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Porsche (unfindable) extra special tool 9599


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Some of your have followed my quest for info about dropping the engine and doing a chain tensioner swap/upgrade/replacement (986 forum). I have seen references to the Porsche factory chain tensioner tool 9599 which is apparently quite expensive and, if I understand correctly, unnecessary according to Wayne Dempster's book: "If you do not have this extremely expensive tool (upper right inset of Figure 24), you can tighten up the tension on the chain using the regular chain tensioner. Reinstall the tensioner completely into the bottom of the case."
So, do I do, or do I don't need this? If you have any experience with this please let me know. confused.gif

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Some of your have followed my quest for info about dropping the engine and doing a chain tensioner swap/upgrade/replacement (986 forum). I have seen references to the Porsche factory chain tensioner tool 9599 which is apparently quite expensive and, if I understand correctly, unnecessary according to Wayne Dempster's book: "If you do not have this extremely expensive tool (upper right inset of Figure 24), you can tighten up the tension on the chain using the regular chain tensioner. Reinstall the tensioner completely into the bottom of the case."

So, do I do, or do I don't need this? If you have any experience with this please let me know. confused.gif

If you are just replacing the hydraulic tensioners, the tool(s) is not necssary; start by first running your cam deviation values with the Durametric system for refference, then just lock the engine at TDC, lock the cams, and you are set to swap out the tensioners. When done, recheck the cam deviation values to be sure nothing moved.

If you are going deeper (e,g,: removing the chains, etc.) you need some addtional tooling to hold the cams in place while the cam covers are off. Once the parts swap out was done, you would then need the 9599 during the process of retiming the cams to properly tension the paddles and chains while setting the timing.

You should also be aware that if you are just changing out the hydraulic chain tensioner units, you do not need to drop the engine.

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Some of your have followed my quest for info about dropping the engine and doing a chain tensioner swap/upgrade/replacement (986 forum). I have seen references to the Porsche factory chain tensioner tool 9599 which is apparently quite expensive and, if I understand correctly, unnecessary according to Wayne Dempster's book: "If you do not have this extremely expensive tool (upper right inset of Figure 24), you can tighten up the tension on the chain using the regular chain tensioner. Reinstall the tensioner completely into the bottom of the case."

So, do I do, or do I don't need this? If you have any experience with this please let me know. confused.gif

If you are just replacing the hydraulic tensioners, the tool(s) is not necssary; start by first running your cam deviation values with the Durametric system for refference, then just lock the engine at TDC, lock the cams, and you are set to swap out the tensioners. When done, recheck the cam deviation values to be sure nothing moved.

If you are going deeper (e,g,: removing the chains, etc.) you need some addtional tooling to hold the cams in place while the cam covers are off. Once the parts swap out was done, you would then need the 9599 during the process of retiming the cams to properly tension the paddles and chains while setting the timing.

You should also be aware that if you are just changing out the hydraulic chain tensioner units, you do not need to drop the engine.

At the moment my cam deviation values are about 0.35 and -9.35. I would like to start by changing the chain rails (pads). If I can do this without dropping the engine, then I could easily check to see if this fixes the problem. I just figured that this would be a real birch to do with the engine still stuffed up in there. Shouldn't I necessarily replace the chains though?

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Some of your have followed my quest for info about dropping the engine and doing a chain tensioner swap/upgrade/replacement (986 forum). I have seen references to the Porsche factory chain tensioner tool 9599 which is apparently quite expensive and, if I understand correctly, unnecessary according to Wayne Dempster's book: "If you do not have this extremely expensive tool (upper right inset of Figure 24), you can tighten up the tension on the chain using the regular chain tensioner. Reinstall the tensioner completely into the bottom of the case."

So, do I do, or do I don't need this? If you have any experience with this please let me know. confused.gif

If you are just replacing the hydraulic tensioners, the tool(s) is not necssary; start by first running your cam deviation values with the Durametric system for refference, then just lock the engine at TDC, lock the cams, and you are set to swap out the tensioners. When done, recheck the cam deviation values to be sure nothing moved.

If you are going deeper (e,g,: removing the chains, etc.) you need some addtional tooling to hold the cams in place while the cam covers are off. Once the parts swap out was done, you would then need the 9599 during the process of retiming the cams to properly tension the paddles and chains while setting the timing.

You should also be aware that if you are just changing out the hydraulic chain tensioner units, you do not need to drop the engine.

At the moment my cam deviation values are about 0.35 and -9.35. I would like to start by changing the chain rails (pads). If I can do this without dropping the engine, then I could easily check to see if this fixes the problem. I just figured that this would be a real birch to do with the engine still stuffed up in there. Shouldn't I necessarily replace the chains though?

That -9.35 is troublesome. As your original post only mentioned the tensioners, I did not know how deep you were planning to go. You can do all four tensioners with the engine in the car, but if you intend to do the chain paddles it would be quicker with the engine out, and there is no way to do the chains without pulling the engine as you are now into splitting the cases.

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Some of your have followed my quest for info about dropping the engine and doing a chain tensioner swap/upgrade/replacement (986 forum). I have seen references to the Porsche factory chain tensioner tool 9599 which is apparently quite expensive and, if I understand correctly, unnecessary according to Wayne Dempster's book: "If you do not have this extremely expensive tool (upper right inset of Figure 24), you can tighten up the tension on the chain using the regular chain tensioner. Reinstall the tensioner completely into the bottom of the case."

So, do I do, or do I don't need this? If you have any experience with this please let me know. confused.gif

If you are just replacing the hydraulic tensioners, the tool(s) is not necssary; start by first running your cam deviation values with the Durametric system for refference, then just lock the engine at TDC, lock the cams, and you are set to swap out the tensioners. When done, recheck the cam deviation values to be sure nothing moved.

If you are going deeper (e,g,: removing the chains, etc.) you need some addtional tooling to hold the cams in place while the cam covers are off. Once the parts swap out was done, you would then need the 9599 during the process of retiming the cams to properly tension the paddles and chains while setting the timing.

You should also be aware that if you are just changing out the hydraulic chain tensioner units, you do not need to drop the engine.

At the moment my cam deviation values are about 0.35 and -9.35. I would like to start by changing the chain rails (pads). If I can do this without dropping the engine, then I could easily check to see if this fixes the problem. I just figured that this would be a real birch to do with the engine still stuffed up in there. Shouldn't I necessarily replace the chains though?

That -9.35 is troublesome. As your original post only mentioned the tensioners, I did not know how deep you were planning to go. You can do all four tensioners with the engine in the car, but if you intend to do the chain paddles it would be quicker with the engine out, and there is no way to do the chains without pulling the engine as you are now into splitting the cases.

I was only thinking about the cam chains though. So I'd have to remove the cam cover but no further. Don't know whether this is more trouble to do it in the car or to drop the engine. Again, if it is doable in the car it simplifies some aspects of the job, but if it doesn't fix the problem then I'll have been working in cramped quarters for nothing. Dilemma! :eek:

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Some of your have followed my quest for info about dropping the engine and doing a chain tensioner swap/upgrade/replacement (986 forum). I have seen references to the Porsche factory chain tensioner tool 9599 which is apparently quite expensive and, if I understand correctly, unnecessary according to Wayne Dempster's book: "If you do not have this extremely expensive tool (upper right inset of Figure 24), you can tighten up the tension on the chain using the regular chain tensioner. Reinstall the tensioner completely into the bottom of the case."

So, do I do, or do I don't need this? If you have any experience with this please let me know. confused.gif

If you are just replacing the hydraulic tensioners, the tool(s) is not necssary; start by first running your cam deviation values with the Durametric system for refference, then just lock the engine at TDC, lock the cams, and you are set to swap out the tensioners. When done, recheck the cam deviation values to be sure nothing moved.

If you are going deeper (e,g,: removing the chains, etc.) you need some addtional tooling to hold the cams in place while the cam covers are off. Once the parts swap out was done, you would then need the 9599 during the process of retiming the cams to properly tension the paddles and chains while setting the timing.

You should also be aware that if you are just changing out the hydraulic chain tensioner units, you do not need to drop the engine.

At the moment my cam deviation values are about 0.35 and -9.35. I would like to start by changing the chain rails (pads). If I can do this without dropping the engine, then I could easily check to see if this fixes the problem. I just figured that this would be a real birch to do with the engine still stuffed up in there. Shouldn't I necessarily replace the chains though?

That -9.35 is troublesome. As your original post only mentioned the tensioners, I did not know how deep you were planning to go. You can do all four tensioners with the engine in the car, but if you intend to do the chain paddles it would be quicker with the engine out, and there is no way to do the chains without pulling the engine as you are now into splitting the cases.

I was only thinking about the cam chains though. So I'd have to remove the cam cover but no further. Don't know whether this is more trouble to do it in the car or to drop the engine. Again, if it is doable in the car it simplifies some aspects of the job, but if it doesn't fix the problem then I'll have been working in cramped quarters for nothing. Dilemma! :eek:

Old Porsche shop adage: "When in doubt, pull it out..........." Engines are always easier to work on when bolted to an engine stand, you can put them in any position that is convenient to what you are doing; can't say that when it is sitting in the car.

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"Old Porsche shop adage: "When in doubt, pull it out..........." Engines are always easier to work on when bolted to an engine stand, you can put them in any position that is convenient to what you are doing; can't say that when it is sitting in the car."

Well, I think I will do just that! Bought the engine stand and the support beam today, got a line on an ATV jack which I will pick up soon! I've got my Bently's and my 101 Projects. Got my list of possible things to upgrade with part numbers. Got my friends here in the forums! Wish me luck! :cheers:

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  • 1 month later...

I have rebuilt and timed 2.5 engine without the 9599 tool. Even Baum says it's optional.

Trick is to get proper tension on the chains while adjusting cams with special tool 9612. This can be achieved by turning the crank a few times before locking it back at TDC with tool 9595 (or some other dowel).

Engine is now running with zero cam deviation on both banks. New variocam pads may have something to do with that as well. :-)

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Thanks for this. My project was delayed due to clement weather in November, but now I am in the midst of dropping the engine in my barely heated garage. This mornings temp was minus 25 C here in Montreal (about -13 F), a bit nippy.

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NewArt, good to hear your moving along with the project.

I had a chuckle reading your working in the cold temperatures. I did the same thing with layers of warm clothing and at the time there were other forum members who were complaining about working on their cars outside in the heat and high humidity!

Just a note for you, if your removing any plastic pieces be patient with these cold temps. Plastic breaks easily with the cold especially small tabs, I learn't the hard way. I think I would try a hair drier next time.

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"Plastic breaks easily with the cold especially small tabs"

Oh so true. And the list of small plastic parts to replace grows longer...

​Didn't go near the garage today but tomorrow they're forecasting a balmy -13, so back to work! With my construction heater blasting, I can get it up to 3 or 4 degrees in there. Suits me fine, it's just the plastic parts that complain! :eek:

Didn't remove the bumper but I got the exhaust out with a bit of ingenuity and a modicum of impolite language! Now it;s the transmission's (tip) turn.

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