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:welcome:

You will find a Brake Pad DIY here.

Loren, I used the DIY, along with some others this weekend to replace my front pads and rotors. Thanks so much for contributing great information. While it wasn't a terribly complex task, it was reassuring to have read through these instructions and some others prior to pulling things apart.

I do wonder why the instructions recommend replacement of the pad spring and the retaining pin assembly. Mine were in perfect shape, not counting accumulated brake grime. I also replaced the screws that attach the rotor to the hub but only ordered two, hence I have two new ones in one side and two reused ones on the other. I don't think that is going to be a problem though.

The only other thing that I am curious about now is the wear sensor indicators. I used a mount and a drill press to drill the new Hawk pads to accept the wear sensors without any problem. I thought that would 'fix' them from coming on as it appeared that only the outside plastic was worn through. The thick wire of the sensors appeared intact. However, my light has returned. Any ideas? I'm not entirely convinced that I need them but I'd like to keep things as 'complete' as possible so there aren't any questions in the future.

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Porsche considers the pads spring a replacement item because they can be overheated and lose tension. My understanding on the bolts is that when they are installed (the first time) they are torqued to a specific stretch limit and if you re-torque them they lose some strength. For most daily drivers that is not likely a problem.

Check the wire connections on each pad sensor. If you have access to an ohm meter you can unplug each sensor and check the continuity through the sensor to find a bad one. Or. some folks just twist two wires together and tie-wrap them to the chassis.

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........you have access to an ohm meter you can unplug each sensor and check the continuity through the sensor to find a bad one. Or. some folks just twist two wires together and tie-wrap them to the chassis.

Hadn't thought to check the resistance. :cursing: Doh! I'll check that once I get back from Deal's Gap this weekend.

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Porsche considers the pads spring a replacement item because they can be overheated and lose tension. My understanding on the bolts is that when they are installed (the first time) they are torqued to a specific stretch limit and if you re-torque them they lose some strength. For most daily drivers that is not likely a problem.

...

As you said, replacing the springs is just a general precaution that practically all brake manufacturers recommend.

The bolts are not torque-to-yield, so they don't lose any of their strength when re-used. The reason Porsche recommend changing them is that they have some protective coating that wears off once you've installed them.

It's not a bad idea to change them, particularly if you live in a corrosive environment, e.g. close to the sea. I have seen bolts strip the thread out of wheel carriers a couple of times, particularly with the new bolts that are slightly longer than the old ones and stick out the wheel carrier a little bit. That said, most workshops would not delay repairs just because they haven't got new bolts available. :rolleyes:

Cheers,

Uwe

Edited by umn
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  • 6 months later...
Hi, new to forum I need to put new pads on my 2004 911 c2 I can't seem to find a DIY please help thanks Rob

I will be tracking my car and plan on switching from track pads to street pads quite often. Is changing the the pad springs necessary? Thanks!

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