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Just Bought 86 911 And Think I Might Have Some Major Problems


3rdTimeOffender

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Since I don't yet have a manual, could anyone tell me what the red light that stays on next to the parking brake light is? I thought it was some sort of check engine light. It sorta looks like a circle with dashed lines on the outside.

Also the car seems to be running hotter than normal or at least the temp gauge has the white tick marks and it reaches the top white tick mark. I have checked the oil level and it is good. Of course when she runs hot and then sits, she blows a lot of smoke.

Previous owner scammed me I think. He told me engine only had 5k on it but after I have inspected it seems not to be the case.

Any suggestions for how to make engine run cooler? Also, the oil gauge is pegged which makes me think the sending unit is bad. How do I check the thermostats? The oil line on the passenger side was hot and the one on the driver side was cold. Does that mean the oil is not flowing through the front oil cooler?

Thanks for the help.

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The symbol you describe is the Brake-pad Wear Indicator. The brake pads are fitted with a small contact, that completes a circuit when one, or more, of the brake pads are worn down to the specified limit. You will need to remove the brake pads in order to determine which one is / are worn below that limit [You will be able to see the contact.] and replace the Front or Rear pads, as sets, as required!

Regarding the Oil Temperature, mine mormally runs somewhere between the Bottom [Larger] and the First [smaller] Indicator Mark, depending on ambient and operating conditions. On a particularly hot day, when idling in traffic, for a long peroid, I can expect mine to run up to, or even above, the Second [small] Indicator Mark, since there is little or no Airflow through the Oil Cooler.

Of course, as you suggest, the gauge, and / or, sender might be faulty! I would expect SOME smoke after a long idling period, since it will build up a little in the exhaust system!

Bear in mind that, the Cooling Fan will also effect overall engine temperature. Is the Fan Drive Belt in good order and correctly tensioned?

Also, how did you check the Oil Level? Checking the level Accurately, can only be achieved by using the Dipstick, with the Engine Running and at normal opearating temperature. The indicator gauge on the dash is, as the name suggests, no more than an indication of oil level!

I would have expected a 1986 car to have clocked-up rather more than 5,000 miles! Are you saying that the engine has been rebuilt, and has 5,000 miles on it? What does the oddometer read?

Hope this information helps a bit!

R.

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The symbol you describe is the Brake-pad Wear Indicator. The brake pads are fitted with a small contact, that completes a circuit when one, or more, of the brake pads are worn down to the specified limit. You will need to remove the brake pads in order to determine which one is / are worn below that limit [You will be able to see the contact.] and replace the Front or Rear pads, as sets, as required!

Regarding the Oil Temperature, mine mormally runs somewhere between the Bottom [Larger] and the First [smaller] Indicator Mark, depending on ambient and operating conditions. On a particularly hot day, when idling in traffic, for a long peroid, I can expect mine to run up to, or even above, the Second [small] Indicator Mark, since there is little or no Airflow through the Oil Cooler.

Of course, as you suggest, the gauge, and / or, sender might be faulty! I would expect SOME smoke after a long idling period, since it will build up a little in the exhaust system!

Bear in mind that, the Cooling Fan will also effect overall engine temperature. Is the Fan Drive Belt in good order and correctly tensioned?

Also, how did you check the Oil Level? Checking the level Accurately, can only be achieved by using the Dipstick, with the Engine Running and at normal opearating temperature. The indicator gauge on the dash is, as the name suggests, no more than an indication of oil level!

I would have expected a 1986 car to have clocked-up rather more than 5,000 miles! Are you saying that the engine has been rebuilt, and has 5,000 miles on it? What does the oddometer read?

Hope this information helps a bit!

R.

R,

Thanks for the info on the brake indicator. The previous owner told me that the engine was rebuilt 5k ago but the car has around 167k miles total. I checked the oil after 20 minutes od good driving to get the temp up and I also kept the engine running while the car was on flat ground. It was down only a quart which I guess seems natural but I don't know the last time the oil was checked or changed since I don't really believe the previous owner. I had no where to get the PPI done but I plan to get a post buy inspection done by a reputable shop so I know what I have gotten myself into. Thanks for the info on the engine temp also. It has never exceeded the second tick mark yet. The fan drive is newer and to me seems tensioned okay but I don't have any specs on what that tension needs to be.

I ordered the Bentley service manual.

Thanks

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  • 1 year later...
  • 2 weeks later...

You also need to check those oil lines on the right side of the car to insure neither line has been crushed. Even a small looking crimp in those hard oil lines will impede oil flow and affect the flow of oil to the front cooler.

The external oil thermostat is located in front of the rear passenger side wheel. At this age and mileage, I wouldn't be surprised if that oil thermostat is no longer working properly. Or, you could have both a crimped line and a non functioning external oil thermostat. Once the car is warm, feel those lines on the bottom of the car, closer to the front of the car (even in the front passenger side wheel well). If the oil is circulating correctly, one line will be very hot to the touch, another will be much cooler. Of course one line is supplying hot oil to the front cooler and one line is returning cooled oil back to the motor.

It's probably worth it to have the external oil thermostat changed regardless of what is wrong.

I agree with Richard on where the oil temp gauge should read during normal operating conditions.

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  • 2 weeks later...

In addition to the hard (metal) lines that run underneath the passenger side of the car you will need to check the rubber hoses that connect those lines to the car. If the engine was rebuilt a reputable shop would have replaced these hoses if they were hard and cracked. You should be able to squeeze these hoses and they should flex inward. If they are hard as stones they need to be replaced.

As for oil temp, one way to keep the temp down is drive faster :) . At idle the temp will creep up but should fall back in normal driving to the halfway mark or less (at least it does so in mine). As the others above has said, it may also mean you have a kink or blockage in one of the oil lines. Have that inspected, and take it to a shop that knows Porsches, especially old ones. It is very easy to crush the oil lines when putting the car on a hoist. The shop must be very care full when lifting the car, and if you're there at the time of the inspection (which is a very good idea so they can show you what the situation is) take a look under the car as they are lifting it to ensure that they don't damage the lines, and if they do that they replace them.

Good luck!

J

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  • 1 month later...
Since I don't yet have a manual, could anyone tell me what the red light that stays on next to the parking brake light is? I thought it was some sort of check engine light. It sorta looks like a circle with dashed lines on the outside.

Also the car seems to be running hotter than normal or at least the temp gauge has the white tick marks and it reaches the top white tick mark. I have checked the oil level and it is good. Of course when she runs hot and then sits, she blows a lot of smoke.

Previous owner scammed me I think. He told me engine only had 5k on it but after I have inspected it seems not to be the case.

Any suggestions for how to make engine run cooler? Also, the oil gauge is pegged which makes me think the sending unit is bad. How do I check the thermostats? The oil line on the passenger side was hot and the one on the driver side was cold. Does that mean the oil is not flowing through the front oil cooler?

Thanks for the help.

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1. Add an '86 Turbo oil cooler which has a built in fan.

2. Install:

a. A Nason TT-E3A197R/QCGG 197 degrees (F) temperature sensor. The 1/4" NPT fits the cooler

metric temperature switch thread. Not the Porsche sensor which activates the fan @ 248 degrees (F).

b. A 1986 930 Turbo Porsche wiring harness from the relay/fuse panel.

c. A Porsche relay to sense the oil cooler temperature and activate the fan.

3. Also, replace the the oil temperature indicator with a direct readout insert from VDO

by removing the oil level/temp gauge from the cluster and removing the dial plate.

This will give you an oil temp reading in degees as opposed to red and white.

When your existing gauge is at the 9 o'clock position, your oil temp is 210 degees F.

An ongoing oil temp of 185-210 degrees will preserve your 911 engine live considerably.

4. Our 911 (105,000 miles) almost never exceeds 210 degrees F even in traffic, on a hot day in

Palm Springs, and does not leak oil anywhere.

Our most recent oil consuption data indicates about 900 miles/quart.

High engine temps is what kills 911 motors...........

After you resolve this issue Email me at slyboots96@gmail.com for A/C (ProCooler) upgrades.

Our A/C gives us 45 Degrees at the center duct on a 95 degree day, and as low as 35 degrees

on an 80 degree day.

Good luck!

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