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I recently returned the suspension on my Boxster S to stock and during the process, I wrote up instructions to help anyone who might want to change springs/struts and/or camber plates.

http://gwl.rmsolo.org/hacks/suspension/index.html

Overall this is not a difficult job but it can be somewhat time consuming the first time you do it.

Graeme

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What is the largest spare wheel I can fit in the rear trunk. :P

I am thinking about a 987. Does it have a spare tire?

Well, it is good to see a section for brakes, tires, wheels, and suspension.

Brush up on your math for offset and spacer questions.

post-4-1107941737_thumb.jpg

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Highlander, thank you for posting up that write-up! I am in the middle of doing the wife's euro m030 suspension on her Boxster and started to do it myself as I have never really had any issues replacing suspensions. The torques and tips will help me get her car off of the jack stands, thanks.:D

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I recently returned the suspension on my Boxster S to stock and during the process, I wrote up instructions to help anyone who might want to change springs/struts and/or camber plates.

http://gwl.rmsolo.org/hacks/suspension/index.html

Overall this is not a difficult job but it can be somewhat time consuming the first time you do it.

Graeme

Thanks for the info, I just started last night installing PSS9 on my 2002 Boxster S. Do you have any experience with different sway bars? The H&R ($400) has 22 & 26 mm bars, but are non-adjustable. The Stable Energies ($500) are 19 & 25.5 mm but are adjustable. Would you suggest the fixed or the adjustable? Also, with the PSS9, what would recommend for a ride height? I plan on driving it on the street as well as to DE events. TOM

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Great write-up Graeme! I recently underwent a change to the M030 kit on my '01 boxster, armed with a printout of your web site. I frequently referred to your photos and torque specs, as well as the factory service manual.

I'd like to only comment regarding the separation of the lower ball joint. I didn't have the handy-dandy separator that you used, and resorted to a similar tool borrowed from a friend, for the smaller joints. Unfortunately, the tool would not work on the larger, lower joint.

Instead, for the front, I was able to get my friend to help me push down on the strut, such that the top of it cleared the fender. This allowed it to easily lift out of the knuckle. For the rear, I removed the forward alignment bolt (one of the excentrics), which allowed the tie rod to drop and move in toward the engine. Thus, the whole knuckle assembly can drop, thus allowing the strut to easily clear the fender and lift from the knuckle.

I did a quick tape-measure alignment and went on to win the SS class at my local autocross! Not bad, eh?

Thanks again! :-)

-Chris

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Graeme,

I recently completely changed my suspension over to the ROW M030 setup. It was the first time I have ever worked on Porsche suspension, and I used your guide. It was a great help to me during the process. Good illustrations and clear instruction.

Thanks for taking the time to put such a great guide together. :thumbup:

One note to potential users: When you get to the rear suspension, I found it much easier to unbolt the lower control arm at the chassis, than to split the lower ball joint - even though I have the Porsche type splitter tool. Just clean the adjuster cams good with brake cleaner first and let them dry, then mark the cam positions with a sharpie before loostening the bolts. Then its easy to put them right back in the same positions.

Edited by Andy_M

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Graeme,

I recently completely changed my suspension over to the ROW M030 setup. It was the first time I have ever worked on Porsche suspension, and I used your guide. It was a great help to me during the process. Good illustrations and clear instruction.

Thanks for taking the time to put such a great guide together. :thumbup:

One note to potential users: When you get to the rear suspension, I found it much easier to unbolt the lower control arm at the chassis, than to split the lower ball joint - even though I have the Porsche type splitter tool. Just clean the adjuster cams good with brake cleaner first and let them dry, then mark the cam positions with a sharpie before loostening the bolts. Then its easy to put them right back in the same positions.

Unfortunately because those eccentrics have so much slop in them, this in no way guarantees that you're at the same alignment as when you started. If you've ever aligned one of these cars you know that if you turn the eccentric, often no change in alignment will occur for the first 1/16 of a turn!

You may be fine - but I'd suggest getting an alignment.

Quick question - did you still have to disconnect the axle doing it your way (removing the eccentric bolt)?

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Unfortunately because those eccentrics have so much slop in them, this in no way guarantees that you're at the same alignment as when you started. If you've ever aligned one of these cars you know that if you turn the eccentric, often no change in alignment will occur for the first 1/16 of a turn!

this is partially true for the toe eccentrics, but not the camber eccentrics on the lower control arms. i have a SmartCamber guage that i use to verify camber after this type of work. i've had the rear control arms removed four or five times. if i set the eccentric to its previous position, the camber doesn't change at all.

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A buddy and I just did another M030 install. Three hours start to finish, both ends of the car. I found that the biggest pain in the a$$ in this job is removing and reinstalling the rear axle. So this time, we didn't do it.

We found it to be much quicker and easier to do the rear by disconnecting the rear camber eccentric bolt. If you do this, you don't need to remove the lower ball joint, you don't have to pry the control arm, you don't have to remove the axle and you don't have to remove the brake calipers.

Attached is a pic showing what I mean. I'm sure some of you knew this but nobody ever attached a picture.

post-7203-1179681417_thumb.jpg

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We found it to be much quicker and easier to do the rear by disconnecting the rear camber eccentric bolt. If you do this, you don't need to remove the lower ball joint, you don't have to pry the control arm, you don't have to remove the axle and you don't have to remove the brake calipers.

that's definitely the way to do it. i've done several of these and never removed the axles. it's actually possible to split the ball joint and still remove the strut assembly with the axles and lower control arm in place. it's FAR easier, though, to remove the entire lower control arm and leave the ball joint in tact. three hours must be some kind of record! the best i can do is four, but that's just one man.

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We found it to be much quicker and easier to do the rear by disconnecting the rear camber eccentric bolt. If you do this, you don't need to remove the lower ball joint, you don't have to pry the control arm, you don't have to remove the axle and you don't have to remove the brake calipers.

that's definitely the way to do it. i've done several of these and never removed the axles. it's actually possible to split the ball joint and still remove the strut assembly with the axles and lower control arm in place. it's FAR easier, though, to remove the entire lower control arm and leave the ball joint in tact. three hours must be some kind of record! the best i can do is four, but that's just one man.

Yeah, after doing it this way I can't imagine why anyone would remove the axles, calipers, etc.

I did the front without cracking the ball joints or control arm or caliper as well - but it's kind of a wash as to whether that method is easier or not.

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We found it to be much quicker and easier to do the rear by disconnecting the rear camber eccentric bolt. If you do this, you don't need to remove the lower ball joint, you don't have to pry the control arm, you don't have to remove the axle and you don't have to remove the brake calipers.

that's definitely the way to do it. i've done several of these and never removed the axles. it's actually possible to split the ball joint and still remove the strut assembly with the axles and lower control arm in place. it's FAR easier, though, to remove the entire lower control arm and leave the ball joint in tact. three hours must be some kind of record! the best i can do is four, but that's just one man.

Yeah, after doing it this way I can't imagine why anyone would remove the axles, calipers, etc.

I did the front without cracking the ball joints or control arm or caliper as well - but it's kind of a wash as to whether that method is easier or not.

i think the fronts are much easier to remove without splitting the ball joints. no risk of ripping a boot, either.

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Graeme,

I recently completely changed my suspension over to the ROW M030 setup. It was the first time I have ever worked on Porsche suspension, and I used your guide. It was a great help to me during the process. Good illustrations and clear instruction.

Thanks for taking the time to put such a great guide together. :thumbup:

One note to potential users: When you get to the rear suspension, I found it much easier to unbolt the lower control arm at the chassis, than to split the lower ball joint - even though I have the Porsche type splitter tool. Just clean the adjuster cams good with brake cleaner first and let them dry, then mark the cam positions with a sharpie before loostening the bolts. Then its easy to put them right back in the same positions.

Unfortunately because those eccentrics have so much slop in them, this in no way guarantees that you're at the same alignment as when you started. If you've ever aligned one of these cars you know that if you turn the eccentric, often no change in alignment will occur for the first 1/16 of a turn!

You may be fine - but I'd suggest getting an alignment.

Quick question - did you still have to disconnect the axle doing it your way (removing the eccentric bolt)?

Right, but it puts it back close enough to get it to the alignment shop. For me, it's a given that anytime your changing suspension components an alignment is mandatory afterwards. I wouldn't even think of not doing one.

I already had the axle loose before I decided to go with removing the excentrics bolt, but no, you wouldn't have to.

Edited by Andy_M

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Unfortunately because those eccentrics have so much slop in them, this in no way guarantees that you're at the same alignment as when you started. If you've ever aligned one of these cars you know that if you turn the eccentric, often no change in alignment will occur for the first 1/16 of a turn!

this is partially true for the toe eccentrics, but not the camber eccentrics on the lower control arms. i have a SmartCamber guage that i use to verify camber after this type of work. i've had the rear control arms removed four or five times. if i set the eccentric to its previous position, the camber doesn't change at all.

I just verified that this is not true (at least for my car). I strung up the car last night to verify the toe prior to the ProSolo this weekend. The right rear was off because when I did the last suspension swap I removed the camber eccentric. Even though it was marked and put back to the same location, it caused the toe to be off. 5/32" in on the right rear.

I should add that my toe eccentrics are set to as much toe-out as possible - so there is no more range of adjustment there - hence why I had to make the adjustment at the camber eccentric.

I put the car on the slip plates and loosened the camber eccentric. I verified that there is about 1/16 of a turn of "slop" in the camber eccentric which makes sense - the camber eccentric is "captive" but it can still move laterally a bit once loose. Depending how the bolt is loaded (which is basically saying depending on which way it was last turned) you can get +/- changes in toe and camber. I tweaked it out and tightened it once the toe reached the right location.

Camber change was minimal - I gained a slight bit of negative camber but really the goal was to get rid of the toe-in.

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I just verified that this is not true (at least for my car). I strung up the car last night to verify the toe prior to the ProSolo this weekend. The right rear was off because when I did the last suspension swap I removed the camber eccentric. Even though it was marked and put back to the same location, it caused the toe to be off. 5/32" in on the right rear.

I should add that my toe eccentrics are set to as much toe-out as possible - so there is no more range of adjustment there - hence why I had to make the adjustment at the camber eccentric.

I put the car on the slip plates and loosened the camber eccentric. I verified that there is about 1/16 of a turn of "slop" in the camber eccentric which makes sense - the camber eccentric is "captive" but it can still move laterally a bit once loose. Depending how the bolt is loaded (which is basically saying depending on which way it was last turned) you can get +/- changes in toe and camber. I tweaked it out and tightened it once the toe reached the right location.

Camber change was minimal - I gained a slight bit of negative camber but really the goal was to get rid of the toe-in.

wow; good to know. maybe i just got lucky; 5/32 is a lot. why are you toed all the way out in back? is the car lowered a lot? tarrett arms? out of curiosity, when you string your car, do you just do parallels on each side of the car, or do you use a center line for thrust angle?

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wow; good to know. maybe i just got lucky; 5/32 is a lot. why are you toed all the way out in back? is the car lowered a lot? tarrett arms? out of curiosity, when you string your car, do you just do parallels on each side of the car, or do you use a center line for thrust angle?

The car is set up for minimum rear camber and zero rear toe. To acheive zero toe you set the toe adjusters to as low as they go and then dial in negative camber until the toe actually reaches zero. If you were to set the camber adjusters to "max positive" rear camber (about -1.0 to -1.2 degrees) and then set the toe you would not be able to get out all of the toe-in. Make sense? :)

To string the car we set the strings to be parallel to one another, then measure how much the car is misaligned between the parallel strings and adjust the strings (equally on each side obviously) to compensate. That leaves you with parallel strings and a car which is parallel to them.

HTH,

John

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wow; good to know. maybe i just got lucky; 5/32 is a lot. why are you toed all the way out in back? is the car lowered a lot? tarrett arms? out of curiosity, when you string your car, do you just do parallels on each side of the car, or do you use a center line for thrust angle?

The car is set up for minimum rear camber and zero rear toe. To acheive zero toe you set the toe adjusters to as low as they go and then dial in negative camber until the toe actually reaches zero. If you were to set the camber adjusters to "max positive" rear camber (about -1.0 to -1.2 degrees) and then set the toe you would not be able to get out all of the toe-in. Make sense? :)

To string the car we set the strings to be parallel to one another, then measure how much the car is misaligned between the parallel strings and adjust the strings (equally on each side obviously) to compensate. That leaves you with parallel strings and a car which is parallel to them.

i usually use two plumb bobs at the midpoints of the sway bars (as measured from the control arm mounts). i then use a laser straight to strike a centerline. i measure to the centerline from the toe plates to get toe. as for camber, it seems odd that you're only able to get -1.0 to -1.2. maybe i'm misunderstanding. isn't the factory setting between -1.6 and -1.8? why are you running minimum rear camber? acceleration (auto-X)? just curious as to why people do what they do.

i was running about -2.0 in back and -1.6 up front most recently. this proved to be too much neg for street tires; they actually wore on the insides at the track. this time i'm going to run -1.2 up front and -1.9 in back. i'm going for 1/16" total toe (slow track, < 110mph). i'm going to try toe out (1/16") for the irst time up front.

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as for camber, it seems odd that you're only able to get -1.0 to -1.2. maybe i'm misunderstanding. isn't the factory setting between -1.6 and -1.8?

I could probably get -2.0 if I wanted more negative. I want less negative camber in the back (or ... "most positive"). Increases in rear camber only make the car unpredictable at the limit, especially in transitions, and make the car more "pushy" in low-speed corners. I also do ProSolos in this car, and it maximizes the launch if the camber is minimum. I run 245/35/18 fronts and 285/30/18 rears so there is some understeer built-in as a result of that, but removing all the rear camber and toe makes the car very well balanced.

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I could probably get -2.0 if I wanted more negative. I want less negative camber in the back (or ... "most positive"). Increases in rear camber only make the car unpredictable at the limit, especially in transitions, and make the car more "pushy" in low-speed corners. I also do ProSolos in this car, and it maximizes the launch if the camber is minimum. I run 245/35/18 fronts and 285/30/18 rears so there is some understeer built-in as a result of that, but removing all the rear camber and toe makes the car very well balanced.

interesting. i've never run more positive than -1.5 in back. i've got staggered tires, too, but i bought them from a 996, so they're 225/265. how do your tires wear with that little neg in back? the track i go to most often has few transitional turns compared to many steady state sweepers / carousels, so maximizing lateral grip is a must to be fast there. where do you usually drive?

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I could probably get -2.0 if I wanted more negative.

john -

do you have aftermarket toe links? i was aligning my car yesterday and am unable to run less than -2.2 deg camber in back and still meet my toe requirements. at -1.8 in back, i can't get less than 13/16 toe in (the left side is at max out). i do run RoW ride height, but i didn't think that would matter so much....

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I could probably get -2.0 if I wanted more negative.

john -

do you have aftermarket toe links? i was aligning my car yesterday and am unable to run less than -2.2 deg camber in back and still meet my toe requirements. at -1.8 in back, i can't get less than 13/16 toe in (the left side is at max out). i do run RoW ride height, but i didn't think that would matter so much....

No aftermarket toe links. I have to remain stock (no RoW stuff either) for my autocross class. It surprises me that you can't get zero toe with that much negative camber. I cannot believe the RoW lowered you that much. The rear toes in as the suspension drops and obviously camber increases as the suspension drops, but that is a lot. I can't comment on the cause... sorry.

This is an autocross only car, and low-speed handling behavior is important. If I run more rear toe or more rear negative camber, the car becomes pushy at low speeds, so I set it up to be a bit loose at high speeds. Probably if I were doing track work I would want more rear negative camber, and maybe some rear toe. Tire wear is pretty much nonexistent with my setup.

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No aftermarket toe links. I have to remain stock (no RoW stuff either) for my autocross class. It surprises me that you can't get zero toe with that much negative camber. I cannot believe the RoW lowered you that much. The rear toes in as the suspension drops and obviously camber increases as the suspension drops, but that is a lot. I can't comment on the cause... sorry.

This is an autocross only car, and low-speed handling behavior is important. If I run more rear toe or more rear negative camber, the car becomes pushy at low speeds, so I set it up to be a bit loose at high speeds. Probably if I were doing track work I would want more rear negative camber, and maybe some rear toe. Tire wear is pretty much nonexistent with my setup.

that makes sense for an auto-x car. for grins, i took my car to my alignment guy this morning. we put it on the new hunter rack. i set max toe out and then adjusted camber to zero toe. my left wheel requires -2.2 degrees to zero the toe. my right wheel requires -1.9 degrees. up front, if i adjust my strut towers max-out (minimum neg camber), i'm at -1.0 on each side. i can actually go as high as -3.0 deg in back and as high as -1.75 up front. strange. i even loosened all of the left rear suspension components and physically moved the wheel to max toe out. still can't get less than -2.2 deg camber on the left. looks like i'm in the market for some tarrett arms....

i wound up setting the rear at .1 deg total toe in at -2.2 deg camber. the front is now at .2 deg toe out and -1.2 deg camber. it turns out you can move the front towers quite a lot without affecting toe much.

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i can actually go as high as -3.0 deg in back and as high as -1.75 up front. strange. i even loosened all of the left rear suspension components and physically moved the wheel to max toe out. still can't get less than -2.2 deg camber on the left. looks like i'm in the market for some tarrett arms....

i wound up setting the rear at .1 deg total toe in at -2.2 deg camber. the front is now at .2 deg toe out and -1.2 deg camber. it turns out you can move the front towers quite a lot without affecting toe much.

It sounds like your car is abnormally low. For a track car with no rules, you can easily solve the problem.

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It sounds like your car is abnormally low. For a track car with no rules, you can easily solve the problem.

true. my only problems come when trying to conserve tires on the street. for track days, it's nice getting all that static camber.

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A buddy and I just did another M030 install. Three hours start to finish, both ends of the car. I found that the biggest pain in the a$$ in this job is removing and reinstalling the rear axle. So this time, we didn't do it.

We found it to be much quicker and easier to do the rear by disconnecting the rear camber eccentric bolt. If you do this, you don't need to remove the lower ball joint, you don't have to pry the control arm, you don't have to remove the axle and you don't have to remove the brake calipers.

Attached is a pic showing what I mean. I'm sure some of you knew this but nobody ever attached a picture.

Just viewed the IExif Data on your picture....Showed that this was the 7520th picture that you took with your camera. Nice to see i am not the only one snapping away.....

Cheers

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