Jump to content

Server Lease Renewal/Software Licenses

Our yearly server lease, software licenses, as well as hardware operating costs, ARE due Dec 6th, 2021. Our current donations have fallen far short of the funds we need to renew. Please remember the RennTech.org community is Member supported so please consider a donation to help...  THANK YOU!

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Recommended Posts

I've got a 2002 996 cab that has been pretty low maintenance.    I'm 2nd owner and it has about 75K miles, about half of which were logged by me. 

 

With only about 6K miles per year average, It didn't suprise me 2 weeks ago when I had a weak battery (too weak to start).    I swapped it out for a new one from AutoZone, drove it twice, and now 2 weeks later the car is DOA, no power whatsoever.  

 

The only problem I'm aware of is about 10K miles ago the keyless entry quit working, so i've had to lock/unlock manually.    The power locks work from inside, just not from the remote. 

 

It was stored for the last 2 weeks in the garage with the doors locked and top down. 

 

Any idea where to begin finding the drain?    Except for the wheels and tires, it's 100% stock.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin

Do you have a amp meter?

If so, your troubleshooting should begin with the amp meter in series with the battery (battery positive lead -->amp meter --> positive lead from battery). Normal draw for a 996 is about 40-60 ma (no key in the ignition as that activates the airbag circuit and other things).

Once in place note the amp meter reading - remove one fuse at a time and note the change. A few miili-amps is normal anything higher suspect.

If there is little or no change replace the fuse and go on to the next one until you find the circuit with the high current draw. Once you do that report the fuse letter/number back here and we'll suggest what is next for that circuit.

 

BTW... it is normal for the door locks to stop working in as little as 5 days storage (not driven) as the alarm system shuts off non-essential (remote unlocking) features to save battery power.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you don't have a multimeter yet, consider investing in this low DC current amp clamp that measures down to 1mA. You just clamp around the battery cable (or whatever cable you need to measure the current) without the need to disconnect anything. Perfect for measuring current draw and also useful for diagnosing general charging issues.

 

http://www.amazon.com/ESI-687-Amps-Current-Probe/dp/B000W8HD6O/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1411413914&sr=8-8&keywords=low+dc+current+amp+clamp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Hey, I'm back!      My gremlin went away for awhile, but now it's back with a vengeance.      The car has been parked since the new year, so I decided to fire it up and stir the oil, etc.        The car was completely dead.   Completely.      So I took and hooked a battery up to the fuse panel jumper and door post and the alarm goes off.   Problem is that neither key in the door or ignition will stop the alarm.    The hood openers don't pop and I get nothing on the dash, just an alarm!

 

Suggestions?

Edited by DiscobayJoe
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Hey, I'm back!      My gremlin went away for awhile, but now it's back with a vengeance.      The car has been parked since the new year, so I decided to fire it up and stir the oil, etc.        The car was completely dead.   Completely.      So I took and hooked a battery up to the fuse panel jumper and door post and the alarm goes off.   Problem is that neither key in the door or ignition will stop the alarm.    The hood openers don't pop and I get nothing on the dash, just an alarm!

 

Suggestions?

 

Common response of these cars to very low battery voltages is for the alarm to sound when auxiliary power is applied.  If you have access to a battery maintainer with a lighter plug, hook it up to the car and let it run for a bit until the battery builds up enough to allow you to open the hood and pull the battery out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

problem is my batterymindr won't charge as it doesn't detect any voltage (it actually says polarity reversal) and when I hook up a battery to jump it the alarm just goes off never ending.   

 

There is a reason for that, your dead or near dead battery is absorbing the current so fast, the alarm never sees it and goes off.  You are going to have to live with the alarm sound until the power level in the battery builds up, or resort to using the manual emergency cable to release the front hood so you can either charge up (yes, the alarm will sound unless you disconnect the battery) or replace the battery entirely.  And when you install a new battery, the alarm may sound yet again, but will respond to being reset by the remote.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I left a trickle charger on it for 2 days.   After the alarm runs for 2 cycles of 3 minutes the alarm stops.      It still doesn't have enough juice to let me open the hood. 

 

Can you get to the hood manual release without destroying anything?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I left a trickle charger on it for 2 days.   After the alarm runs for 2 cycles of 3 minutes the alarm stops.      It still doesn't have enough juice to let me open the hood. 

 

Can you get to the hood manual release without destroying anything?

 

Yes.  There should be a DIY on how to access it in the archives.  It is behind the front bumper cover  The cable is on the right hand (US driver's) side, the forward top portion. You have to pull hard on it to release the latch. The cable is exactly the one on the picture (arrow) but further aft because now the picture show the front bumper cover removed:

 

Capture d’écran 2013-01-07 à 14.47.03.jpeg 627728d1335538232-manual-hood-release-on 627729d1335538232-manual-hood-release-on

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll throw this in for good measure (all the advice about is good as well).  I had persistent battery problems on my 2004 996 C4S for about 2 years.  I bought a Battery Minder, checked for current draws, etc -- and still had problems.  In the end I left it with my favorite mechanic for about a week and he figured out that the alternator was weak, and the battery wasn't fully charging when I drove it.  He replaced that and all my problems went away.

 

Persistent under-charging will damage your battery, and I went through three in a three-year period.  This may or may not be what is going on with you.

Edited by gnetwerker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

 

I left a trickle charger on it for 2 days.   After the alarm runs for 2 cycles of 3 minutes the alarm stops.      It still doesn't have enough juice to let me open the hood. 

 

Can you get to the hood manual release without destroying anything?

 

Yes.  There should be a DIY on how to access it in the archives.  It is behind the front bumper cover  The cable is on the right hand (US driver's) side, the forward top portion. You have to pull hard on it to release the latch. The cable is exactly the one on the picture (arrow) but further aft because now the picture show the front bumper cover removed:

 

Capture d’écran 2013-01-07 à 14.47.03.jpeg 627728d1335538232-manual-hood-release-on 627729d1335538232-manual-hood-release-on

 

Did they move the emergency cable for the 2002 model year? My front cable was (as shown in owner's manual) forward of the passenger side door hinge area (in effect, under the right headlight unit), in the right fender. One of the first tips I took from RennTech was to relocate the loop end so that it could be retrieved from behind the tow hook hole bumper plug. That way, I could open my hood even with the rest of the car completely locked up ... and retrieve a key I kept in the trunk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.