Jump to content

The RennTech.org community is Member supported!  Please consider an ANNUAL donation to help keep this site operating.
Click here to Donate

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Recommended Posts

My CS 04 Coolant warning came on so i ran home.  When i came home i found to my suprise beige/ brown milkshake instead of the water i had put in. 

Stuff is really thick. If it were a bad gasket or cracked engine i would see some drops of oil i think. This can only be oil cooler i suppose. So i started looking on the forum for a diy or someone else who has ran into this problem but it seems this has never happened to anyone. So my question, is this oil cooler that went bad or could it be something else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Moderators

My CS 04 Coolant warning came on so i ran home.  When i came home i found to my suprise beige/ brown milkshake instead of the water i had put in. 

Stuff is really thick. If it were a bad gasket or cracked engine i would see some drops of oil i think. This can only be oil cooler i suppose. So i started looking on the forum for a diy or someone else who has ran into this problem but it seems this has never happened to anyone. So my question, is this oil cooler that went bad or could it be something else.

 

It can be an oil cooler, but often is not.  Do not run or drive the vehicle, get it on a flatbed into the shop ASAP. Some diagnostic test (leak down, etc.) are needed that most DIY are not prepared to handle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately this has happened before:

 

http://rennlist.com/forums/porsche-cayenne-forum/522849-help-please-2004-cayenne-s-with-dead-engine-coolant-in-the-oil.html

 

My 03 CTT had this issue and it was a head gasket, but others in my club have as well and in 2 of the 3 it was "buy a new car time" because of the cost of repair. You really need a leak down test done by a knowledgable mechanic for proper diagnosis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First: There is no water in the engine oil. Oil level did drop to a little below minimum. Coolant did not boil. I'm saying this because too much oil has gone in the coolant too fast for it to be a head gasket or a crack. I really want to know what gone wrong and i want to do it myself. If the oil cooler has gone bad i should be able to see what has gone wrong by taking it of right? A leak down test is not somthing a DIYer needs a mechanic for, google will do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine was a head gasket. Coolant never boiled.

 

It's a bit strange though that your "coolant warning came on" as in my experience this is an indicator of coolant level being low. If so, where'd it go? Ground? Engine - oil? And, you have oil in the coolant.....

 

So complete a leak down test, but to be very frank running a leak down test is the easy part, correctly diagnosing the issue on a Cayenne V8 is a little more of an art. Check your compression as well.

 

Also, you may think about making a donation to this forum.

 

Regards,

Edited by Pkscheldt
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My CS 04 Coolant warning came on so i ran home.  When i came home i found to my suprise beige/ brown milkshake instead of the water i had put in. 

Stuff is really thick. If it were a bad gasket or cracked engine i would see some drops of oil i think. This can only be oil cooler i suppose. So i started looking on the forum for a diy or someone else who has ran into this problem but it seems this has never happened to anyone. So my question, is this oil cooler that went bad or could it be something else.

 

 

My CS 04 Coolant warning came on so i ran home.  When i came home i found to my suprise beige/ brown milkshake instead of the water i had put in. 

Stuff is really thick. If it were a bad gasket or cracked engine i would see some drops of oil i think. This can only be oil cooler i suppose. So i started looking on the forum for a diy or someone else who has ran into this problem but it seems this has never happened to anyone. So my question, is this oil cooler that went bad or could it be something else.

 

It can be an oil cooler, but often is not.  Do not run or drive the vehicle, get it on a flatbed into the shop ASAP. Some diagnostic test (leak down, etc.) are needed that most DIY are not prepared to handle.

 

 

Mine was a head gasket. Coolant never boiled.

 

It's a bit strange though that your "coolant warning came on" as in my experience this is an indicator of coolant level being low. If so, where'd it go? Ground? Engine - oil? And, you have oil in the coolant.....

 

So complete a leak down test, but to be very frank running a leak down test is the easy part, correctly diagnosing the issue on a Cayenne V8 is a little more of an art. Check your compression as well.

 

Also, you may think about making a donation to this forum.

 

Regards,

 

Rik881,

 

You have asked for advise and not taken it from two people that have first hand experience with this issue. More then likely you have a blown head gasket and or cracked head /block. The beige/brown milkshake that you have described is the first telltale signs of that kind of issue. As a diagnostic tech you need to find the root cause. This can not be properly done by a DIYer. If you must prove to yourself what all of us are saying this is one option below. I hope this will get you to a professional to properly diagnose your issue.

 

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/lil-75500?seid=srese1&gclid=CMmE4ve3pcMCFYhbfgod350ApA

Edited by binger
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just questioning the advice because i really think and hope the oil cooler went bad. Car stood for a long while and i have just changed oil few 100 miles ago. There is no water in my engine oil as i said. I am so stubborn because i saw this happen to older Toyota's. I live in a small country with no professional Porsche mechanics. I could order the leak down test but it would take like 2 or 3 weeks to arrive. That is why i want to take of the oil cooler.  

 

Worst case scenario would be oil mixing with coolant again. Or am i missing something?

 

To me the point of a car forum is to not bring your car to the mechanic. What is wrong with a little trial and error.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Leak down is always preferable.  As I have no experience with the unit you posted, I cannot speak to its accuracy.  You also need to make sure your air compressor has sufficient output in both PSIG and CFM to correctly operate any leak down unit you might choose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a leak down test. I took out all spark plugs and the intake. I don't seem to have the right socket for the crankshaft. Anybody knows which size i need? I am trying to do it without taking out the bumper and cooling fan. I managed to test one cilinder so far and that one is fine as you can see in the picture i added.

 

I did by the way drop the coolant which seemed very clean to my suprise. Only the last bit was dirty. 

post-97468-0-51486000-1421892975_thumb.j

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I bought a leak down test. I took out all spark plugs and the intake. I don't seem to have the right socket for the crankshaft. Anybody knows which size i need? I am trying to do it without taking out the bumper and cooling fan. I managed to test one cilinder so far and that one is fine as you can see in the picture i added.

 

I did by the way drop the coolant which seemed very clean to my suprise. Only the last bit was dirty. 

 

If I am reading that gauge set correctly, you are seeing very low leak loss, but at about 10 PSIG.  You should be reading the leak percentage are much higher pressures (90-100 PSIG air).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, according to the user manual http://www.northernautoparts.com/files/manuals/performance_tool/W89729_Manual.pdf

 

I think as long as you follow the following steps, set the air compressor regulator to 50-100PSI, and the tester works properly, then I think only the reading on the upper gauge (as % in your photo) matters. It's not clear what the lower gauge of 10PSIG represents. I think there's where the confusion comes from.

 

"6.  Set the air compressor’s regulator to 7psi to 100psi. Never operate tool with more than
 100psi inlet pressure or damage to the tool can result.
7. Turn the regulator knob clockwise until the cylinder leakage gauge reads “0” at the
 end of the yellow band"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

No you are wrong, the lower the better, thi is under 10 percent so it's fine. Now up to the next one.

 

If the air inlet pressure to the tool is really at 10 psig (or less), I would not trust the results, regardless of how good they are.  Higher cylinder pressures will show the real leakage rates, not lower.

 

What is the compressor line air pressure going to the tool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.