Jump to content

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

JFP in PA

Moderators
  • Content Count

    7,036
  • Donations

    $0.00 
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    43

Everything posted by JFP in PA

  1. Not necessarily; check your crank position sensor. When the CPS stops registering rotation, the DME shuts off the power to the fuel system and the ignition because it thinks the engine is not turning. And a bad CPS will not always throw codes.
  2. Appears to be L/s squared, or liter per second squared, which would be a volumetric measurement.
  3. It is a UK car, which came with sirens, which also had their own batteries, which is probably the issue here. The black box is the siren, the lower box is a tilt sensor, which is apparently well known for causing problems. The unit sits next to the main battery, under a cover. Here it is out of the car:
  4. We have worked with both the Schnell and the B&M units, personally I find the B&M unit better made and have seen far fewer problems with it.
  5. Anytime. As often quoted, the devil is always in the details...…………….
  6. You need to wait 45-60 min. to allow the normal shutdown of systems in the car that do that to reduce drain. That process is completely normal.
  7. You need to run a parasitic drain test. Put a digital multimeter in between the battery positive terminal and the disconnected positive cable, with the meter set on mA. Wait at least 45 min. and it should read 40-60 mA. If it reads higher, start pulling fuses one at a time until it drops into that range; the last fuse you pulled is the source of your drain.
  8. Check the cable at the transmission end, those ends are known to come loose.
  9. Problem is that the fourth stalk moves on two axis; forward and back, and up and down. If the mirror switch can mimic those motions, and generate momentary contact, it might work. You would need to research the wiring as I have no experience trying to do it this way.
  10. Probably not, the stalk functions as a momentary contact switch, if the mirror selector switch is on/off in two of the four positions, that would cause the OBC to continuously cycle in those position. You are also going to either purchase a premade aftermarket wiring harnesses for the cluster to function with either a dash switch or with the fourth stalk, or make up your own. Fabing your own is going to require finding specific size pin connectors to match the connectors already in the dash. VW used to carry them. It is much cleaner to use the fourth stalk, which can actually added without taking the column apart, or simply source the four stalk multifunctional switch and replace the three stalk. We have done several of these, but always replaced the multifunction switch with the four stalk version to retain the clean factory look to the conversion. If your dash displays the outside temp, the system is active.
  11. Durametric has to walk a very fine line in their diagnostic system as they are operating inside Porsche's proprietary diagnostic systems, and they know Porsche will come down on them hard if they reproduce anything Porsche sees as protected intellectual property. People have caught the rath of Porsche's lawyers for as little as reproducing a page for a vehicle's owners manual, and Durametric does not want to go there. And like all diagnostic systems manufacturer's, they expect the use has a modicum of knowledge of industry standards and terminology, and access to service information for the vehicle. BCM for example is an industry standard term, and means Body Control Module, and is a control system for non engine or driveline components such as lights, windows, security, door locks and access control, and various comfort controls. Service resets are similar, with oil being obvious, while interim is for service items the come up between major or main service interval items (30K miles, 60K miles, etc.), and is again an industry standard term that applies to either your Macan or a Ford Fiesta.
  12. We made our own using a 134A line with a M14X1.5 adaptor on it to connect to the fitting on the pan. You can also buy Porsche's line, part# 000.721.950.71 Connecting hose -- US MSRP $40.05.
  13. I've never seen one rebuilt. I think you are going to have to bite the bullet on this one...…………….
  14. Welcome to RennTech Board sponsor Sunset Porsche carries the part for $4,636.
  15. We fix them for a living, so over time we develop “work arounds” to offset problems like this. When we get a customer complaining about constant smoke start ups, first we check the sump vacuum level with a digital manometer to make sure the AOS is still functional, then we look at the oil level. Lowering the oil level just slightly helps, but the part was designed to be serviced on regular intervals, much like the water pumps, which need to be changed out proactively to prevent the impellers from breaking up and getting scattered through the cooling system. It is just the way things are......
  16. If you are suffering issues with the factory AOS, I would be looking at your oil sump level; cold, it should be one to two lines below the maximum level. Overfilling the sump to the max indication can shorten the lifespan of the AOS. We see this issue all the time as people tend to fill the oil to the max line and beyond (there is no indication of when the system is overfilled). That said, the factory AOS units, while the best available, are not impervious to failures. Like brake pads or a clutch, they are considered maintenance consumables. I think the two parts you are referring to are oil scavenging units, which are designed to help get the oil out of the cam covers and back to the sump, and they are rarely if ever replaced.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.