and becomes vapor and vapor compresses (this is where the soft pedal comes from), whereas liquids do not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QP

I'm very new to all this so bear with me. When you say "bleed" do you mean "change" the brake fluid? At the moment, I'm not in a position to do it myself. What's involved and how do you know you need to do it? Thanks for your help.

By the way I had the brake fluid changed to ATE Super Blue after 3 DE's (novice). I ran 1 DE and am now moving to the intermediate group. I'm guessing that I will need to pay more attention to the brake fluid and oil as I progress.

Norman

Norman, Loren's DIY tells you how to bleed using a power bleeder. But, keep your car serviced and don't worry about brake fluid, tires, etc. until you start outdriving (or in my case, overdriving) your equipment. Presuming you're driving a GT3 or RS around the track, congratulations! Your equipment should be fine until you start overbraking or really get going fast enough that you need to put that much heat into the braking system.

You will know you need to bleed your brakes by your pedal starting to feel soft when you are braking. Don't worry, this is not something you have to be looking for, you will know when it happens. And, it is simply compensated for by [a] pushing harder and then pumping the brake pedal in an extreme situation. That said, learn the line, be smooth and make sure your brakes have been bled within your region's requirements.

Regarding definitions, bleeding as I use it means getting the air and any contaminated fluid out of your calipers and close vicinity. In my vocabulary, flush means replacing as much old fluid for new, as can be done, plus a little extra to make sure you have as much air and water out of your brake and clutch system as possible. BTW, all brake fluid is hygroscopic (it absorbs moisture), and the pedal goes soft because the water boils and becomes vapor and vapor compresses (this is where the soft pedal comes from), whereas liquids do not.

QP

Thanks for painting that clear picture. I suspect you are correct on every point. I spend a good deal of time on the track reminding myself not to over drive, which is a major problem with a GT3. Smooth is fast and stay off the grass (although I have been told grass is a racing surface and makes the car go faster).

Norman

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.