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whall

Carrera Instrument Cluster Transplant To Boxster

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Carrera Instrument Cluster Transplant To Boxster


Installing an MY02 Carrera C2 (Manual) Instrument Cluster in an MY03 Boxster (Manual) I have a few of general observations. First, I selected a Carrera C2 (manual transmission) instrument cluster because, having read through several threads on this forum, there didn’t appear to be any systems compatibility problems with the installation. For example, fuel gage problems with a C4 cluster (due to fuel tank design) or oil quantity/car leveling errors with a Turbo cluster (due to engine sump differences) were some of the problems to be avoided. Once the additional wire for the oil pressure gage is installed, the change over from Boxster cluster to Carrera cluster is truly “plug and play”. Second, it is essential to get a donor instrument cluster that is compatible with your car, in terms of original vs. “improved” cluster design. MY02 and subsequent 996 instrument clusters are improved. MY01 and subsequent 986 instrument clusters are improved. If you just have the hardware in hand, look at the color of the three plug receptacles on the back of the cluster. The original cluster has blue, white and black receptacles. The improved cluster has green, blue and gray receptacles. Third, there doesn’t seem to be a problem dealing with the MOST bus, or absence of the MOST bus. If the installation is done in a MOST bus equipped Boxster, the only anomaly will be the “Porsche Protected” display on the CDR23 radio. This is corrected using a re-coding routine by a PIWIS. If the Boxster being modified doesn’t have the MOST bus (pre-MY03), then entering the radio security code is the only step required after hooking up the battery at the end of the installation. Fourth, because my car is still under CPO warranty, I had my Porsche dealer install the Carrera oil pressure sensor. I didn’t want any arguments if, down the road, there were any problems with the lubrication system that could possibly be attributed to me working on the engine. Fifth, I sent my Carrera instrument cluster to an instrument shop to have the mileage reset to approximate the mileage I anticipated to be on the Boxster when I affected the change. The mileage is stored in the instrument cluster and can’t be reset using a PST2 or PIWIS. I got a receipt from the instrument shop indicating the mileage they reset the odometer to. When the dealer re-coded the radio, I had them verify the mileage on the Boxster odometer and the mileage on the Carrera odometer. The dealer put both mileages on the work order and made an entry on page 1 of the maintenance booklet. Sixth, I had about 7/8 of a tank of gas in the car. Some of the threads I had read suggested that there would be a problem with the fuel quantity indication if the instrument cluster was changed when there was less than 19 liters/5 U.S. gallons of fuel in the tank. After the change, the Carrera instrument cluster fuel gage indicated the same quantity as before, 7/8 of a tank. Due to the winter weather, I haven’t driven the car enough to require a re-fuelling. But, the gage does seem to work properly. Last, my MY03 (e-gas) base Boxster was delivered with cruise control. I had done the OBC/4 stalk “hack” earlier. All functions of the cruise control and OBC work. The OBC display is in the “improved” instrument cluster, dot matrix format. REQUIRED PARTS New/used Carrera instrument cluster appropriate for Boxster, for example: P/N 996.641.223.00.70C Pressure Sensor, Engine Oil: P/N 996.606.203.01 New/used Cover, Instruments, for example: P/N 996.552.059.02 EFM (black) – if you want to use a Carrera part, otherwise modify the existing Boxster instrument cluster surround. Wire Pin: VW P/N 000.979.010 Heat Shrink Tubing: Radio Shack P/N 278-1611 Quick Disconnects: Radio Shack P/N 64-3132 Hook Up Wire, Stranded 20 Gage: Radio Shack P/N 278-1225 Tie Wraps: Radio Shack P/N 278-1631A Most of the Radio Shack sourced parts are well in excess to your needs. But for about $7.00 total expenditure……… REQUIRED TOOLS Ohmmeter 10mm socket with ratchet and short extension Soldering iron with rosin core solder Wire cutter Wire stripper Wire crimper Needle nosed pliers Small common screwdriver 24mm open end wrench T-30 Torx driver T-20 Torx driver 5mm hex key Ice pick or awl Scotch tape Wood matches or electric heat shrink heat gun Dremel tool with ½” sanding drum and 120 grit sanding bands (used if you modify the existing Boxster instrument cluster surround) INSTALLATION 1. Cut a length of about 12 feet of 20 gage, stranded hook up wire. Strip about ½ inch of insulation from one end. Crimp and/or solder a female, quick disconnect to the stripped end of the wire. This end of the wire will be attached later to the new Carrera oil pressure sensor. The other end of the new wire will be cut to proper length and stripped later. 2. Cut the wire pin (VW 000.979.010) in half. Strip about ¾ inch of insulation from the cut end. The stripped end of the wire pin will be attached to the new wire later. 3. Open the engine compartment using the procedures set forth in the owner’s manual (MY03, page 179). 4. From inside the car, remove the upholstery panel on back wall of passenger compartment. Slide both seats as far forward as they will go. Tip both seat backs forward as well. There are four large diameter plastic fasteners at the top of the upholstery panel, holding it in place. Use a small common screwdriver to loosen them; unscrew the fasteners. The upholstery is removed by pulling up on the panel. 5. Remove the forward engine compartment lid. There are seven 10mm bolts and two 10mm nuts. The lid may be difficult to remove if it hasn’t been off previously. 6. Remove the center console. a. Remove leather boot around the shift knob. The frame that holds the boot just unclips; pull the frame directly up. b. Remove the shift knob by pulling directly up. (Some knobs may have a 5mm setscrew). c. Remove the screw found at the forward end of the center console. Torx drive T-20. d. Unsnap left and right upper side covers from center console. e. Unsnap lower center console cover (batwing). f. Remove the CD holder (tape holder) and cubbyhole. They are removed by pulling straight back. g. Open center arm rest. Remove the rubber mat, the screw securing the plastic floor in the oddments tray and the plastic floor. Torx drive T-20 h. Remove screw found on the right forward side of the oddment tray. Torx drive T-20. i. Remove coin holder found on the left forward of the oddment tray. Use small common screwdriver to lift the coin holder directly up. j. Remove screw found under coin holder. Torx drive T-20. k. Remove ashtray (or rubber mat in non-smoker’s tray). Remove two plastic trim screws. Torx drive T-30. The plastic trim screws are threaded into two plastic bushings. If you’re not careful, you’ll loose one of the bushings. l. Pull up and remove the control panel by unclipping the ashtray light (if installed), unplugging the window operating switches and, if installed, the seat heat control switches. Use the small common screwdriver to gently pry the plugs off the switches. The plugs are tight. White switches – driver’s side. Black switches – passenger’s side. m. Remove screw found under the control panel. Torx T-20. n. Remove parking brake cover next to driver’s side seat belt fastener. Pull directly toward the driver’s seat. o. Tip passenger’s seat back all the way back, check all the wires and clips are clear, the parking brake is pulled back as much as it can be and remove center console. Lift the rear of the console while pulling back. If you have the alarm system, be sure the wire to the oddment tray latch is unplugged. p. Unclip window wire bundle from shifter base cover. q. Remove the shifter base cover. r. Using 10mm socket with ratchet and extension, loosen the four nuts that hold shifter assembly. Loosen just enough to be able to lift the shifter assembly up about ¼ - 3/8 inch. s. This information and photographs can be found at bmracing.com by downloading the B & M short shifter installation manual. And, it can be watched on 9X6 Werks, Vol. III. 7. Install Carrera oil pressure sensor. a. Put a cloth, or a blanket, over the right rear fender to protect the paint from scratches. b. The oil pressure sensor is located on the right side of the engine on the intake cam housing. c. Pull off the existing green/white wire off the Boxster oil pressure sensor. Leave the black rubber socket on the wire. d. Using a shop rag and/or small brush, clean the area around the oil pressure sensor of any dirt or debris. e. Use a 24mm open-end wrench to remove the Boxster oil pressure sensor. f. Install the Carrera oil pressure sensor. Tighten oil pressure sensor to 15+-3.5 ft-lbs g. Push the connector of the green/white wire onto oil pressure sensor terminal “WK” (the larger of the two terminals). Push the black socket down over the terminal. This terminal and electrical circuit provide a signal to the oil pressure “idiot light” on the Carrera instrument cluster. h. Push the connector of the new wire onto oil pressure sensor terminal “G” (the smaller of the two terminals). There is no socket available to cover terminal G. This terminal and electrical circuit provide a signal to the oil pressure gage on the Carrera instrument cluster 8. Route the new wire forward through the engine compartment. a. Run the wire down and forward toward the passenger compartment. Use a tie wrap to loosely hold the new wire to a wire bundle leading to a plug on the front end of the intake cam. From there, use three tie wraps to firmly (not tightly) hold the new wire to a solid, rubber covered pipe that runs low across the front of the engine compartment. b. From inside the passenger compartment, locate the rubber grommet, through which the shift cables run back to the transmission. Use an ice pick (or awl) to poke a hole through the center of the grommet. Be careful not to damage anything with the point of the ice pick. With the ice pick poked through the grommet, scotch tape the new wire to the tip of the ice pick. Slowly pull the ice pick out of the grommet while pushing the new wire through the grommet at the same time. Pull the new wire into the passenger compartment being careful not to disturb any of the tie wraps in the engine compartment. 9. Route the new wire forward under center console to the dashboard. a. Run the new wire forward between the shifter cables. b. Run the new wire under the shifter assembly, carefully keeping it from contacting any of the mounting bolts. It is possible to short the new wire to ground if it rubs up against the bolts when the nuts that secure the shifter assembly are tightened. (In the photograph below, the new wire is angled toward the shifter assembly's right forward mounting bolt. It was pinched and grounded when I tightened the shifter assembly.) c. Run the new wire up behind the CD holder and cubbyhole. d. Tighten the nuts that hold the shifter assembly. 10. Remove Boxster instrument cluster. a. Disconnect the cable from the negative battery terminal using the 10mm socket wrench. Cover the battery terminal to keep the cable from accidentally contacting the terminal. Depending on the Model Year, make sure the hood doesn’t get closed and locked. And, if needed, have the radio code handy. b. Press hazard-warning button so it projects out. The button can be pulled off by hand. If needed, a small common screwdriver can be used to help remove the button. With the button removed, access to the switch is available. On either side of the switch there are two locking tabs. With thumb and forefinger squeeze the tabs and simultaneously pull the switch out using the long nosed pliers. Behind the switch is one of the two cluster mounting screws. c. At the left side of the cluster, remove the trim plug/hand-free microphone. The plug can be removed if you have strong fingernails; or careful use a small common screwdriver. Disconnect any microphone wire. Behind the plug is the other cluster mounting screw. d. Using a Torx drive, T-20, remove both cluster-mounting screws. e. Have a towel, or other soft cloth, available to protect the dashboard from the clips that locate the instrument cluster on the dashboard. Remove the instrument cluster by lifting it straight up. f. To remove the three plugs, use a small common screwdriver to push down the locking tab and lift the locking lever up. It is easier to get access to the back of the instrument cluster if the steering wheel is pulled all the way out. g. Remove the hazard-warning switch plug by moving the locking tab sideways toward the center of the car and pulling the plug down and out of the cluster assembly. h. Move the instrument cluster to a safe place. i. This information can be watched on 9X6 Werks, Vol. II. 11. Finish the installation of the new wire. a. Take a three foot length of wire and feed it down through the hole on top of the dashboard, trying to get it down into the area behind the CD holder/cubbyhole. This is entirely a trial and error proposition. When you do get the wire fed down behind the CD holder/cubbyhole, tape the two ends of the wires together and pull the new wire up through the hole on top of the dashboard. b. Cut the new wire to a length that will allow it to comfortably reach the blue plug. Strip ¾ inch of insulation off the new wire. Slip a length of heat shrink over the new wire. Twist the end of the new wire and the previously cut and stripped wire pin together. Solder the wires together. Move the heat shrink to cover the solder connection. Using a match (or electric heat shrink gun) carefully warm the heat shrink material until it is tight around the connection. c. Using the ohmmeter, check that the new wire is not grounded. Attach one ohmmeter lead to the wire pin and the other ohmmeter lead to the metal structure of the dashboard. The ohmmeter should read infinite resistance. If it doesn’t, you likely have pinched the new wire on one of the shifter assembly fasteners. Don’t go any further until the shorted wire problem has been addressed. d. Open the bottom of the blue plug by squeezing the base of the plug so that the locking hooks allow the flap to be opened. e. Using a small common screwdriver, pry the lock on the side of the blue plug, allowing the assembly to be slid apart. f. The black core of the blue plug has pinholes numbered 1 through 16 on one side and 17 through 32 on the other side. The wire pin on the new wire is inserted in hole number 5. There are pins already installed holes 1 through 4 and 10 through 13. Hole number 5, in the photograph, is fifth from the left. When inserting the wire pin, orient it so the locking clip holds it in place. g. Reassemble the blue plug making sure that the blue shell locks onto the black core. Close the flap on the bottom of the plug. (The photograph below was taken before the new wire was installed in the black core. The new wire should be included in the bundle of wires when the flap is closed.) h. Use one or two tie wraps to secure the new wire to the existing wire bundle. i. At this time you can temporarily connect the Carrera instrument cluster to the three colored plugs. Make sure they are firmly and squarely connected and that the locking levers are snapped into place. Temporarily reconnect the battery and start the engine. Everything should operate correctly…..all the whistles and bells. The voltmeter and oil pressure gage should operate. The voltmeter measures the instrument cluster internal voltage and should read about 12 volts with the ignition switch turned on and the engine static. With the engine running, the voltmeter should read about 13.8 to 14.0 volts. If the voltmeter doesn’t read properly, check that the green plug is properly and securely locked into its receptacle. If it still doesn’t read the proper voltage, there may be a problem with the Carrera instrument cluster. The oil pressure gage should read about 4 to 5 bar (cool to cold oil temperature) when the engine is initially started. If the oil pressure gage doesn’t read properly, having done step “c” above, check that the new wire is connected securely to the oil pressure sensor on terminal “G”. If the connection is OK, check the continuity of the new wire, and your connections, by using the ohmmeter. Using some of the extra wire, you can connect the leads of the ohmmeter to either end of the new wire and check to see that there is zero resistance. If the continuity of the new wire is OK, you probably have a problem with the Carrera instrument cluster. The low oil pressure “idiot light” should not be illuminated. If it is, you will receive an OBC warning as well. Check that the original green/white wire is connected securely to the oil pressure sensor on terminal “WK”. If you have a car with the MOST bus, the radio will display “Porsche Protected” when turned on. In a non-MOST bus car, the radio will play if you enter the proper security code. j. At the end of the trial run, shut down the engine, disconnect the battery and unplug the three colored instrument cluster connections. 12. Assemble Carrera instrument cluster and Boxster instrument cover a. Remove the two mounting screws holding the Boxster cluster in the instrument cover assembly. They are the fasteners at the extreme ends of the cluster. Torx driver T-20. b. Separate the instrument cluster from the instrument cover assembly. c. Fit the Carrera instrument cluster to the instrument cover assembly and, from behind, mark the area that needs to be removed to enable the voltmeter and oil pressure gage to project out from the fascia. d. Using the Dremel tool and sanding drum, grind the plastic material away. As you get close to the line delineating the area to be removed, frequently trial fit the cluster to the instrument cover. 120 grit sanding bands will remove material frighteningly quickly. As you get closer to the final fit, a finer grit will give a smoother finish and more control over the final contour. e. Assemble the Carrera instrument cluster and the Boxster instrument cover using the two screws. Torx driver T-20. 13. Reinstall the instrument cluster a. With a towel or other soft cloth to protect the dashboard, lay the Carrera instrument cluster on top of the dashboard. b. Reinstall the hazard-switch plug. It slides up in groves behind the hole and is held in position by a locking tab. c. Reconnect the three colored plugs. Make sure they are firmly and squarely connected and that the locking levers are snapped into place. d. Remove the cloth protecting the dashboard and place the instrument cluster in position and firmly push down on it to snap it into place on the dashboard. e. At this point, with all the wires and plugs in place, you may want to do a final electrical check of the installation. Reconnect the battery and check that the instrument cluster operates properly. Disconnect the battery. f. Reinstall the two T-20 screws that secure the instrument cluster to the dashboard. Be careful replacing the left screw. If it falls before you can get it threaded, it will drop into the bowels of the dashboard. g. Reinstall the hazard-warning switch. It only fits into the plug one way. But, of course, anything can be forced. The switch should fit smoothly and click into place. h. Reinstall the hazard-warning button. It also clicks into place and should function properly when pushed on and off. i. Reinstall the trim plug/hand-free microphone. Reconnect the wire to the microphone, if installed. j. Reconnect the battery and tighten negative cable securely with 10mm socket wrench. Replace battery cover. k. This information can be watched on 9X6 Werks, Vol. II. 14. Reassemble the center console a. Check that the 10mm nuts that secure the shifter assembly are tight. b. Reinstall the shifter base cover. c. Clip the window wire bundle on the shifter base cover. d. If installed, plug the alarm system wire into the oddment tray latch connector. e. Carefully reinstall the center console. It may have to be manipulated somewhat around the parking brake lever and between the seat backs. Starting the replacement with the front of the console into position first is easiest. Route the wire bundles for the window operating switches, heated seat control switches (if installed) and ashtray (if used) through the hole for the control panel. f. Reinstall the 4 screws that fasten the center console, Torx driver T-20. They have coarse threads. A fifth screw, that holds the plastic floor of the oddment tray in place, has fine threads. One screw goes in at the forward end of the center console. One screw goes in the opening for the control panel. Two screws go in the oddment tray area; one under the coin holder and the other on the right forward side of oddment tray area. g. Reinstall the plastic floor of the oddment tray and fasten with the fine threaded screw, Torx driver T-20. h. Reinstall the rubber mat in the oddment tray. i. Reinstall the coin holder on the left front corner of the oddment tray. Push down and the coin holder snaps into place. j. Reinstall the light for the ashtray (if used). k. Plug in the connectors for the window operating switches and the seat heat control switches (if installed). The white plugs go to the driver’s and the black plugs go to the passenger’s side. l. Reinstall the control panel securing it with two black plastic bushings and two black trim screws, Torx driver T-30. Make sure the bushings are fully seated before gently tightening the trim screws. m. Reinstall the ashtray (if used) or the rubber mat for the non-smoker’s tray. n. Reinstall parking brake cover next to driver’s side seat belt fastener. Position the two tabs on the top of the cover into the holes on the center console and push straight on. o. Reinstall the cubbyhole and CD holder (tape holder). Reinstall the lower of the two first. They both just snap in. p. Reinstall the lower center console cover (batwing). It snaps into place. q. Reinstall the left and right upper side covers to the center console. They snap into place. r. Reinstall the shift knob. It pushes straight down. Some cars might have a 5mm hex screw that needs to be tightened, 5mm hex key. s. Snap the frame that holds the leather shift boot into place. Push straight down until it snaps into place. t. This information and photographs can be found at bmracing.com by downloading the B & M short shifter installation manual. And, it can be watched on 9X6 Werks, Vol. III. 15. Reinstall forward engine compartment lid. There are seven 10mm bolts and two 10mm nuts 16. Reinstall the upholstery panel on the back wall of the passenger compartment. There are four large diameter black plastic fasteners used at the top of the panel to hold it in place. 17. Close engine compartment using the procedures set forth in the owner’s manual (MY03, Page 182). 18. Re-code the Carrera instrument cluster/CDR23 combination using a PIWIS. The PIWIS used had software version 17.02. I don’t have a PIWIS operators manual and the technician who did the re-coding couldn’t remember the exact sequence…..but the routine starts something like this: a. “Special Function” b. “Sports Car Hand Over” c. F-12 d. F-12 e. F-8 “Start Function f. “Control Unit Search” From there, the technician said, the PIWIS started looking at each device in the car. The technician said that he made no inputs to the PIWIS concerning the Carrera instrument cluster or the radio. After the PIWIS ran through its program, the radio worked. As a wise man once said, “You can’t beat success”. The “Sports Car Hand Over” routine is the run on all Porsches to wake them up after being shipped to the dealers. FINAL THOUGHTS Except for the time it takes to modify the Boxster instrument cover, this is a two-hour project. Almost all of the effort is in opening up the car and then closing it at the end. I found I had two problems after the installation was complete. Fortunately, I had seen the instrument cluster in operation in the donor Carrera the day that I bought it. And later, I temporarily installed it in another Carrera to verify that it still worked and hadn’t been damaged in shipping back and forth to the instrument shop. I knew the problems were not associated with the Carrera instrument cluster. The first problem was that the oil pressure gage didn’t work. (The idiot light was OK.) After a lot of head scratching and part swapping, I found that I had pinched the new wire in TWO places under the shifter assembly. Rather than remove the entire length of new wire, I spliced in a new section to run under the shifter assembly. The importance of checking the continuity of the new wire after it is completely installed can’t be overstated. It’s an easily avoided problem if you pay attention to how you route the new wire under the shifter assembly. The second problem was that the voltmeter didn’t work. (I was batting 0 for 2!) After a lot of head scratching and part swapping, Loren pointed out that there might be something wrong in the area of the green connector. I unplugged the green connector and carefully reconnected it, making sure that the plug was fully seated before I closed the locking lever. That did the trick. For owners of Boxsters with the original instrument cluster, i.e., MY97 - MY00, with blue, white and black plugs, these are the pin positions: 1. Oil Pressure "idiot light" - white 6 (green / white wire [original]). 2. Oil Pressure Sensor (gage) - blue 9 [new wire]. Before you install the Carrera instrument cluster check to make sure there is a light bulb in the position for the "Convertable top indicator light". It is a 1.3 watt bulb, Part Number - 999.631.302.90.

 

Edited by whall

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Wow, THANKS. :clapping: I'm jealous. I even like the black faces on the gauges. Maybe some day I'll get up the courage to do this.

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Glad it finally worked out. 996 non- MOST cluster retrofit on a MOST Boxster and the 996 cluster even has the dot matrix display. The only person I know that did this is bluboy 911 but he removed the oil pressure and volt meter gauges - so minus 1 point. http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...p;hl=radio+code

What I call the old style cluster was used on the Boxster from 1997-2000, and on the 996 from 1998 (1999 in the US)-2001. The new style was used on the Boxster from 2001-2004, and on the 996 from 2002-2004. The old and new style do not interchange.

Other things to consider. A tiptronic cluster has gear position indicator lights that the manual transmission does not have. The first year for the dot matrix cluster was the first year of the turbo - 2001 - but you do not want to use a turbo cluster. The first year for the dot matrix cluster on the Boxster was 2002 and I think the same year for the 996. You got the dot matrix cluster if you have factory OBC.

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Excellent writeup, whall. It's always good to hear not only how to do it but what might go wrong.

One question: how much did you pay for the instrument cluster mileage reset? I have seen some pretty high prices out there.

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Excellent writeup, whall. It's always good to hear not only how to do it but what might go wrong.

One question: how much did you pay for the instrument cluster mileage reset? I have seen some pretty high prices out there.

Palo Alto Speedometer did the mileage change. They charged $150.00 and did a great, two day turn around. And, paspeedo.com was very responsive to my e-mails. I have seen some of the recycling yards asking up to $400.00! Unfortunately, the shipping was almost as expensive as the service: $60.00 each way. I insured the instrument cluster for full replacement value and the carrriers, UPS out, FedEx back, required second day delivery......I suppose to limit the exposure to the twenty foot drop test some boxes get.

Here is a look at the cost of the project: :eek:

1. Carrera instrument cluster: $350.00

2. Carrera oil pressure sensor: $ 43.17

3. VW Wire Pin: $ 3.56

4. Mileage reset: $150.00

5. Shipping: $120.00

6. Radio Shack purchases: $ 7.00

7. Porsche dealer assistance: $122.00

Cheers,

Bill

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Glad it finally worked out. 996 non-MOST cluster retrofit on a MOST Boxster and the 996 cluster even has the dot matrix display. The only person I know that did this is bluboy 911 but he removed the oil pressure and volt meter gauges - so minus 1 point. http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...p;hl=radio+code

What I call the old style cluster was used on the Boxster from 1997-2000, and on the 996 from 1998 (1999 in the US)-2001. The new style was used on the Boxster from 2001-2004, and on the 996 from 2002-2004. The old and new style do not interchange.

Other things to consider. A tiptronic cluster has gear position indicator lights that the manual transmission does not have. The first year for the dot matrix cluster was the first year of the turbo - 2001 - but you do not want to use a turbo cluster. The first year for the dot matrix cluster on the Boxster was 2002 and I think the same year for the 996. You got the dot matrix cluster if you have factory OBC.

Ok, the swap actually looks pretty straightforward. I have a 2001 Boxster with Tiptronic. So from what I gather, I would need a 996 tiptronic cluster from a 2002 and newer C2? Any idea what the part number would be?

Thanks,

Jeff

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Glad it finally worked out. 996 non-MOST cluster retrofit on a MOST Boxster and the 996 cluster even has the dot matrix display. The only person I know that did this is bluboy 911 but he removed the oil pressure and volt meter gauges - so minus 1 point. http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...p;hl=radio+code

What I call the old style cluster was used on the Boxster from 1997-2000, and on the 996 from 1998 (1999 in the US)-2001. The new style was used on the Boxster from 2001-2004, and on the 996 from 2002-2004. The old and new style do not interchange.

Other things to consider. A tiptronic cluster has gear position indicator lights that the manual transmission does not have. The first year for the dot matrix cluster was the first year of the turbo - 2001 - but you do not want to use a turbo cluster. The first year for the dot matrix cluster on the Boxster was 2002 and I think the same year for the 996. You got the dot matrix cluster if you have factory OBC.

Ok, the swap actually looks pretty straightforward. I have a 2001 Boxster with Tiptronic. So from what I gather, I would need a 996 tiptronic cluster from a 2002 and newer C2? Any idea what the part number would be?

Thanks,

Jeff

Jeff,

You might try looking at this parts catalog:

https://techinfo.porsche.com/techinfo/pdf/e...996_KATALOG.pdf

"Main Group 9", "Chapter 906".

I found these three which look like possible candidates for your car:

996.641.981.76.70C (MY02-, Option M 249, black face, page 552)

996.641.981.26.XXX (MY02-, Option M 249, faces to match interior colors, page 551)

996.641.226.03.70C (MY02-, Option M 249, black face, page 548)

Option M 249 is the Tiptronic transmission.

I hope this helps. You may want to double check with a dealer or after market supplier to make sure. Measure twice, cut once. :D

Cheers,

Bill

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There are a few candidates on ebay, starting at $99.99. But you would need to verify the application and condition.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/PORSCHE-CLU...sspagenameZWDVW

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/PORSCHE-INS...sspagenameZWDVW

I'm actually watching both of those auctions, but the $99 auction states that they don't know the application and the clock set stem is missing. But the price is right. The other auction I'm having trouble tracking down the part number in the parts catalog I have. I am calling the seller tomorrow to discuss this cluster. He also has a grey faced cluster, but he tells me that some numbskull removed the part number tag on the back.

996 Grey Cluster

He does state that he can check the mileage for additional $45. Not sure how he does that without talking to him first.

This search may be difficult without actually knowing what vehicle the cluster actually came out of.

Edited by Thumper

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The knob shafts on the new style cluster are plastic and they break off if you hit the knob hard enough. Porsche does not sell the shaft. If that cluster checks out then you would have to take the shaft out of your cluster.

If you plug the cluster into the correct year car the mileage on the cluster will be displayed. I guess the $45 deal is to send it to a speedometer shop to check the mileage, but why if your are going to have it changed.

Watch out for used clusters on ebay. There are defective ones out there. Some were warranty replacements that were supposed to be destroyed, but they show up on ebay. Whall was smart and saw the cluster in action before he bought it.

If you talk to the seller in Pamona let me know his name. There is a guy in Southern California that was selling good used parts, but I forget his name. If it is the same guy some of the local owners bought parts from him and the parts were good.

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The knob shafts on the new style cluster are plastic and they break off if you hit the knob hard enough. Porsche does not sell the shaft. If that cluster checks out then you would have to take the shaft out of your cluster.

If you plug the cluster into the correct year car the mileage on the cluster will be displayed. I guess the $45 deal is to send it to a speedometer shop to check the mileage, but why if your are going to have it changed.

Watch out for used clusters on ebay. There are defective ones out there. Some were warranty replacements that were supposed to be destroyed, but they show up on ebay. Whall was smart and saw the cluster in action before he bought it.

If you talk to the seller in Pamona let me know his name. There is a guy in Southern California that was selling good used parts, but I forget his name. If it is the same guy some of the local owners bought parts from him and the parts were good.

The guy in Pomona is Ray Robles. He says that he's sold quite a few clusters and that he gets them from a couple of local dealerships when they swap them out due to broken knob shafts. He tells me that he replaces the shaft and then resells them on eBay. He also said that he's never had one returned for being defective. He took the grey faced cluster in to the dealership that he deals with the most and verified that it's from a C2. I'm not sure how they checked it, but he seemed like a good guy over the phone, so we'll see how it all works out. I have a local speedo shop that's going to reset the mileage and I'll have them check functionality. If the speedo shop can't test everything, I'll take it over to the guys at RUF and see if they can check it out. I got it for a decent price, so worst case I have a relatively inexpensive shelf ornament.

Now I need to find an extra cluster surround to trim (I like having extras in case I get over zealous with my dremel).

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Ray Robles is the name I could not remember. One of our local guys (Raman) bought a use Boxster S cluster for the silver gauges to put in a base Boxster. I tested that cluster before it was put in and it worked. Another local guy (Henry) bought some interior parts and had no problems. This was a few years ago. I had also contacted Ray back then when I was trying to do my 996 cluster swap, for the 996 surround and dash cap.

Hope it works. Ask Ray to keep an eye out for a 1999-2001 cluster with manual transmission for me.

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Ray Robles is the name I could not remember. One of our local guys (Raman) bought a use Boxster S cluster for the silver gauges to put in a base Boxster. I tested that cluster before it was put in and it worked. Another local guy (Henry) bought some interior parts and had no problems. This was a few years ago. I had also contacted Ray back then when I was trying to do my 996 cluster swap, for the 996 surround and dash cap.

Hope it works. Ask Ray to keep an eye out for a 1999-2001 cluster with manual transmission for me.

I'll be more than happy to pass that on.

Anyone have a black 996 cluster surround laying around?

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996 surround does not work with a Boxster instrument cluster cover.

I was thinking of the entire cluster cover and surround from a 996.

Like this only in Black

1z1ejav.jpg

Ray says that he will have more clusters next month.

Edited by Thumper

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That is the way I wanted to do it. But I have Boxster red leather. And I could not find a 996 surround and cover in Boxster red that would not have cost an arm and leg. Loren has a 996 with Boxster red interior but he would not let me near his car. Black will be easier to find.

So I decided to cut my surround to fit the 996 cluster. In the picture I have the 996 cluster face next to my Boxster surround/cover to figure out where to cut. There are actally lines that you can follow. But then I thought maybe I should first make sure the 996 ebay cluster worked, and that is when I found out the middle LCD display was defective. End of project.

If you look at Whall's pictures I can tell that he cut his Boxster surround.

post-4-1173515798_thumb.jpg

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That is the way I wanted to do it. But I have Boxster red leather. And I could not find a 996 surround and cover in Boxster red that would not have cost an arm and leg. Loren has a 996 with Boxster red interior but he would not let me near his car. Black will be easier to find.

So I decided to cut my surround to fit the 996 cluster. In the picture I have the 996 cluster face next to my Boxster surround/cover to figure out where to cut. There are actally lines that you can follow. But then I thought maybe I should first make sure the 996 ebay cluster worked, and that is when I found out the middle LCD display was defective. End of project.

If you look at Whall's pictures I can tell that he cut his Boxster surround.

I found another guy who has done this swap and he trimmed his Boxster surround and then found out that the aluminum gauge rings would not fit on the gauges with the trimmed Boxster surround, so he changed his out for the 996 surround. I was really wanting to put the gauge rings on my new cluster, but the only used 996 surrounds that I've found were $475 and $500 respectively. Ouch! Before I commit the additional funds, I think I'll wait until my cluster arrives and make sure it's not defective.

Will the 996 cluster have the OBC activated? Or is that an option on the 996's the same as it is on the 986's?

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That is the way I wanted to do it. But I have Boxster red leather. And I could not find a 996 surround and cover in Boxster red that would not have cost an arm and leg. Loren has a 996 with Boxster red interior but he would not let me near his car. Black will be easier to find.

So I decided to cut my surround to fit the 996 cluster. In the picture I have the 996 cluster face next to my Boxster surround/cover to figure out where to cut. There are actally lines that you can follow. But then I thought maybe I should first make sure the 996 ebay cluster worked, and that is when I found out the middle LCD display was defective. End of project.

If you look at Whall's pictures I can tell that he cut his Boxster surround.

I found another guy who has done this swap and he trimmed his Boxster surround and then found out that the aluminum gauge rings would not fit on the gauges with the trimmed Boxster surround, so he changed his out for the 996 surround. I was really wanting to put the gauge rings on my new cluster, but the only used 996 surrounds that I've found were $475 and $500 respectively. Ouch! Before I commit the additional funds, I think I'll wait until my cluster arrives and make sure it's not defective.

Will the 996 cluster have the OBC activated? Or is that an option on the 996's the same as it is on the 986's?

Using the RennTech price search function, I found the price for a new, black leatherette 996 surround to be $450; Part Number 996.552.059.02 EUD. The $475-500 used surrounds must be leather.

Your 996 instrument cluster, being an MY02-, most likely has the OBC enabled. I think only the earlier cars had the OBC as an option.

Cheers,

Bill

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I would suggest that you not spend any more time or money on trim parts until you can get that 996 cluster working on your Boxster.

You are going from a 2001 Boxster to a 2002 996 cluster with unknown specifications. I do not know anyone who has updated like this.

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I would suggest that you not spend any more time or money on trim parts until you can get that 996 cluster working on your Boxster.

That's my plan.

You are going from a 2001 Boxster to a 2002 996 cluster with unknown specifications. I do not know anyone who has updated like this.

Not real confidence inspiring....I guess we'll find out if it works pretty soon. I'm under the assumption that since my Boxster is an '01, it has the updated cluster so I must use an updated cluster from a 996, i.e.; 2002+

If my thinking is flawed, please let me know.

Edited by Thumper

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So I decided to cut my surround to fit the 996 cluster. In the picture I have the 996 cluster face next to my Boxster surround/cover to figure out where to cut. There are actually lines that you can follow.

Hi TP, I've got a working Carrera cluster and the oil pressure sensor. Can you just confirm the 996 surround doesn't fit into the Boxster cover? I thought they were identical, but the Carrera cover just had a couple of extra cut-outs. Can you remember how they differ apart from this?

You say there are a couple of lines you can follow on the Boxster surround. I don't suppose you have any pics of these? I realise I could just dismantle mine but I'd rather have all the parts at hand before I start, and that might include a ready cut replacment surround (haven't looked at second hand dealers yet but Essential Styling have a silver coloured one for £160+VAT if it all goes wrong...)

http://www.essentialstyling.com/instrument%20housing.jpg

I assume this is the part that needs to be cut/altered.

Edited by Paul Fraser

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This picture is the rear of my Boxster dash cap/surround and the face off the 996 cluster. The face of a 996 cluster is wider than a Boxster due to the 2 additional gauges, so you need to cut/trim the Boxster surround.

I have put yellow marks on the area that you need to cut away, but just on one side of the Boxster surround. Of course you also need to cut away the other side. This picture is from the rear so you will not see what I am talking about until you remove the unit from your car and then remove the cluster.

Once you have your dash out and the cluster removed you will see the lines/ridges that you cut to, so that the 996 cluster will fit. The plasic is thin.

The picture in the link is the Boxster surround that you will need to cut.

post-4-1175738645_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for that TP, the picture is very helpful. I had reservations about cutting the Boxster surround for fear of making a mess of it but from your picture it seems that it might be easier than I had thought it would be. I'll have a look at this in the next week or so.

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I"m doing this project myself as well, 02 996 C2 cluster going into 02 Boxster S. I, too, was hoping to find the 996 surround, but I have been unable so I guess its going to be dremel time.

Patrick

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