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teeerex

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About teeerex

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  • From
    Kent, UK
  • Porsche Club
    PCGB (Porsche Club Great Britain)
  • Present cars
    996 C4 Aero
  1. Works :) Thanks very much - as always this site is THE resource for Porsche fans :thankyou:
  2. Sorry another lost code - 996 C4 1999 Becker 1 4467 X5016794 49/98 Many thanks in advance, Richard.
  3. Hi .. I've done this a few times now with success but does anybody know the actual amounts required to flush each section of the pipework / calipers ? I have used about 1L in the past but this time I got a lot more out the resevoir to start - so ended up using 1.5L as folows :- 1. 500mL : Extracted from the resevoir before starting (using a syringe and length of plastic pipe to suck out as much as I could via the small holes after taking out the filter) 2. 150mL : Rear Left, Inside Nipple 3. 150mL : Rear Left, Ouside Nipple 4. 150mL : Rear Right, Inside Nipple 5. 150mL : Rear Right, Outside Nipple 6. 100mL : Clutch 7. 75mL : Front Left, Inside Nipple 8. 75mL : Front Left, Ouside Nipple 9. 75mL : Front Right, Inside Nipple 10. 75mL : Front Right, Outside Nipple The reason I went with only 150mL for the each front is because that's all I had left ! :( Do you think this is enough ? Should I get another 500mL and do the fronts again ? The brake pedal feels excellent now but I'm concerned I've just pushed the old fluid into the calipar (fronts) and the fresh fluid is in the pipework ... PS - This is Motul RBF660 for tracking (taking her on the Nurburgring again in a few weeks ..) so keen to have optimal brakes ! Thanks all, Richard.
  4. Hi - I'm not sure what the concensus is in the US but here in the UK it's frowned upon to run fog lamps when it's not foggy or visability is not seriously reduced (heavy rain etc). This is because the fog lamps blind oncoming traffic when they get in range of the (short) beam because it does not have any 'dipping' on it. Technically possible yes - but I'd question the use of it myself.
  5. If the car has been 'designed' to run like this then fine - in the above example on the C5, then I would imagine the front suspension is slightly harder than the fronts to make up for the lower tyre spring in the lower profile rear tyres - in other words keep it all balanced. Another way to put it is to say use 15" wheels on the fronts with full sized no tyres and 20" on the rear with /25 etc tyres - how would that handle ? (same rolling circumference - but radically different grip/roll characteristics. ) In a straight line, likely no difference at all, but I'd hate to see what happended when I took a corner at speed .. ;)
  6. Er... IMO not recommended at all. For one it will look odd (assuming your wheels are the same 'design', if not, then it will look horrendeous !) - but on the safety side then it's asking for trouble even if the tyres profiles 'should' even things up. I'm sure an insurance assessor would have something to say about it come pay out time when you end up backwards in a ditch... :( Replace all the wheels with 17" (better for winter driving due to higher profile tyre) and keep the 18" for summer (with lower profile tyres).
  7. That's not entirely accurate. Alternators do a much better job of charging at lower engine RPM, simply because they are geared higher and spin faster than generators did in the good old days. The commutators in generators could not survive very high speeds, and thus were geared lower so they would not over-speed at the highest engine speed. As a result their output at low speeds/idle was poor. Alternators do much better, but they do not generate as much power at idle as they do at even slightly higher RPM. Bill We seem to have gone way off topic .. but I enjoy a good old fashioned debate ;) In your last statement - are you comparing an alternator vs a generator at higher RPM as I'm confused with what you are saying? Or you are saying that an alternator does not generate equal power at idle than at say 1500RPM ? If so, then I have to disagree.. lol.. For those still interested - this link below explains the two in a lot more detail ... Alternator vs Generator/Dynamo
  8. Thanks wwest - I was well aware that I was over simplifiying things with todays alternators / regulators (trying to keep it simple!) - the other key fact of course is they supply a constant voltage/current regardless of RPM on the alternator itself, unlike a dynamo - all part of the regulator/electronics as you have said. All the best - Richard.
  9. Sounds to me like the alternator is not providing a charge to the battery - simply put if it's 14-14.4v then it is, if it's 12v or less then it's not. The alternator consists of two main parts, the generator (the large motor looking bit driven by the belt) - this generates Alternatng Current or AC voltage and the 'regulator' which is a series of things called diodes that convert the AC voltage into Direct Current (DC) that is used to charge/power your car. Now the interesting thing is I have heard you can just replace the regulator if that s the problem - there is no need to replace the entire unit. However, I'm not sure if this can be done it situ or whether the alternator needs to come out. For future refrence - the regulator is designed/rated to keep charge on an already charged battery - so using it to charge a flat batttery usually will strain the diodes in the regulator - possibly even overheat and destroy them. So if you ever get a flat battery - then charge from an external source - never from a 'long drive' after a quick jump start. As has been said - double check all the connections on the alternator / jump start points etc incl the main ground connection. To load test the alternator - (with a fully charged battery!) - run ALL the electrical items (full beam etc) and if the voltage is still 14-14.4v, then your alternator/regulator is good. I hope this helps ..
  10. Anything can be done if you have the parts, skills and the tools ! PSM takes it's inputs from the ABS sensors, steering rack and egas throttle - so a retro fit would need egas for sure. PSM will also need the brake line plumbing (as each wheel can be individually braked) as well as the electrical brain + all the looms. I think PSM came about in the C4 first (1998/1999) then in the first egas C2's (2000?) A LOT of work - just sell the car and get one with PSM ... it'll cost a lot less in the long run ... ;)
  11. The valves are made of brass (ie very soft) - therefore you will strip the threads if you do them up tight. My advise is to do them up until you get 'stop' resistance and then add max 1/8th turn more no more.
  12. to add to the above comment - once out, then grease up the runners and locking mechanism to make them go back in easier and also make them easier to get out next time .. ;)
  13. Check that the temperature sensor hasn't fallen out and onto the engine block - this will cause the fan to come on (been there done that). The sensor sits inbetween the 1st and 2nd induction tube on the top right hand side of the engine (looking at the rear of the car) - if it's not there, then that is your problem ... It should just slot back in - remove the rubber grommet, put the sensor back in, then put the whole lot back..
  14. Perfectly normal IMO. Due to the nature of the flat 6, oil will seep into the combustion chambers depending on how long the engine has been sitting unused. When you start her up - the oil will be burnt, hence the smoke. That said, some cars smoke more than others, the same way some use oil, whilist others use none ... If it only smokes a little and once after a cold startup, then I wouldn't worry about it - but if it happens on warm starts then it could be worn components / piston rings etc.
  15. Got all mine from Euro Car Parts (Original Porsche Parts) and went with Textar pads (OEM Pads, just not a Porsche box ...) Also try design911 but I've never used them myself ..
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