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JFP in PA

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Community Answers

  1. JFP in PA's post in Flywheel Bolt Torque was marked as the answer   
    Yes, but always use new bolts only.
  2. JFP in PA's post in Brake fluid reservoir draining. was marked as the answer   
    Why even bother?  We flush these systems almost daily, and we do not siphon off the reservoir first, the way the Motive system works it simply is not necessary, and more paint jobs have probably been ruined while doing this than anything else.
  3. JFP in PA's post in Temperature Gauge Failure was marked as the answer   
    If you do that, you will also lose any data that could have helped you permanently correct the problem.  Bad idea.
  4. JFP in PA's post in Car sits uneven after rear strut replacement was marked as the answer   
    Even though you marked the eccentrics and/or other fasteners, you should not torque them to their final settings until the car's weight is sitting on the suspension, otherwise you are "pre-loading" the suspension in a non running configuration.  You can do this with the car sitting on its tires, or by setting it down on a jack stand as close to the wheel carrier as possible, and then applying final torque.
  5. JFP in PA's post in Cam adjuster seal installation tips? was marked as the answer   
    The seal tool we use matches the outer diameter of the seal.
  6. JFP in PA's post in Rebuilding calipers was marked as the answer   
    Leave the fluid level in the reservoir alone.
     
    Leave the brake pedal alone.
     
    As mentioned, you need to disconnect the flex line at the hard line connection and then cap the hard line to prevent the system gravity draining and getting air into the control network,
     
    We replace the vibration dampeners on pad kits that do not come with new ones, we use a dab of silicone brake grease to hold them and reduce the potential for noise.
     
    Yes, used a quality brake grease on the lube points noted in the service manual.
     
    You can try to sand your rotors, but I would check them for correct thickness and replace if needed.  Noise problems with the brakes on these cars tend to be with the pads rather than the rotors.
     
    Any air that gets in while servicing the calipers will come out during a system bleed once the car is assembled.  We use only pressure bleeding, using one of Motives units, which both speeds up the process and makes it a one man proposition.
  7. JFP in PA's post in Weekend projects for a rainy weekend was marked as the answer   
    Couple of suggestions:  We have an excellent archive of "how to's" on just about every subject (DIY Tutorials tab at the top of the page), so "search" is your friend.   This topic can be found here: http://www.renntech.org/forums/tutorials/article/56-cabrio-top-hydraulic-fluid-step-by-step/
     
    And yes, the syringe/siphon method on the steering fluid is fine.
     
    Considering the potential amount we may have saved you on projects already, now might also be a good time to become a contributing member.......
  8. JFP in PA's post in Hello & ...help? was marked as the answer   
    Question all you want, but some of us do this for a living.  The brake fluid still flows through the ABS/PSM systems even when they are not activated by the computer; this procedure was developed to remove any air trapped within the system control network after it has been opened for parts replacement.
     
    To do this with the Durametric system, you need to first go to the PSM section menu:
     

     
     There are 5 activations related to the ABS system:
    Start/Stop ABS Pump Start/Stop Brake Bleeding Left Rear Start/Stop Brake Bleeding Right Rear Start/Stop Brake Bleeding Left Front Start/Stop Brake Bleeding Right Front You activate the pump, then each wheel one at a time, flushing that segment.  On many cars, the system will only run for a second or two while that segment is flushed and then shuts itself off.  This is normal.
     
    In all the years we have been doing this, I have never seen brake fluid "gel" in the ABS/PSM systems; by far, the bigger threat is corrosion from moisture in the fluid.
  9. JFP in PA's post in Two cautions after DE inspection? was marked as the answer   
    There are two "drains" on the cooling system, one is an actual plug (photo below) and the other is a "weep hole" which is beneath the water pump pulley itself.  If a "crust" develops from leakge at the weep hole drain (second photo), the seal and bearing in the water pump are failing and need to be replaced.
     
     
  10. JFP in PA's post in Replacement VIN plate near battery was marked as the answer   
    I don't think you misunderstood my response, I am not referring to getting a new VIN number, but rather a replacement VIN tag or plate for the car.  This is much more than just getting someone to do a re-pop of the original tag.  I many states, it difficult, or even illegal to replace any VIN tag on a car without the state DMV approval.  When state police or DMV officers show up at car auctions, one of the first thing they look at is the VIN tags and how they are mounted.  If it appears to be a replacement, tampered with, or is missing, the car cannot be sold until the owner proves the car's provenance to the police and DMV; and in some cases the police will impound the vehicle until they are satisfied the car is legitimate.
     
    You need to contact your state's department of motor vehicles and get clarification on if and how you can do this.  In the state where I live, the state has to issue an approved replacement plate once the title for the car is clarified, anyone trying to do this in the marketplace is subject to arrest; only the state can issue the plate.  And cars with state reissued VIN tags have that fact noted in their owner's title, which stays with the car forever.
     
    This is not just a simple replacement, which is why I mentioned that you may also have recourse against whoever sold you the car.
  11. JFP in PA's post in Coolant Temperature Light Flashing after Tire Blowout was marked as the answer   
    A. Yes.
     
    B. Yes.
     
    The engine compartment fan assembly is in the engine bay, adjacent to the vent on the passenger's (U.S. model) side.  If you have access to the Durametric software, you can ask it to turn the fan on without the car running, and you should hear it.
  12. JFP in PA's post in Brake fluid was marked as the answer   
    Soap and water will do it, and I would do this quickly as brake fluid is Hell on paint.
  13. JFP in PA's post in P0348 Replacement camshaft sensor question was marked as the answer   
    I'm sure Bosch knows what they are doing, but I have not seen one configured like that.  The sensor itself is a simple Hall effect style, and some other makes use all plastic housed units.  I'd give it a try and see what happens.
  14. JFP in PA's post in Durametric / Tech help please. was marked as the answer   
    Rest easy my friend, the spec limits for the cam deviation values are +/- 6.0 degrees.  It is normal for the values to bounce around a bit, they are subject to engine, and in particular, oil temperatures.
     
    I am not familiar with the other two codes, and the only reference to the 9150 has to do with the spoiler deployment relay and fuse (D7), so perhaps someone can chime in here......
     
    Just out of curiosity, does the car have any LED bulbs in the tail lights?
  15. JFP in PA's post in Is this Erratic behavior what happens when a battery gives up the ghos was marked as the answer   
    A new battery usually clears up these types of issues as they are caused by low voltage.
  16. JFP in PA's post in Smokey When Starting was marked as the answer   
    Check the car's AOS system.  Easiest way is to try to remove the oil fill cap in the rear boot while the engine idles; if it comes off reasonably easy, you are fine.  But if it is a bear to get off, the AOS needs to be replaced.
  17. JFP in PA's post in Braided brake lines was marked as the answer   
    We like them and use them extensively. For a street car, you want DOT approved units; our preference is for Goodridge:

    DOT approved, great warranty if you ever damage one, retails in $120-130 range but do go on sale from time to time.
  18. JFP in PA's post in Battery Question was marked as the answer   
    You should only be replacing the battery when it is needed, which can be quickly determined by a simple "go/no go" load test that takes less than a min. to run. Most auto parts stores do this for free, and just about any decent shop should be able to do it as well.
  19. JFP in PA's post in Hose found and headlight question was marked as the answer   
    Welcome to RennTech! :welcome:
    The hose in the right-hand photo above is the vent for the battery.
    The missing part at the base of the headlight is for the headlight washer assembly (pops up when activated).
  20. JFP in PA's post in Test run without exhaust was marked as the answer   
    Running it without an exhaust system, but with the headers in place, will not harm anything other than your hearing.
    To get oil pressure, pull the fuel pump relay and crank the engine until oil pressure comes up on the dash. Plug the relay back in and you are good to go.
  21. JFP in PA's post in Locking the pulley? was marked as the answer   
    The casting boss behind the pulley that accepts the pin is designed to hold the engine at TDC while doing cam work, etc.; not to remove the pulley. If it was meant to hold the pulley while removing the center bolt, they would not have taken the time or trouble to develop and manufacture the other tool. Some people have gotten away using it to hold the pulley while taking out the bolt, but I would not recommend it.
  22. JFP in PA's post in A/C Fuse D6 on 2000 C2 Cabrio blows when A/C turned on was marked as the answer   
    The heavy amperage draw item on the circuit is the compressor clutch drive assembly, try disconnecting that and then turn the system on (the AC won't run, but everything except the clutch will be on) and see if the fuse still blows. If it doesn't you need to have the compressor clutch drive looked at.
  23. JFP in PA's post in 996 Clutch with measurements, when it is due to change? was marked as the answer   
    A lot of factors come into play on when to replace the clutch assembly. As most people do not know to compress the marcel spring between the clutch disc faces before attempting to measure the disc thickness for wear the way you were doing it in the photos, and little information is published on disc wear limits (but I will see if I can find something), disc face measurements can often be misleading. And, as strange as this may sound, we look at the pressure plate fingers and throw out bearing for signs of wear. Quite often, the fingers and/or the bearing show a lot of wear before the disc even begins to look poorly. And If you are going to replace the pressure plate because of finger wear, it makes no sense to reuse the worn disc.
    At the end of the day, a clutch kit does not cost that much, assuming the flywheel is still in good shape, and when doing an IMS you have already spend the time to get in there, so it makes sense (particularly financially if you are paying someone to do it) to reuse the clutch. Once the car is buttoned up, you really don't want to go back in to swap parts you could have replaced while it was apart.
    OK, I found some factory data on the disc face wear:

    But I would still look at the pressure plate fingers for wear, regardless of how the disc measures.
  24. JFP in PA's post in LN Engineering Retrofit Kit Instructions, rev 18 was marked as the answer   
    The instructions are ambiguous due to the same engine used in both the Boxster and 996. You want to lock Bank #1 (cylinders 1,2,3). The IMS tensioner is the same one indicated in the photo you included. A lot of people fab a second cam locking tool just to be safe, but it is not absolutely a requirement. If you completely remove the tensioners, do not mix them, they are not all the same. You should also replace the aluminum sealing ring on each tensioner released or removed to prevent future oil leaks.
  25. JFP in PA's post in Brake/Clutch fluid reservoir was marked as the answer   
    When you pressure bleed, the new fluid moves through the system like a slug, pushing all the old dirty fluid in front of it, so there is no need to drain the reservoir. That is one of the beauties of doing it that way.
    Trying to drain the reservoir can also create issues as people sometimes drip brake fluid in the process which can blister paint and create a mess that is often difficult to clean up.
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