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I have a high milage 2011 diesel Cayenne (90k mls) and want to change to ATF. There are tutorials around on ATF change with the earler pre 2011 models but have not found any related to the later models. Anybody done this that could offer advice?

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Thanks for the input. The workshop manual also talks about draining the ATF from the cooling lines which exit from the left side of the transmission casing . Has anybody done that?

 

 

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The instructions:

 

post-67622-0-55506900-1462119851_thumb.j

post-67622-0-68407200-1462119867_thumb.j

 

There are more detailed instructions on the fill - but they're basically the same as these. No mention whatsoever is made of a separate ATF fill plug, not to say it doesn't exist (it should..) but the factory manual and AllData never mention it. 

 

To me - the top tool they (1389) show appears that one of the probes would go up through the drain/level pipe and inject ATF above it. The need or use of the other probe may be for other transmissions..  The pipe like adaptor (1390) appears it would screw into the "drain" in place of the plug, and tool 1389 would go through it and snap into it.  You would pump fluid up into the transmission and periodically pull out the 1389 tool to see if the oil level had reached the top of the pipe inside the fill/drain plug.

 

MORE - thinking about what they're doing.. IF the pipe like adaptor (1390) is the correct length, and the snap-on probe part of 1389 are the right length, the second leg on 1389 makes sense. If it is designed when assembled and inserted into 1390 to be the height of the level pipe inside the transmission - ie - the desired fluid height - then opening the valve on that leg when the system isn't pumping fluid would give an indication if the fluid is at the level desired.  It all sort of makes sense.

 

In lieu of having the two tools - the pipe built into the drain/fill port can be used to check the level.

Edited by deilenberger

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Found some references to the tools:

 

https://vw.snapon.com/specialtoolsdetail.aspx?itemid=18860006 - seemed to be the best price. This is 1389..  $117

 

https://vw.snapon.com/specialtoolsdetail.aspx?itemid=34720006 - best price again. This is 1390. $17.

 

You can create a personal account on this SnapOn website. I did to get the assembly/alignment pins for the Turbo brakes (a special tool)

 

Or you could watch:

 

The video shows what appears to be filling it via the drain hole/overflow tube.

Edited by deilenberger

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Heard from my friend:

 

Yes it's very confusing to try to understand, and some of the info contradicts all the other instructions I've read. It really is the same as the BMW procedure, fill til it runs out, bring up to temp and fill again. Many are confused by the fact you have to fill through the drain plug. The parts schematic on Automobile Atlanta shows a fill plug, and there may be one but it's covered by the transfer case. Probably used in the mfg process for initial fill.

 

Edited by deilenberger

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The overflow tube in my car seems to be fine... it's not broken..however when I remove the inspection plug, it drained the fluid completely... I'd say about 8 quarts of it... I am gonna use an allen wrench to remove the overflow tube to see if there is any damage in it..

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Found some references to the tools:

 

https://vw.snapon.com/specialtoolsdetail.aspx?itemid=18860006 - seemed to be the best price. This is 1389..  $117

 

https://vw.snapon.com/specialtoolsdetail.aspx?itemid=34720006 - best price again. This is 1390. $17.

 

You can create a personal account on this SnapOn website. I did to get the assembly/alignment pins for the Turbo brakes (a special tool)

 

Or you could watch:

 

The video shows what appears to be filling it via the drain hole/overflow tube.

Thanks for the links and video. It is for 955 model which has 2 plugs.. one is drain and the other one is fill plug..

Edited by Nixer

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IMG_20160501_135000459_zpszductw8q.jpgIt was really easy to get the overflow pipe out off the pan. When I took it out, 2 more quarts of fluid came out... 

Edited by Nixer

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Most BMW transmissions, which use a similar design - you can only change about half the fluid at a time - since a lot of it is in the torque converter and most won't come out unless you disassemble and drain the transmission completely. I have heard numbers of 7-8 liters of fluid needed to do a change, so that pretty much agrees with the amount you've had come out. When the transmission is running - the oil pump in it keeps a lot of the fluid in the transmission fluid passages, solenoids, torque-converter. Once stopped it drains back down into the pan, which is what you experienced when you opened the drain plug without the engine running.

 

And if the fill plug really isn't accessible - then injecting the fluid into the transmission while the engine is running (then doing the gear-shift dance) through the overflow pipe seems the way to go. I suspect I'd be looking at modifying a cheap pressure garden sprayer to use..

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Most BMW transmissions, which use a similar design - you can only change about half the fluid at a time - since a lot of it is in the torque converter and most won't come out unless you disassemble and drain the transmission completely. I have heard numbers of 7-8 liters of fluid needed to do a change, so that pretty much agrees with the amount you've had come out. When the transmission is running - the oil pump in it keeps a lot of the fluid in the transmission fluid passages, solenoids, torque-converter. Once stopped it drains back down into the pan, which is what you experienced when you opened the drain plug without the engine running.

 

And if the fill plug really isn't accessible - then injecting the fluid into the transmission while the engine is running (then doing the gear-shift dance) through the overflow pipe seems the way to go. I suspect I'd be looking at modifying a cheap pressure garden sprayer to use..

Yes, that makes better sense. I am planning to modify the garden sprayer to use for this as well.

 

Here is a thread in tdiclub.com... just what I was looking for.

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=169356

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That does clearly explain the fill/level check. Doing it with a garden-sprayer should make it relatively painless.

 

Yes, that makes better sense. I am planning to modify the garden sprayer to use for this as well.

 

 

Here is a thread in tdiclub.com... just what I was looking for.

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=169356

Edited by deilenberger

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I have read on posts elsewhere that the wheels need to turn while you go through the gear shift dance in the second part of the fill process involving warming up the ATF to 40 degrees and completing the fill. I note that the workshop manual simply describes moving the gear shift slowly through all the shift positions pausing for about two seconds at each position. Does any body know whether the wheels need to turn in order to get ATF into the torque converter etc?

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I have read on posts elsewhere that the wheels need to turn while you go through the gear shift dance in the second part of the fill process involving warming up the ATF to 40 degrees and completing the fill. I note that the workshop manual simply describes moving the gear shift slowly through all the shift positions pausing for about two seconds at each position. Does any body know whether the wheels need to turn in order to get ATF into the torque converter etc?

 

No.  With the engine running, and the trans in gear, the front  pump is running at full pressure and everything is full.

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IMG_20160501_135000459_zpszductw8q.jpgIt was really easy to get the overflow pipe out off the pan. When I took it out, 2 more quarts of fluid came out... 

Hi Nixer I'm about to do my ATF change. Can you tell me, do you think I could pass a 5mm plastic tube up through the green plastic overflow pipe pictured in your last post in order to carry out the refill procedure? Also can you confirm that you collected about 10 quarts out through the drain plug after taking out the overflow pipe? thanks bill

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IMG_20160501_135000459_zpszductw8q.jpgIt was really easy to get the overflow pipe out off the pan. When I took it out, 2 more quarts of fluid came out... 

Hi Nixer I'm about to do my ATF change. Can you tell me, do you think I could pass a 5mm plastic tube up through the green plastic overflow pipe pictured in your last post in order to carry out the refill procedure? Also can you confirm that you collected about 10 quarts out through the drain plug after taking out the overflow pipe? thanks bill

 

I used VAS6262/2 tool and that made it very easy. The overflow tube is really thin and it will probably take longer to fill by inserting a plastic tube through it... so yes it can be done.

 

I collected only about 6 liters when I drained ATF...most of it came out when I removed the drain plug and about a liter when I removed the overflow tube.

When I did cold fill, I was able to fill only 3 liters..I started the car briefly and shut it off.. I was able to fill 2 more liters after that. 

 

I need to find a way to measure the ATF temperature so I can top off ATF to the correct level.

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I need to find a way to measure the ATF temperature so I can top off ATF to the correct level.

 

 

Non contact pyrometer or a kitchen temp probe are the DIY favorites.

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I need to find a way to measure the ATF temperature so I can top off ATF to the correct level.

 

 

Non contact pyrometer or a kitchen temp probe are the DIY favorites.

 

Thanks! I need to get one of those..

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I need to find a way to measure the ATF temperature so I can top off ATF to the correct level.

 

 

Non contact pyrometer or a kitchen temp probe are the DIY favorites.

 

Thanks! I need to get one of those..

 

 

You can find one on Amazon for less than $20:

 

71jLSnedm1L._SL1500_.jpg

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I need to find a way to measure the ATF temperature so I can top off ATF to the correct level.

 

 

Non contact pyrometer or a kitchen temp probe are the DIY favorites.

 

Thanks! I need to get one of those..

 

 

You can find one on Amazon for less than $20:

 

71jLSnedm1L._SL1500_.jpg

 

 

Dang.... now I had to buy one of those (actually the higher temperature version 630)  :D

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