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I have a MY00 C2 that is having the engine replaced at 59,XXX miles. Any thoughts on how a new engine affects resale? Will this be a plus (i.e., new engine under warranty = good deal) or a minus (car needed new engine = stay away)?

If it adds any value, any guestimate how much it helps?

Thanks,

Tom

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Ask yourself that question. If you were about to plunk down $35k+ on a used car, would you want to find one that has experienced no problems? Or would you rather go for one that's already had the problems and was fixed for them?

Whenever I buy a used car, I tend to stay away from any cars that's received any type of body work, major mechanical work, or even lots of repair work over time (and I would know this because I won't buy a car without records).

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I would say the masq is right in what he says in general. However, if the records are available and the body is unrepaired and sound, I'd say it would be a plus.

The history of RMS and intermediate shaft failures makes a new warranted engine a good insurance policy. And Porsche would rather replace that rebuild, so that a new engine is not an uncommon event.

No idea how to quantify the value either way.

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  • 8 months later...

There probably isn't a simple answer as some people would see it as a good thing, others would tend to shy away.

This is a common issue in airplanes & boats where engines are replaced more frequently. In those areas, a new engine adds a little value, but not as much as you might think. An engine in poor condition depresses the value more than a new engine increases it. Doesn't seem fair. But the assumption is that a vehicle is expected to have a good, functioning engine. So, having a new engine adds some value, but there are other things that go wrong with age and a new(er) engine often doesn't add significant performance over a well-functioning, original engine. So, you don't get a big value bump from a new engine.

If you are going to sell it, add a modest increase for the new engine, and see how people respond.

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When the engine on my RX-7 was replaced by insurance the net effect was that buyers were 'happy about it' but willing to pay no more then car would have been worth based on it's overall condition and mileage...

I think that it is pychological, some people will look at it positively but others will wonder why it needed to be replaced so soon and worry that it could happen again while they own the car.

Edited by Westcoaster
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There probably isn't a simple answer as some people would see it as a good thing, others would tend to shy away.

This is a common issue in airplanes & boats where engines are replaced more frequently. In those areas, a new engine adds a little value, but not as much as you might think. An engine in poor condition depresses the value more than a new engine increases it. Doesn't seem fair. But the assumption is that a vehicle is expected to have a good, functioning engine. So, having a new engine adds some value, but there are other things that go wrong with age and a new(er) engine often doesn't add significant performance over a well-functioning, original engine. So, you don't get a big value bump from a new engine.

If you are going to sell it, add a modest increase for the new engine, and see how people respond.

Agree as well. I think it would pull a bigger resale value, but nowhere close to the price of the new engine. Of course if was done under CPO, better for you. I had a Ford Expedition that the engine blew up with 55k miles with all required maintenance done. Ford would not pay a dime. It cost me $5,500 to replace and I probably didn't get anything extra because of the perception of a lemon. At least with the P car this is a known issue and someone might like having the piece of mind of the new engine. Best of luck.

Will

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I have a MY00 C2 that is having the engine replaced at 59,XXX miles. Any thoughts on how a new engine affects resale? Will this be a plus (i.e., new engine under warranty = good deal) or a minus (car needed new engine = stay away)?

If it adds any value, any guestimate how much it helps?

Thanks,

Tom

From the tension among answers here I would have to say that one would have to take into consideration the known failures and where they stem from. Unless a total moron(10k rpm), you can ride a 911 hard and put it away wet without blowing the engine. If the buyer understands that there were specific failures to specific years, and that has already been addressed and replaced with an updated motor that should give them reassurance. If not then there is nothing you can do. Some people are bitterly anal, it is a self defense mechanism that for the most part serves them well, others just worry about getting scammed/buying a lemon/that people are generally untrustworthy(me). But if they are truely wanting to spend the money to buy a 911 then one would hope that they would take a little time to about them. Unless they like dropping $20k-$120k on a whim(if so might I interest them in a few shares of Enron?).

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There probably isn't a simple answer as some people would see it as a good thing, others would tend to shy away.

This is a common issue in airplanes & boats where engines are replaced more frequently. In those areas, a new engine adds a little value, but not as much as you might think. An engine in poor condition depresses the value more than a new engine increases it. Doesn't seem fair. But the assumption is that a vehicle is expected to have a good, functioning engine. So, having a new engine adds some value, but there are other things that go wrong with age and a new(er) engine often doesn't add significant performance over a well-functioning, original engine. So, you don't get a big value bump from a new engine.

If you are going to sell it, add a modest increase for the new engine, and see how people respond.

Just keep in mind that with aircraft we have TBO, "time between overhaul", which is regulatory. This in turn is basically pro-rated in the Aircraft Blue Books for hours remaining before TBO. No where does any auto manufacturer specify a milage that the engine should make it to so by default they don't say where they can fail. And Big Brother isn't regulating every aspect of its operation and maintenance schedule, nor is every driver out there under the scrutiny of the FAA and the flying community.

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  • 2 months later...
Anyone know what is the warranty on a rebuild M96 engine? My 01 C2 had the engine replaced by Porsche under warranty at 70K in Jan/07 during previous ownership. I now have 92K and wonder if I still have some warranty left on the engine.

I had new engine on my '99. I was told by Porsche dealer that the warranty on rebuilt engine from Porsche is 2 years with unlimitted miles.

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Being the owner of a '99 Boxster going on 7 years and a '99 Carrera going on 6 years, I wouldn't hesitate to buy another '99 in very good condition in the future. I would however, knowing what I know, buy one that had a replacement motor installed as recently as possible. It would give me peace of mind knowing the slipping/cracked sleeve issue, weak intermediate shaft/bearing problem, RMS issues, Oil separator issue, are all addressed. Also nice knowing I would have a newer ps pump, starter, coils, alternator, motor electronics, plus all internals with the old lighter body and chassis, limited slip diff, mechanical throttle and other pluses for the '99 model year.

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Being the owner of a '99 Boxster going on 7 years and a '99 Carrera going on 6 years, I wouldn't hesitate to buy another '99 in very good condition in the future. I would however, knowing what I know, buy one that had a replacement motor installed as recently as possible. It would give me peace of mind knowing the slipping/cracked sleeve issue, weak intermediate shaft/bearing problem, RMS issues, Oil separator issue, are all addressed. Also nice knowing I would have a newer ps pump, starter, coils, alternator, motor electronics, plus all internals with the old lighter body and chassis, limited slip diff, mechanical throttle and other pluses for the '99 model year.

mk2 chassis > mk1 chassis

a reman engine replaced under warranty is a plus

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