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JFP in PA

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Everything posted by JFP in PA

  1. Let's see; $250 for the tool, then $1300 for the Porsche specific add on; vs. $287 for the Durametric "Enthusiast" or $735 for the "Pro" version. Kind of seems obvious.......
  2. dumb question here... what exactly is the rotating assembly... is that not on the flywheel... is it a separate component? as for the X51 baffled pan.. its does provide *some* benefit that's for sure... but I definitely agree that it is only the 1st (and IMO necessary step) in upgrading the oiling system... I'm curious if there are folks who have done both X51 AND deep sump pan (which holds about 1/2 quart extra only) that have seen more stable pressures in corners where oil pressure was previously unstable. I know of an outfitter here in Canada that makes a sump kit that holds a *complete
  3. so unless you take apart your engine to balance all the above parts *with* the new LWFW your saying don't do it? I would not. But everyone must weigh the risks and make their own decision. ok... thx for clarifying... that's why lots of the engines that have this mod added eventually give out early.. but not all though... its a crapshoot +1 on Loren's comments. This is what was left of a factory X51 motor running a lightweight flywheel.............
  4. We have several customer's running the Accusump system, some which we installed. Is there something specific you want to know?
  5. dumb question here... what exactly is the rotating assembly... is that not on the flywheel... is it a separate component? as for the X51 baffled pan.. its does provide *some* benefit that's for sure... but I definitely agree that it is only the 1st (and IMO necessary step) in upgrading the oiling system... I'm curious if there are folks who have done both X51 AND deep sump pan (which holds about 1/2 quart extra only) that have seen more stable pressures in corners where oil pressure was previously unstable. I know of an outfitter here in Canada that makes a sump kit that holds a *complete
  6. I have, and I would definitely recommend against using a light weight single mass flywheel unless the rotating assembly, and the flywheel, are fully balanced as a unit before the engine is assembled. A lot of people seem to think that they can simply slap on an X51 sump cover and all is well, when the reality is that the sump cover is probably the least important component in the upgrade.
  7. There is no reason the LN pan spacer would not fit, only question is does the pickup spacer lower the pickup enough to get it near the sump floor. As for the X51 package, just adding the sump will do little other than increase the sump’s holding capacity slightly. The full X51 added an additional scavenger pump in the heads and a “northwest passage” oil line to get the oil from the extra pump back to the sump quicker, which is a major plus. Someone is making a similar kit to retrofit non X51 engines, but it requires removing and machining the cam cover for the bypass line, which can be tric
  8. You normally would need to obtain commerical battery acid, which is a soultion of around 30% H2SO4 in distilled water.
  9. More than likely, it was not stolen, but simply came loose and fell off without anyone noticing it was gone................
  10. For future reference, you may want to look at 3M automotive "Scotch Loks". They are gel filled, self stripping crimp connectors that are water proof and made for automotive applications. Come in a variety of sizes, we use them on (and under) cars all the time, never had one come back with a bad connection.
  11. E-scan is an interesting device, but unfortunately cost more than the Durametric Pro system, and has less diagnostics functions than the Durametric when connected to a Porsche (at least the last time I looked at it).
  12. A leak down test will often catch very small leaks caused by minute head or block cracks as well as head gasket failures that get missed or classified as cylinder to cylinder variations in a compression test routine. Yes it costs more, but it gives more definitive information.
  13. Kind of thought that would be the situation; in any case, it still is not that bad a project.
  14. The only way to know what you are dealing with is to check the engine out (run a leak down test, pressure test the cooling system, pull the oil filter and cut it open, drop the sump cover, etc.). These engines do not like being hot, tend to start cracking heads, and the early blocks had other issues as well.
  15. Pulling the pump and putting it back is often false economy; considering the effort and parts costs involved, and the fact these pump go south without much warning, it simply does not make sense. That is also why we never reuse coolant, even when it looks good. Do it right and you generally only do it once……….
  16. Any debris in the coolant is reason for some concern; contamination can lead to a premature death of the coolant. Normally, there should be no sealant or other crud in the system as none is used in the original assembly, or should be used if the thermostat or pump is changed out. One potential source for black flakes in the system is from the pump itself, which uses a black plastic impeller that is well known for breaking up in use. Impeller failure has led to other issues as the debris can block water passages and cause hot spots to form, which can lead to issues like cracked cylinder hea
  17. OEM Litronics installations have two features that cannot be retrofitted, even using the OEM “kit”. The factory units have sensors on the chassis that adjust the lights angle to prevent glare to oncoming drivers (such as when cresting a hill), and the factory units are capable of being fault scanned by a PST II or PIWIS.
  18. You do come up with interesting problems…………… As I believe your car is a 2003, I think the news is bad: The ABS wiring circuit diagram does not show any disconnects other than the ones near the actual wheel speed sensors. Some of the earlier years had a disconnect just inside the trunk area, but that seems to have disappeared in the later models like yours. You may want to do some exploring, as I have found the connection locations in these diagrams to not always be completely accurate. In any case, the wiring is nothing special, so you can do some splicing to get back on the road.
  19. Not sure the later airbag is compatible with the earlier system.
  20. I have to agree with Loren on this; and because it gets into a questionable definition of "better". In general, just about any new plug is going to be "better" than one with a lot of miles on it, simply because it is new (after all, these are consumable items) . I believe if you dyno tested several brands of new plugs of the same heat range; any differences would be more experimental error rather than actual gains. The more appropriate question is which plug is doing "better" after a ton of miles, and this is where the incredible toughness of Iridium comes in. After 30-40 thousand miles, t
  21. Fortunately, the tensioner is pretty sturdy and does not crap out very often; usually, if it has to be accessed, it is because someone screwed up the tensioner pulley mounting bolt, requiring the replacement of the arm. Then the fun begins…….. I also would not go the recommended distance on the serpentine belt; it is a relatively inexpensive item, but can leave you stranded on the side of the road, if not the new owner of a boat anchor where your engine used to sit. I would also recommend keeping the old belt in the car as an emergency spare due to the fact that many shops do not carry
  22. If you need to replace the tensioner itself (#2 in the PDF), you are in for a fun project as everything short of the kitchen sink is in the way....................
  23. I would say "yes", although I'm sure others would disagree. Iridium is the hardest material with high current conductance properties available in spark plug at this time, so it should last the longest. We have used both NGK and Denso's in both normally aspirated and turbo cars, and while both worked well, I think the Denso's are a bit better.
  24. Gotta ask: Are you sure your DME and the engine are compatible? The later engines use a somewhat different VarioCam system and the DME's for one are not directly compatible with the other.................you note is was "reprogrammed", but are you sure it is correct?
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