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Cloudsurfer

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Everything posted by Cloudsurfer

  1. I wouldn't worry tooooooo much about going from one version of the same company's snow to the newer version replacement, however, I would be a bit concerned about remaining tread depth. If your M3's are getting thin, I certainly wouldn't mix them with a new tire on the other axle.
  2. Should be able to just get a 24mm box end wrench in there......
  3. I've been running the 1042XP, and after cutting open a few of them, they are an excellent filter.
  4. Unless you'd like to go buy yourself a new center diff once you get from point A to point B, you need to put the car on a trailer or flat bed it....
  5. They were not so wrong with the initial double-row (996-1) and then decided to make it worse or very wrong with the single row (996-2). Capitalizing on both of these experiences; ie, being so-so wrong (D-Row) and then very wrong (S-Row), they then decided to be not so wrong with the larger S-Row (05 to 08 997); ie, not quite there, until 09 when they got rid of the IMS. It is what made the Porsche engineers go to a S-Row from a D-Row in 2001 that really leaves me perplexed!? What were they thinking ...? Hence so far, dumb and happy with a D-Row! The switch to a single row was a result of moving to Variocam +. This necessitated a slightly longer IM shaft, hence the smaller bearing. While these cars have the newer vane cell type VarioCam, it is NOT VarioCam Plus (which features valve lift control in addition to valve timing adjustment).
  6. This is somewhat of a loaded question, with a couple different ways of looking at it. I generally subscribe to the notion that all season tires are "no season tires," as you just wind up with a tire that excels at nothing. If it's winter traction, both in the cold AND snow, a dedicated winter tire is worlds ahead in terms of grip. If it's winter traction on dry roads in the cold, a summer tire is not a good choice here. Below about 40 degrees you're just never going to get enough heat into a summer compound tire, and as the rubber is just too hard, traction suffers greatly. If you run into any moisture on the road, but especially actual snow, on summer tires, it's downright scary. Think 200 foot stops from 30 MPH. Winter tires are not just for driving in the snow. Performance oriented winter tires are pretty **** decent on a cold, dry road, as their compounds are designed to work when cold. A performance all season tire isn't bad on cold, dry roads, and will feel much better on a day where it warms to 60 degrees, where even the performance winter tire starts getting a bit mushy, but if you run into any snow, are at a pretty big deficit compared to the real winter tire. The LM-60 is quite good, but my favorite performance winter tire is the Dunlop Winter Sport M3 (which just recently become the M4). You might consider the Continental DWS, which is a performance all season, if you can limit your driving only to colder temps but avoid driving in a snowstorm.
  7. Those are the AC lines... I find it hard to believe that either of them are "collapsed," more likely bent/ dented/ beat up. Unless it's completely crushed, and doesn't leak, I wouldn't worry tooooooo much...
  8. Again, the "Pelican Option" is a single row only steel bearing, basically the weakest known design of any used. If you have a dual row car, you would actually be replacing the strongest of the factory designs with one the weakest. You would be better off leaving the factory bearing in there and just removing the rear seal so it can get some oil. If you had a single row car, you would be replacing a questionable design with another questionable design, all to save a few bucks. Agree 100%. While the LN bearing isn't cheap, and I'm sure Charles and the gang are making a nice profit off each one, the R&D has been done, and it's been field proven. If someone wants to take the gamble to save $400 on this job, be my guest, but I don't think you're going to find much sympathy on this board when your cheaper option fails and you're looking for a new motor.
  9. Sounds like hydrolock.... oil certainly could have come from a failing cylinder.....
  10. They'll be a hair taller, which shouldn't cause any fitment issues, but unless you correspondingly go up in the front as well, I might worry about the speed sensor inputs being different and pissing off the ABS/ PSM. It goes without saying that you'll also incur some speedo error.
  11. There's plenty of difference when you add an extra 400cc and bump compression an extra point and clean up the heads. Like I said, my 3.8 made right around 400HP. It's also infinitely more reliable than any of the stock motors are. Also in agreement, the air filter and other bolt ons aren't worth much. These cars can take some extra power, but you also have to be smart about it. I wouldn't launch any of these cars- bone stock or modified- as if that's what you want to do, you bought the wrong car. However, feeding in an extra 75hp in third gear smoothly isn't going to hurt anything. Thankfully, these cars already have plenty of braking capacity (with good pads), and if you've gone this far with building a motor, it's safe to assume you've already upgraded the suspension.
  12. Step 1: Acquire a massive amount of patience. Step 2: When I do them, I pull the temp sensor off the right intake manifold, and use a swivel socket on an extension to get to the bolt. Then, use a magnet to hold the bolt up out of the spacer, so you can slide the compressor out. It's an incredibly frustrating job, but doable.
  13. It doesn't work like that, i.e. 350 + 30 + 23 + 28= 431. First of all, a K&N filter is not worth anything, and I would never run one on any car with a MAF. The IPD plenum helps, but it's not 28 ponies of help. Likewise, exhaust does not get you a 30 HP gain. My LN sleeved 3.8 at 12.5:1 compression with forged everything, ported and cleaned up heads, and headers/ no cats/ free exhaust did 330 at the wheels, which is right about 390-400 at the crank. There are gains to be had on a built motor with custom software. I highly doubt you will be making 430 with your setup.
  14. +1 for WeVo or equivalent. For the tranny, if your stock mount is still good, use some Urethane to beef it up (3M Window Weld is great). Otherwise, replacement is in order (which is NOT a fun job).
  15. Well, turns out that new this clutch was .350", and I now have about .338"- .340", so it's def good to go for another round :)
  16. So I have the gearbox off this car, and thought I'd pull the pressure plate and take a look at the clutch disc. It's a SPEC Stage 2. Has about 10,000-12,000 miles. There's a tiny bit of wear evident, but I'm inclined to assume that this will run just fine for a good long time, and it's not worth replacing. I haven't mic'd it, but it looks like barely any wear. Thoughts?
  17. Fully agree. I'm to the point where I don't buy anything online without paying with a credit card, for that exact reason. In terms of usefulness, if it will handle 996 and 997, and maybe a Cayenne if I ever pick one up, that's fine (for now, who knows what I'll want/ need in 5 years).
  18. Scares the crap out of me too.... I know Porsche only leased PIWIS testers, but then I know some shops who have "standalone" units running on laptops, that work. Protomotive will sell you one for $5k, which, while not cheap, is guaranteed to work.
  19. So..... is this remotely legit, or just more Chinese knockoff junk...... http://www.vtoolshop.com/obd-code-scanners-porsche-piwis-tester-kts520_p169.html
  20. You've got to be kidding me. "IMS Guardian?" How exactly is this supposed to work? Let's see: Idea #1: "Chip light." Two electrodes spaced apart, with a field on them. When enough metal in the oil closes the circuit, you know you've got trouble. Problem is, by the time you have enough metal to throw a chip light, you shut down the engine and overhaul it, so you didn't really save anything, it's just telling you that you're screwed (they're very helpful in aircraft engines, as if you throw a chip light, you want to shut down and secure the failing engine BEFORE it blows up, not so much the same level of importance on a car). Idea #2: Timing deviation. You can't watch the timing deviation, as by the time that shifts, it's certainly too late. Idea #3: Vibration analysis. You might, hypothetically (and I emphasize, hypothetically) be able to do vibration analysis. This is a common way of detecting problems in turbine engines during routine maintenance, and it works EXTREMELY well. However, I can assure you that if this technology were to be adapted to an automotive, piston engine, only a manufacturer would have the time and funds to get a large enough amount of data to plot to have any sort of meaningful use. Idea #4. Bearing temperature. See "chip light," above. By the time this thing flashes, it's likely too late, as you've already sent metal on a round trip tour through the engine. There is absolutely no denying that that the M96 engine suffers several engineers flaws, the largest being the IMS issue. The factory bearing is known to be junk, while the LN unit is light years ahead. Does it 100% remove the risk? Of course not, but as others have said, you'd sleep much sounder knowing that it's been done.
  21. You've got to be kidding me. "IMS Guardian?" How exactly is this supposed to work? You can't watch the timing deviation, as by the time that shifts, it's certainly too late. You might, hypothetically (and I emphasize, hypothetically) be able to do vibration analysis, however, as a pilot who is very well versed in the vibration analysis that turbine engines undergo as part of routine maintenance, I can assure you that if this technology were to be adapted to an automotive, piston engine, only a manufacturer would have the time and funds to get a large enough amount of data to plot to have any sort of meaningful use. There is absolutely no denying that that the M96 engine suffers several engineers flaws, the largest being the IMS issue. The factory bearing is known to be junk, while the LN unit is light years ahead. Does it 100% remove the risk? Of course not, but as others have said, you'd sleep much sounder knowing that it's been done. As to the added amount of labor on a tip, I don't know if it's the case on a C2 tip, but I helped a friend do a C4 tip, and we have to drop the engine engine/ gearbox as a unit from the car and then separate on the shop floor, so it may be more than a few hours more.
  22. Common problem. You could sand through the clear, and re-clear them. Depending upon how many miles are on the calipers, and how the car's been used, you might consider rebuilding the calipers, at which point you can have the calipers powder coated.
  23. This entire thing has "bad idea" written all over it. You have no idea if the engine jumped time, no idea if you have bent valves, no idea how much metal has been sent around the engine, and you want to stuff a new IMS bearing into a damaged IMS shaft? As others here who are knowledgeable have stated, all of this is especially pointless if you haven't even borescoped each cylinder.
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