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PTEC

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Everything posted by PTEC

  1. Doubtful. The fuel filter on your model were not designed to be serviced or replaced like the earlier 996s were. I would say a more likely culprit is your air mass sensor is on its way out.
  2. RFM is correct on this one. The ZF which was installed from 99 to 01 is readily removable from the car without removing the engine. The Mercedes Benz auto which was used from 2002 to current 997s even is another story entirely. The ZF trans bolts directly to the engine case. The MB trans uses a bell housing adapter plate between the engine and trans which makes separating the trans with the motor still in the car practically impossible. Practically. One of the problems you will run into is being able to secure the torque converter to the transmission as there is not enough room between the transmission and the body to insert the factory tool for this. So the torque converter will probably come out just enough to dump all of its ATF all over. The main problems with this are... ATF is #1 messy and #2 costly and #3 kind of a pain for a shadetree mechanic to top off correctly (you'll need a durametric at the least). Also getting to the screws which hold the transmission to the bell housing adapter is what is going to be silly. Get all of your wobble, universals and extensions ready because there is absolutely no room, even with the engine lowered. I know several technicians that have tried this once and sweared never to do it again.
  3. If I understand your post you're basically the latching hook continues to cycle when you're holding the top button to close the top right? The most common cause for this is a cracked or missing latching hook cover. If the cover is missing or damaged the latching hook will not extend far enough to close the microswitch for the latch. If it turns out this is your issue, you can buy a replacement cover from a dealer and install is as simple as putting some superglue on the new cover and slapping it on.
  4. Definitely looks to be the original vacuum setup for a factory installed sport exhaust system. The red plug going into the switch over valve is in the right spot for PSE. If the car didn't come with one from the factory, its possible one was installed afterwards. As long as there are no leaks in your vacuum system (and you would likely know if you had one because you would probably have a CEL) you should be fine.
  5. .07 is the latest version of the coils, they apply to all 03 to 06 Cayennes. Engine removal is not necessary for the valve cover job. The screws for the rear of the valve cover are the worst, you'll need to get creative to get those out.
  6. I would expect to pay about 5 hours for one rear wheel bearing. They are quite a bit more difficult as the parking brake mechanism has to be removed, which is quite a PITA. The entire wheel carrier is removed and the bearing is pressed out. If the repair is done as per the factory manual, no alignment is technically necessary as none of the eccentric bolts are touched. Also the brake lines do not need to be opened so I wouldn't pay for a brake system bleed either.
  7. There is a test port on the passenger side of the engine compartment right on the fuel rail. Ideally you would have a fuel pressure gauge hooked up and you would measure the pressure when cranking. IIRC, the pressure should be around 4.4 bar.
  8. Hmm if you didn't have to remove the wiring or remove the cable for the outer door handle it sounds like you may not have done the repair the way the service manual tells you to do it. Do you have pictures? I'm interested to see exactly what you did as it sounds like it might be an easier way to do the job.
  9. Nice work. Those tools are about the only way to diagnose a boost leak unless something is completely loose.
  10. This job is definitely not the same as a sports car. After removing the door panel you won't see a trace of the regulator. You have to remove the inner door aggregate as well, which can be quite a PITA. Its not rocket science but there are a few tricks to know. There are 4 T45 screws which hold the inner aggregate in. You'll also have to disconnect the door wiring harness from the vehicle. The door latch module and all the door wiring comes out with the aggregate so you'll have to undo the cable from the door lock to the outer door handle. Good luck.
  11. Either of these could cause your problem. However I have heard of a few people attempting to fix intermix problems by replacing the oil cooler and it didn't fix anything.
  12. How did you guys with cracked heads diagnose that was the cause of your intermix? Were the cracks visible? What part of the head? Do you have pictures?
  13. Its a pretty common problem. There are bushings that cause the horn to return once depressed. These bushings can wear out and cause what you're describing. Some people have rigged up some home made fixes but you can buy the "button" new and its fairly cheap.
  14. Definitely check fuel pressure. By far the most common cause of a crank but no start is the fuel pump.
  15. For MY99-2008 the engine number is inscribed on a small tab cast onto the engine just above the sealing surface of the oil pan on the passenger side IIRC. It might be covered with cosmoline or dirt so you may need to clean that off to see it. Unless you have a MY2009 or newer in which case its inscribed into a machined surface which faces downwards near the front of the engine (rear of the car)
  16. You should find it bolted to the body in the area underneath the ac controls. Center console R&R isn't required but it makes it easier. Its held with 10mm nuts.
  17. Definitely check your navigation disc version. I have seen this error in cars that were recently sold and the seller sticks a random nav disc they have lying around into the DVD drive. When you get the correct disc I would advise pulling the fuse for the PCM to reset it and the insert the correct nav disc into the DVD drive up front. That should take care of your issue. You need to figure out what software version your PCM is to tell what nav disc your need. You'll need to press the main and trip buttons at the same time to display that. Also there is usually a date printed on the nav disc itself, what does yours say? Once you figure out what version you need I may have a extra disc that I can get your for way cheaper than what a new one would cost you.
  18. I have only ever heard bad things about them, including from people who have worked there.
  19. Try checking your flywheel reference sender. You really need an oscilloscope to check it which not a lot of people have. Anyhow I have seen a couple of failing flywheel senders cause this type of scenario... car runs perfect but after driving it a while and coming back to start it it will crank but not start.
  20. An emergency release is exactly what it is. Either in case of battery failure or a failure of the normal release mechanism. The cable goes from the latch to the drivers rear fender liner and there is a loop that you can pull on which will unlatch the rear lid. I had the pleasure of unlocking one this way for a boxster owner I ran into in the gym parking lot who had locked his keys in his trunk. Whoops!
  21. I think those came in cars that have aluminum look door sill trim. They were supposed to be used to clean the sill trims.
  22. P0420 and P0430 are cat efficiency codes which usually indicate failing cats. With all of the problems you've been having with the your o2 sensors and cats, I would wonder if the aftermarket equipment isn't causing issues? That being said I would check your exhaust system over for leaks. A small exhaust leak will play with the sensor readings but even then they usually throw mixture related faults. You could try swapping the pre cat sensors between bank 1 and bank 2 and see if your P0133 switches over to bank 2. That should confirm if you really just a bad sensor or some other fault. As for the cat efficiency faults, usually by the time they throw these faults the material inside the cat is usually loose or visibly damaged. You could try banging on the cat with a rubber mallet and listening for anything loose sounding. If it sounds loose - you need new cat$.
  23. Seconded on the non OEM pump. The factory pumps aren't exactly robust but they should last 30-60K miles.
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