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JFP in PA

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Everything posted by JFP in PA

  1. I'd start with a check of the battery and alternator; voltage swings often cause both the ABS and PSM MIL's to trigger. A load test of the battery and alternator will tell you if they are involved; beyond that, I would agree with Loren, get it scanned for active and pending codes.................
  2. Ummmmmmmmmmm……guys, you do realize that there is an switched power supply for the OEM cell phone (unused on most cars) that is just laying at the bottom of the center console section of the dash (just pop off the passenger side center kick panel, and there it is…) which is perfect for this………
  3. Actually, this a more complicated subject than you might imagine……. Excellence magazine recently ran an interesting article on why you really should not disconnect the battery without an alternative supply source connected, such as a battery maintainer that has this capability (not all do, most actually stop the current as soon as it sense the battery disconnect such as during a battery replacement). Problems caused differ with model and year, but range from the annoying, such as the DME resetting and causing rough idle and poor running until it relearns; to real head aches like having the gas gauge lose calibration, which requires a PIWIS and draining the tank to reset……………
  4. The IMS issue is anything but "propaganda"………… All M96 engine versions, right up to the last ones made, are at some level of risk of the IMS failing; no exceptions. If your engine carries an intermediate shaft, the rear bearing can (and do) fail. The pre 2006 units can be easily retrofitted with the LN upgrade, the later units have a bearing that is larger than the case opening, and requires total disassembly of the engine to retrofit. As for using the VIN to determine which IMS version is in the car, that has proven to not always be accurate; the only proven method of determining which IMS is in a given car is to pull the gear box and look at it………
  5. You are probably no going to like it, but IMHO, the best place to introduce BG44K or Seafoam is into the nearest trash can. Both of these products have chemical make ups very similar to ladies nail polish remover; hardly something you would want to pour into a decent engine..................
  6. You are going to need access to either a low lift transmission jack (rental or Harbor Freight), or a transmission jack adpator for a floor jack; that Tip is a lot heavier than it looks and you don't want to drop it...........
  7. Pelican Parts website has a tutorial for changing the water pump and thermostat, with pictures, which should be helpful, just leave out the bits about the water pump. Pedro’s Garage site has a good one as well. If needs be, one of the Bentley manuals for the Boxster may come in handy as well. You are going to need two gallons of Porsche’s antifreeze concentrate, two gallons of distilled water (pre mix them outside the car first), some anti-seize for the coolant drain plug, plus a new washer for it (dealer item for a few cents), an inch pound torque wrench for the stat housing, a new stat housing gasket (metal, do not reuse), and a very large container to drain your coolant into, then you should be set. Be sure to “burp” the system after refilling if you do not have access to a vacuum filling tool……….
  8. Depending upon the ambient conditions, with a 160F stat in your M96 and in “steady state” driving (open road, constant speed); you will be running in the mid 170’s to perhaps low 180’s, so your concerns about it being too cool are unfounded. Remember that the stat controls the minimum operating temperature, thereby lowering the steady state temp. With the 160 stat in place, in heavy traffic you will still heat up enough for the fans to kick in, but when you get moving again the temp will drop back to a lower steady state condition. Two things to also consider; Porsche uses a 160 stat in some their high end engines from the factory, and your OEM stat starts to open in the low 180’s, but is not fully open until well over 200F (the dash gauges in these cars are both inaccurate and non-linear), and you are probably running in the 210F and up range at steady state currently.
  9. Before installing a one piece flywheel, you need to recognize why the OEM unit is two pieces (dual mass). These engines are short on torsional dampening, most OEM’s use a large mass dampener on the front of the crank to absorb these stresses, Porsche moved it to the flywheel, where in combination with the sprung disc it absorbs drive line shocks, and the flywheel provides torsional relief for the crank and rotating assembly. Without the dual mass flywheel, you run a significant risk of crankshaft cracking or failure as there is now nothing to dampen those stresses. We have seen more than one crank failure for this exact reason. A one piece light weight flywheel can be used if the engine is disassembled and fully harmonically balanced (which the OEM unit is not), but that is obviously a big buck approach to getting quicker RPM response……
  10. That is your problem, the two O2 sensors are looking for the differential change the cat brings, and not seeing it, hence the "Three way catalyst conversion too low" code....... It may be possible to defeat this by having a PIWIS remap your DME to the RoW emissions spec (North American cars are the only ones running four O2 sensors [one before and one after the cat on each side], so the RoW map ignores the second sensor, ending the code). You can still put the O2 sensors through their paces with a multi meter to assure yourself they are working, but I'd bet they are fine as this code is specific to the cat working, which implies the sensors are fine............
  11. Simple: ask them if the have the RMS tool 9699 and the 9699/2 insert guide, and how many of the 997.101.212.00 seals they have installed. If they don't have it, or worse yet don't know what you are talking about, be very afraid.................
  12. P0420 is “TWC conversion too low” on bank 1-3. It is not an O2 sensor per se (assuming they both pass their own diagnostics), it is more likely the cat itself. OBD II manual says to clear it and see if it returns, if does, you need a new cat on that side………….
  13. Let's put it this way, both my cars have the spin on adaptor, as do many of my customers; some of these cars have been running it for a couple of years. As I offer all my customers UoA's as part of their service package, we have collected a lot of oil data running the adaptors. We also cut open all oil filters, spin on and OEM style, to check for debris. To date, I have seen no problems with either the visual inspection or the UoA's; and some of these cars really get run hard. As the cars with the adaptors have no shown any issues, it would appear that the OEM by-pass really doesn't do much of anything.................
  14. This is not a good sign; the Y tube or the tank would leak onto the garage floor, yours sounds like it is not, and I am assuming it is not in the oil either. Most common faults for this are head gaskets, or a cracked head (not that uncommon). Testing would involve pressure testing the cooling system, and doing a “leak down” test on each cylinder to pin point where it is. In any case, the M96 will most likely need to come apart…………..
  15. You need to do a search.............this has be covered numerous times. Yes, the spin on is a good idea, and the lack of a by-pass valve is not an issue as by the time the OEM style cartridge filter plugs up enough for it to open, the engine is toast any way.............
  16. And ususally the one gets robbed.............and complains that the alarm doesn't work...................:rolleyes:
  17. Actually, it does; the compartment cannot be locked unless it is first closed....................
  18. The purge valve is on the left side of the engine, under the intake manifold.................
  19. I think that anyone moving away from normally aspirated versions of these engines is asking for trouble, regardless of the method.....................
  20. So the contents of the arm rest do not get looted with the car is parked with the top down.................
  21. Take a look at Bridgestone's new Pole Position 960, a true all season tire with great grip wet or dry, and are very quiet as well. Have two sets on family cars, very pleased with the handling/bad weather performance balance......................
  22. If you have air trapped in the system, either from replacing the oil cooler, or from the dumping itself, you will continue to have issues until you get the air out.......
  23. The Snap-On unit in my post above is a "stubby" that will fit, most Snap-On dealers carry them at about $7.50..............
  24. First of all, you really do not need to run the pump unless you have gotten air into the system, most delaerships do not use the manual's recommendations unless there is a problem........
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