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As my X50 Turbo engine looks completely different underneath, can anyone shed any light on where I can locate my low profile jack to get the rear on stands?

Cheers

Mark

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As my X50 Turbo engine looks completely different underneath, can anyone shed any light on where I can locate my low profile jack to get the rear on stands?

Cheers

Mark

So for this question I consulted with Peter Smith who is a PCA technical consultant and the chief tech at Rector Porsche. The perfectly safe way to lift the engine is to position the jack on the case seam and lift. The further back toward the transmission you can place the jack saddle, the higher you will be able to lift the car. Of course, you just want to lift the car high enough to place the jack stands.

The engine case is extremely strong, remember on race cars the suspension, transmission etc. is bolted to it.

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The engine case is extremely strong, remember on race cars the suspension, transmission etc. is bolted to it.

that may be true, but I'd assume that most late model racecars are running the stronger turbo/GT2/GT3 dry sump block

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The engine case is extremely strong, remember on race cars the suspension, transmission etc. is bolted to it.

that may be true, but I'd assume that most late model racecars are running the stronger turbo/GT2/GT3 dry sump block

That is what the poster was asking about -- an X50 is a 996 TT with the upgraded engine.

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Before posting my question, I just want to say that I am new to this forum and that the wealth of info provided by this site via its members is amazing. Kudos and huge thanks to all of you for all your insight and sharing.

My question is as follows:

I notice that whenever I jack the rear of my 03 996 c4s on the large metal stub that is cast into the engine case (M96 unit), the weight of the car eventually pushes the muffler tips against the bumper facia exhaust cutouts.

Is this normal? Will this damage my frame or engine mounts in any way? I know that this is a tried and true method, but I end up "chickening out" and never commit because I feel that the amount of movement is excessive and that something very bad is going to happen...

Thanks and best regards,

Paul

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Paul:

There will be some compression of the motor mounts that will raise the engine a bit, and depending on how your muffler tips are set, they may hit the top of the bumper cover.

However, you should also inspect your motor mounts as they may have failed sometime in the past. Look for purple dribble stains of a dried liquid on where the motor mounts bolt to the engine carrier. If they have failed, now would be a good time to replace them.

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Paul:

There will be some compression of the motor mounts that will raise the engine a bit, and depending on how your muffler tips are set, they may hit the top of the bumper cover.

However, you should also inspect your motor mounts as they may have failed sometime in the past. Look for purple dribble stains of a dried liquid on where the motor mounts bolt to the engine carrier. If they have failed, now would be a good time to replace them.

Ah, that makes perfect sense and I feel at ease about this now. I'll check my mounts and if they look good, I will give it a go.

Thanks for the info.

Regards,

Paul

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