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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/14/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
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  9. 1 point
    I'm not sure. I've heard it's best to stick with a Porsche branded pump (rather than even the OEM Pierburg).
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    There is with the 06 Turbo, so probably with the S as well. I had it happen on an 06 at 125000 miles. Valve body replacement fixed it.
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  13. 1 point
    That is perfect , many thanks. As you said the 2" one will be too small meaning i would need to make an adaptor spacer to take up the difference , the 2 5/8" (67mm) looks like it will be too large to fit into the bezel so i can rule that out as i am not butchering a new (expensive) panel. Thanks again. Regards - Kenny
  14. 1 point
    I'm pretty sure the 2" opening will be too small. Here are two pictures taken from the front, but without removing the panel, I can't verify. Let me know if you need me to do that.
  15. 1 point
    Hi there - moving from air cooled to a new to me 2002 white w/natural grey Interior. It’s mainly original with GT2 wheels size, offset, and tire sizes, fab speed exhaust, assuming an ECU tune of some sort (it hits .9 bar consistently), Billet diverter valves. For options it’s a tip, full carbon, full leather interior, three spoke wheel, dual electric seats, Bose sound system, and aero option. It’s got 44k miles and appears to have been well kept. I’ve had the wheels re-powder coated gloss gunmetal (from satin black), new tires (fronts were from 2006 :-)), and I’ve reconstructed the carbon dash pieces and side ac vents. Im chasing down a parasitic current draw and think I have it isolated to the radio but not 100%. Just started that process and I’m sure I will have questions. . I plan to do oil and trans fluids and probably new front disks and pads. It’s a pretty amazing performance car and I’m excited to own and work on. My last three Porsche were 86 Carrera, 70 914-6, and 67 912-6 (which paid for this one). Love the great AC and modern convenience of this car + brute strength...
  16. 1 point
    PET shows that up to 06-11-2016 the LEDs weren't handed, as PET shows one part number for both sides (7PP 919 238) which is now superceded to 7PP 919 238B. £6.06 GBP incl. VAT. I suspect the Touran part I listed is the same, as it just has a different number prefix.
  17. 1 point
    Might it be the same as used on the VW Toureg? tmp1.pdf tmp2.pdf
  18. 1 point
    I replaced them with LEDs no worries....but the thing I need to fix is the strip of LEDs across the top of the tail light...any idea how to?
  19. 1 point
    These cars (specifically Cayenne) seem very sensitive to weak a battery and poor grounds. Whenever I see multiple electrical issues on a Cayenne - that is where I start.
  20. 1 point
    It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside door handle. This switch is used to sense that the handle is lifted. b] One on the inside door handle, which has the same function. When the car is unlocked and either handle is lifted, this signals the alarm control module (ACM) to lower the appropriate window by 10mm, and turn on the interior lights. As soon as the door opens, another switch inside the door lock (explained later) tells the ACM that the door is open, which holds the window down until the door is closed, when the window is raised, and the dimming timer on the interior lights is started. Once the car is locked, the outside handle switches are ignored by the ACM. The remaining five switches are inside the door lock assembly: c] One switch senses if the door is open or closed. d] One senses that the key has been turned to the 'lock' position. e] Another senses that the key has been turned to the 'unlock' position. f] One senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'lock' position. g] Another senses that the door lock motor has reached the 'unlock' position. TYPICAL FAULTS All these microswitches can be problematic, and it is common for one or more to fail at some time. These are some of the common failures and symptoms: 1) The door window won't drop when lifting a handle. This is usually the handle microswitch which has failed. 2) The window drops, but goes back up when the door opens, or when the handle is released. This can be the handle microswitch, or more likely the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) has stuck. Because the system thinks the door is still closed, it sends the window back up. 3) Door window won't go up the last 10mm. This is likely to be the 'door open/closed microswitch' ( c ) stuck in the opposite sense to (2). The system thinks the door is still open, so won't allow the window to go back up. Note that in this case the door will still lock, but you may get a single-beep from the alarm horn. 4) Door will not lock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (d) is broken. This is very rare, as this microswitch is hardly ever used – most times the car is locked by remote. 5) Door will not unlock with key. The 'key lock' microswitch (e) is broken. This is also very rare, for the same reason. 6) Door locks, and then immediately unlocks, usually accompanied by a double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door locked' microswitch (f). The locking motor physically operates the door lock, but the microswitch to sense this has failed/stuck. The ACM promptly unlocks the car. In this case, the only way to lock the door is to use the emergency locking procedure. Turn the key in the door to the lock position and back three times in quick succession. 7) The door unlocks, but there is a beep or double-beep from the alarm horn. This is the 'door unlocked' microswitch (g). Although the door is unlocked, the ACM has not recognised that. The alarm will not sound, as turning the key in the lock has deactivated it. FIXES The inside and outside handle microswitches are available separately, and are not too expensive. Although alternative equivalent switches may be available, the genuine Porsche switch comes with a connector and wiring, so it makes sense to use an original. Part Numbers: Inside handle microswitch: 996.613.123.00 (Same both sides) Outside handle microswitch: 996.613.125.00 (Left) / 996.613.126.00 (Right) The door lock microswitches are not available separately. You have to buy the complete door lock assembly, at a cost of around $120. It has been known for people to repair the offending switch though. This is a picture of a typical failure of a 'door open/close' microswitch (courtesy of another RennTech member): You can see that the plastic plunger has broken, jamming the switch lever inside. These switches are (apparently) made by Burgess, but as yet the source and part number are unknown. There are several other similar standard switches on the market for around $2, and people have stripped down the new switch and rebuilt the old one with the plunger from the new one. OTHER SWITCHES IN THE ALARM SYSTEM The other switches and contacts in the alarm system are to monitor the lid closures: Front lid microswitch Rear lid microswitch Oddment compartment microswitch Glove box microswitch Radio contact (to detect radio theft) An open compartment or switch failure will cause a single-beep of the alarm horn on locking. A system error will cause a double-beep. Other elements of the system include an interior monitoring sensor (in the overhead lighting), an alarm readiness light (on the dashboard in the centre) and a central locking button (on the dashboard). Options are a tilt sensor (next to the battery or under the left-hand seat) and an alarm siren (next to the battery).
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Tools needed: T20 Torx driver A few flat blades or knifes Soldering Iron Solder Solder wick or desolder tool Parts Needed: http://www.westfloridacomponents.com 1/4W 0.22 ohm Mini-Melf Resistor Beyschlag MMA0204-50AL0R22J - 6 IRFZ24NS FZ24NS HEXFET Power MOSFET International Rectifier - 2 Step 1: Remove Lower panel under drive side. One screw in the middle Step 2: Locate module closest to the center of the vehicle. Module will be installed SIDEWAYS next to the module that has 4 connector ports Step 3: Once module has been removed, use the screwdriver to loosen and eventually release the tabs along the side of the module. Easiest to start on one end. Step 4: Locate the two possible common failure points. MOSFETS will be located next to the blue capacitors in the corner. Resistors will be located on the BACKSIDE in the opposite corner. Step 5: Test the resistors. Use your multimeter and measure across the resistors. Unfortunately the top 3 and the bottom 3 are in parallel, so it is hard to tell when an individual has failed. Luckily they seem to fail all together, so if you see open circuit on your resistance measurement, just replace them all. Step 6: Carefully use your soldering iron to desolder the resistors. Clean the mades of any excess solder and resolder the new resistors. Step 8: Test the MOSFETs. Use your multimeter on DIODE mode (triangle with a flat line across the point). Red lead on SOURCE (right leg), black lead on GATE (left leg) = OPEN CIRCUIT Red lead on SOURCE (right leg), black lead on DRAIN (TOP or back pad) = .5V to .8V Again, desolder carefully and replace. The hardest part will be heating the DRAIN, or back of the MOSFET hot enough to desolder off the board. Don't worry about heat, MOSFETs are very robust compared to other parts. Step 9: Reinstall everything back into the car and DRIVE. Starting the car is critical, the KESSY module will not reset until you do so. Enjoy saving 1000 bucks!
  23. 1 point
    The most common cause of that is a failing valve body in your transmission. Your description matches the symptoms to the "T." Its turned into a fairly common issue with the 04 - 05 Cayennes. I would not say that replacing the valve body is an "interim fix." If you get the valve body replaced your transmission should last indefinitely. I've seen a lot of Cayennes get valve bodies replaced and never have transmission problems again. I'm curious, who gave you this advice?
  24. 1 point
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Images are for LHD cars - RHD cars will be on the opposite side. Parts you will need: 1 ea 996 571 219 03 Pollen Filter (Charcoal activated filter) Tools you will need: T25 Torx drive Remove T25 Torx screw that holds the panel cover in place (passenger side front trunk). Remove the panel cover. Remove the particle filter upwards and out of the housing guide. Insert a new particle filter into the housing guide. Check that the filter is correctly fitted and in the correct installation position. Replace the panel cover. Tighten T25 Torx screw that holds the panel cover in place.
  25. 1 point
    :welcome: For the Cayenne S and Turbo (V8) <----- FRONT 1 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 1, bank 1 2 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 2, bank 1 3 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 3, bank 1 4 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 4, bank 1 5 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 5, bank 2 6 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 6, bank 2 7 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 7, bank 2 8 - Ignition bar module, cylinder 8, bank 2
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