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I've been thinking....


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What if and what would be the outtake of someone putting in about maybe 32 fluid onces of anti freeze in each tire and then airing them up to the correct tire pressure? How would a car handle and would it keep the temperature cooler in summer and maybe prevent flat spots in the cold after extended parking? Has anyone tried it or heard of something like that being done before. What do you think? :rolleyes:

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What if and what would be the outtake of someone putting in about maybe 32 fluid onces of anti freeze in each tire and then airing them up to the correct tire pressure? How would a car handle and would it keep the temperature cooler in summer and maybe prevent flat spots in the cold after extended parking? Has anyone tried it or heard of something like that being done before. What do you think? :rolleyes:

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What if and what would be the outtake of someone putting in about maybe 32 fluid onces of anti freeze in each tire and then airing them up to the correct tire pressure? How would a car handle and would it keep the temperature cooler in summer and maybe prevent flat spots in the cold after extended parking? Has anyone tried it or heard of something like that being done before. What do you think? :rolleyes:

You would get degradation of the rubber due to a reaction with the antifreeze. Correct air pressure is all you need, along with wheel alignment to specs.

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WARDHOG,

I'm not a tire-expert, but have read that there are a few advantages to using Nitrogen to inflate your tires. Here's some of the claims:

1. Increased Safety. Tires inflated with nitrogen hold tire pressure longer. Nitrogen's larger molecules diffuse through tires at a much slower rate than air molecules. Proper tire pressure means better traction for safer operation & a reduced risk of tire failure due to over-heated tires. Tires run approximately 20% cooler than tire inflated with air.

2. Reduced Fuel Consumption. Vehicles consume less fuel b/c proper tire pressure improves rolling-resistance.

3. Extended Tire Life. When tires are properly inflated and run cooler they last longer. Tires inflated with nitrogen last as much as 25% longer than tires inflated with air. Oxidation, caused by moisture, is eliminated within the tire.

I believe the use of Nitrogen is pretty common in certain industries (aviation, exploration, transportation) & has been used by NASCAR for a while now.

I don't think you can pull into your local station to fill up on nitrogen, but understand the equipment is getting cheaper.

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<<<<Do you add air only once a year? pardon me, I must have misunderstood...

For myself, I have to add 1.45 psi per tire once a month to respect the 36 [front] : 44 [rear] psi levels>>>>

Yes...only once a year. This includes long (4,000 miles or more) trips as well as around town. Even in my other cars, if I had to add air every month, I would consider it a problem.

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I was a history major so take this with a grain of salt. Anti freeze is to keep water from freezing, and it has chemicals for rust prevention and lubricating rubber seals. I don't think anti freeze makes your engine run cooler. I have in the back of my mind that 100% water transfers heat better than a 50/50 mix, but you add anti freeze for the reasons stated.

So if I am correct, putting straight anti freeze or a mixture or straight water in a tire is not going to do anything about the heat inside a tire, unless you also have an external radiator to dissipate heat from the liquid. Whatever liquid in the tire would be the same temp as the air in the tire.

That is my history logic.

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What if and what would be the outtake of someone putting in about maybe 32 fluid onces of anti freeze in each tire and then airing them up to the correct tire pressure? How would a car handle and would it keep the temperature cooler in summer and maybe prevent flat spots in the cold after extended parking? Has anyone tried it or heard of something like that being done before. What do you think? :rolleyes:

Just let me know before you do it so I can call my broker in England and bet some money on you winning this one ->

http://www.darwinawards.com/darwin/

in 2005. :lol:

SCNR

Thorsten

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Here's a few technical corrections/updates to some the posts in this thread.

With respect to leak down of tire pressure and what to fill them with, there is no such thing as an "air molecule". Air is just a mixture of 78% Nitrogen, 21% oxygen and a trace amt of argon, water vapor and a bunch of other stuff. I am not sure why N2 filled tires would last longer or run cooler. I don't thing the thermoconductivity of N2 and O2 is very different. Nitrogen is a rather poor heat conductor relative to other gases, but I would expect the dominate cooling mechanism for the tires would be due to the high velocity of the air passing over them when you are driving. I guess that N2 is used in race car tires since it is very easy and cheap to get very low moisture content (ppm range); getting moisture out of compressed air is a bit more trouble.

As for mixing water and antifreeze (chemical name ethlyene gylcol), the freezing point of the mixture is lower than either of the pure products due to the thermodynamics of mixing (I will not trouble you with the details); however, by creating this mixture you reduce cooling effiency because water can carry more heat per unit volume than just about any other fluid. I don't remember where the mininum freezing point is, but is not a 50/50 mix.

Anyways, just a few technical tidbit for those (dis) interested parties.

Antifreeze in the tires??? Hey, I got some halogen headlight fluid to sell you. I'll make super deal on it for only $50/quart. Guaranteed to make your headlights twice as bright..... :P

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