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Hi everyone.

 

I have an 02 996 C4 cabriolet with relatively low mileage, 100,000 km.

It has never had its spark plugs done.  There are no issues with the car, but it sounds like it might be a good idea.  

I have read all sorts of threads on this.

Some people say it is so easy and they can do it in like an hour without removing anything from the car.

Others say its really difficult and they take off the mufflers, bumpers, etc just to get access.

 

I am not someone that has done a lot of work on cars, and I don't have all sorts of ratchets, etc to work in cramped corners so I think I'd rather do it the second way.

 

What is best access then to do spark plugs in terms of hoisting up the car.

Currently I have two jacks, two jackstands and two rhino ramps.   

I worry that if  I use the rhino ramps then if I get access issues I won't be able to remove the rear wheels.

 

Thanks for any help!

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Loren I did read that.  

So ramps are out then if you have to remove the rear wheels.

Can i just do 2 jackstands on the rear then with the front wheels chocked for this or do I actually have to get underneath the car?

 

PS I don't like the idea of getting under a car!

Edited by muranomike
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17 minutes ago, muranomike said:

Thanks Loren I did read that.  

So ramps are out then if you have to remove the rear wheels.

Can i just do 2 jackstands on the rear then with the front wheels chocked for this or do I actually have to get underneath the car?

 

 

I personally don't see how you are going to complete this without getting under at least the rear of the car.

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Yes, I have done that. I have used jack stands plus leaving the up on the side I am working on (jack stand carries the weight and the jack is fall protection. 

As II said in the DIY the mufflers are easy to remove and then the spark plugs are clear to work on.

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I just replaced my plugs and coils this past weekend. I utilized jack stands as Loren described. You will want to get the tires off to have the needed access.  Also, recommend replacing the coils while you at it. I had misfire on cylinder 3, which was caused by the coil, hence my fun over the weekend. The older style coils are prone to failure. Good luck!

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Ok so rear jack stands, wheels off, front wheels chocked.

I worry about the car slipping forward if I raise the back  too high.  Maybe thats unwarranted fear with good jack stands.  

How high are most people comfortable getting the rear end up without putting front jack stands to level it out?

 

Also as this is an 02' it doesn't have spark plug tubes, but there are seals.  Are these necessary to replace or just if I find oil on some of the plugs?

 

Thanks guys!

 

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You’re on the right track from my perspective. I had my jack stands at the lowest possible height, therefore, no worries about roll or other movement. Also, working from my back, I did not want to have to reach up any higher than necessary.

I have tubes, so I’ll defer to the other great experienced minds on our forum.


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Thanks so much.

 

Do you suggest I just wait until I get a misfire code or some other issue before changing them out?

Its not my daily driver so I can so its not essential that it stays running..

 

These are my original spark plugs, but as I said I am having NO issues and car is running great..

 

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Spark plugs are a maintenance item. For my 01 C2 the maintenance schedule for the sparks plugs is 50K miles. My plugs and coils had a little over 48K miles when I replaced them last weekend. The plugs looked pretty good. I had a crack in the number 3 cylinder coil pack, which were the old 996 version. I’m the type of person who enjoys doing their own maintenance within skills and abilities, therefore, I stick to Porsche’s maintenance schedule unless I read about experiences and advice on our forum (i.e., scheduled water pump replacement). Also, like yours, my car is not a daily driver. So, when I jump in to go for a ride, I want my 911 in top running condition and not having to worry about when was the last time I performed maintenance. It’s worked for me in 40+ years of car ownership, and I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed assistance while out on the road.


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14 hours ago, muranomike said:

Ok so rear jack stands, wheels off, front wheels chocked.

I worry about the car slipping forward if I raise the back  too high.  Maybe thats unwarranted fear with good jack stands.  

How high are most people comfortable getting the rear end up without putting front jack stands to level it out?

 

Also as this is an 02' it doesn't have spark plug tubes, but there are seals.  Are these necessary to replace or just if I find oil on some of the plugs?

 

Thanks guys!

 

 

Unless you have a leak, leave them alone.  Job to replace them is a bear.

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  • 2 months later...

Just did this today, 2002 Carrera, 62k miles. I have done a ton of preventative maintenance over the 12 years I’ve owned this car. Too much to list, but suffice to say, if it is a known issue, I’ve either had it or prevented it! (So far). A very reduced usage DD, since I’m retired. I do all my own wrenching, except when it came time to do the clutch/RMS/IMS bearing and I had them done preventatively at 50k miles. Turns out clutch & RMS had been done before I got the car at 28k miles, and the IMS bearing was still sealed and like new. Still had them all replaced. The plugs & coils were on my list, and had bought them maybe 5 years ago, but car continued to run great so I just kept postponing it. Recently had CEL with 2 misfires, so I figured maybe it was time. Since I had already removed the mufflers many years ago to do the Fister type mod, and at that time I had replaced virtually all the exhaust nuts & bolts with SS versions & lock washers, dropping them as recommended was effortless. Just as Loren says, three nuts on the bracket (13mm) and the two on the clamp to the muffler inlet (15mm) and it easily pulls out towards the front. No bumper removal or tip removal required. Add me to the camp of “why anyone would try this without removing them is beyond me”. I honestly do not know how it can be done with them in place. The passenger side is far harder, especially the rearmost as mentioned, especially uncoupling the connection from the coil and removing the rearmost allen bolt. I used the “long thin screwdriver blade to unclip the tab that holds it in place and push it off the coil” trick. On my car, it appears the plugs were also done before I bought it, as they were Bosch Super 4 prong types, they were 5’s. Every single plug was too lightly torqued in! It was effortless to unscrew them all. But every plug had no sooting and all the tubes were still shiny & clean. No cracked Beru coils, they all looked good.  New coils were 997 types, and I decided to go with NGK Laser Platinum plugs as recommended. Had no trouble with removing/installing them with 3/8” drives a 3” extension, 6” extension and 2 universal swivels. I also recommend a long set of ball end metric allens as well as a tiny ratchet that takes a 5mm allen. Lowes has a Kobalt set for less than $20. Helps a lot.  No trouble using my old Sears torque wrench on all of the plugs, 22ft-lbs. I did unclip the  VarioCam Plus connectors for added clearance. I also spent some time cleaning some old oil grime from a previously weeping AOS (replaced at 45k) that got all over the VARIOCAM connectors on the drivers side, and cleaned the shields as well.

 

 My recommendation: first remove all the coils. Then remove the plugs, and install the new plug immediately after removal. Then install the coils from the rear, and completely install each one before heading to the next. On the rear most passenger side coil, which is VERY tight to couple the connector to the coil, just get it close to lined up with a screwdriver and then you can surprisingly easy push down on it from above, through the engine compartment! You can absolutely insure than satisfied click as the connection is made. Note that it is VERY easy to think you have it coupled fully but the tab will not have actually snapped over the small ramp lock. It would SUCK BIG TIME to find it worked loose and you have misfires and have to find which one is not making a good  connection anymore. Use that long skinny screwdriver to lift the rubber boot up, and visually see the tab is locked. Took me 4 hours to do the passenger side and an hour for the drivers side, but the passenger side included getting the car up, wheels off, etc, and I have an EZCar Lift so makes the job a lot easier. At 62, it’s not easy working on my back as it used to be, and my hands are not as nimble as they used to be, either. I changed the oil & filter while the car was up, also. Use Driven DT-40 and a Mobil1 M1-107 spin on with spin on filter adapter from Raby, done the year I bought the car. 
Car naturally idles better, and a slight lag at initial pedal was eliminated, but otherwise sounds and drives the same. 

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Ahh, the wonderful feeling of accomplishment in keeping the 996 maintained. Thank you for sharing your experience and tips!


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