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996 Lifters: Recommended Testing / Assembly Procedure?


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I'm doing a top-end refresh on my 2000 C2 as part of IMSB and timing correction. Looking for advice on how to evaluate / treat the lifters.

 

Background...

When I inspected the lifters, all look good cosmetically. When they came out of their cradle, they all were stiff as you would expect, except for one or two, but generally not squishy. At first, doing this for the first time, I thought that was a bad thing until reading up on it. As I understand it now, they should be stiff coming out of the engine and weep over time when outside of a pressurized environment. So when they remained "stuck" after being out for 2 weeks while I worked other items, I began to wonder if they were that way for all the wrong reasons. I worked them over a couple of days while I did other work, getting the old oil (very dirty) out of them. I gave them a hot bath in engine oil as some threads suggested to get the air out of them and to replenish with new oil. I was worried after a day that I should have left well enough alone as they were all still very pliable, so I did a repeat hot soak (forgive my novice terminology), depressing them each several times. After another 24 hours there's a huge noticeable difference. They're still not quite there yet, but maybe it's just a matter of time. The idea being if any cannot accept/retain the new oil, I'll replace them. I know that once in the car, if not damaged, they'll regain their appropriate state, but I want to make sure before they go back in that they have a likelihood of doing so.

 

Questions...
How long does it normally take for them to be soaking in oil before I can properly check them?
How much play should they have / not have?
If for argument sake, one or two are bad, do I need to replace the entire bank of them, all 4 associated with the respective cylinder, or just the bad one?

I found the OEM INAs on eEuroparts for 16.97ea. roughly $400 for all 24, which isn't bad, but I'm trying to keep costs down on this project (without doing something stupid along the way).

img_6461_lifters_d5d3c33980a0529a2940b3979f4bac7530bb2897.jpg

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These lifters have problems because of their design, which allows crud to accumulate inside their internal oil passages.  How long they need to soak is totally dependent on how badly they are fouled.

 

Normally, if we get a couple of bad units, we just replace them all with new.

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9 hours ago, JFP in PA said:

These lifters have problems because of their design, which allows crud to accumulate inside their internal oil passages.  How long they need to soak is totally dependent on how badly they are fouled.

 

Normally, if we get a couple of bad units, we just replace them all with new.

 

Thanks. I'm seriously considering that route.

 

Because I'm in wait mode (other parts / soaking bank 1), is it ok to open up bank 2 while bank 1 is open to do timing / refresh items, or is it best to have one side done before getting to work on the other side? I also have the water pump and oil drive / valve upgrade and just wondering about the best work sequence. I am assuming it's best to do the IMSB after I have everything timed as well. Thoughts?

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I will assume, for the sake of argument, that the engine is out of the car, which makes all of this one Hell of lot easier.

 

Yes, you can do both banks at the same time; this is the normal process in a from scratch engine assembly process, only you are doing it in reverse.  Where people tend to go wrong is when they hand rotated the engine with one or more banks completely out of cam allocation, not knowing you can actually damage valves doing that.

 

As for the IMS, once you have the cam allocations completed on both banks, you need to lock the engine at TDC, and lock the cams, before proceeding.

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2 hours ago, JFP in PA said:

I will assume, for the sake of argument, that the engine is out of the car, which makes all of this one Hell of lot easier.

 

Yes, you can do both banks at the same time; this is the normal process in a from scratch engine assembly process, only you are doing it in reverse.  Where people tend to go wrong is when they hand rotated the engine with one or more banks completely out of cam allocation, not knowing you can actually damage valves doing that.

 

As for the IMS, once you have the cam allocations completed on both banks, you need to lock the engine at TDC, and lock the cams, before proceeding.

Great... and yes, engine out. Can't imagine doing this work otherwise, at least with my abilities. And I understand need to lock TDC and cams for IMSB.

 

To be clear about concern for potential valve damage when rotating engine by hand, I am understanding that to mean that when I set timing on one side, I need to have the cams on the other side in place, possibly with cover on as well to make sure engine components are moving in their natural state... do I have the right? (I have a 5-chain engine.)

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