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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/16/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Definitely recommend a low temp thermostat. If you never cleaned the radiators then you will be shocked and that could help a lot. Most importantly, don’t give up, it is probably something simple!
  2. 1 point
    I got a replacement fan from my dealer, and went ahead and replaced it. Problem solved, I can activate both fans in Durametric. Tips for other beginners like me who want to do this swap. 1. I removed the bumper and it is easier to access the setup. You must remove the front wheel well liner and the thin tubular cross brace. 2. It is easiest to remove the bracket supporting the radiator from below. The electric connection box on the inside/top of the bracket and the large radiator hoses connect with torx screws, while the others are hex (10 and 13mm). So you need torx sockets. 3. You don't need to disconnect the radiator vent hose. 4. You don't need to separate the AC condenser from the radiator, but it is easy to do, and allows some wiggle room to clean the debris out. I blew compressed air from the back and vacuumed from the front. Quite a bit of mess came out and the rads still don't look clean. Oh well. 5. The electric connector on the top of the fan assembly (air duct) is tricky. Seems like it should come apart by pulling outward (laterally), but in fact you should grab the inner half and pull it inward. The outer half is attached to the body of the air duct. Luckily I realized this before I broke something. Thanks for the hint that the fan might be a problem. That's why this forum is so great!
  3. 1 point
    Check your radiators like you planned. check your water pump, see if there is seepage. you can remove the serpentine belt and see if it turns freely. lastly, it could be your thermostat sticking. mike
  4. 1 point
    C1 to C4 are easy to remember for me so I always ask ppl to check those. You are right that one of them is for the fuel pump so it will not cause your symptoms. Next things to check are clutch switch (jump it) and make sure the battery cables are tight. Next place to check is the rear starter relay panel.
  5. 1 point
    Yes, replacing a fan does not require draining coolant. I doubt both fans would die at once - plus you say you can run them through Durametric. If you clear the codes and run the car (with AC on) which is the first fault code?
  6. 1 point
    The airbag control unit is usually right below the PCM - so check that wires were not damaged or accidentally disconnected.
  7. 1 point
    I’m not surprised that anyone would not honor any warranty after it has expired; that is why it has a date on it. Also not surprised about your comment on the EPS bearing, falls into the rules of small numbers.
  8. 1 point
    Welcome to RennTech Try contacting board sponsors Sunset Porsche in Beaverton OR.
  9. 1 point
  10. 1 point
    Hi there I’m thinking maybe your condenser fan is not working properly or is clogged with debris I’d start there. If the system is cooling when you are moving down the road I would say that is a likely culprit.
  11. 1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. 1 point
    Porsche specific codes (codes other than emissions codes) require a more specialized tool. Durametric (requires laptop) - $287 Autel MaxiSys MS906BT - $1350 Porsche PIWIS Tester (lease) - $18,000 per year For the DIYer the Durametric is your best solution.
  14. 1 point
    The correct filter for an early 996 is the 986-307-403-00, which was also used in the Boxster.
  15. 1 point
    If it is not resetting after a turn then it is likely broken and needs replacement - sorry.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Top shock mounts, front and rear they degrade over time too. Sorry should have explained better.
  18. 1 point
    Removing the real seal will lubricate the factory bearing without any junk additives.
  19. 1 point
    This is exactly were everyone that thinks they can do better themselves goes wrong. The LN ceramic hybrid bearings cannot be "sourced from hundreds of places for a variety of prices". The LN bearing is the final result of a lot of R&D, trying out various bearing materials until they fail, to identify the best selection of components for the final bearing. And as that design is produced exclusively for them, you are going to have a very difficult time replicating their results Good luck...…………..
  20. 1 point
    Fuse 16 in the left fuse support. In many cases, it is not the fuse but a bad horn (or horns). The factory horns are not very good.
  21. 1 point
    In many states these upgrades are illegal due to excessive glare as the headlight's do not have the correct projectors to create the proper beam cut off. Absolute ticket bait as well.
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    Btw, you can find detailed instructions from LN here.
  24. 1 point
    Again, I said: "No, as long as you follow the rest of LN Engineering's instructions to the letter. "; and stated that "my personal preference was to remove them all". Your choice is yours.
  25. 1 point
    LN wrote up the 3 and 5 chain instructions, available online, which should be followed. My personal preference on three chains is to pull all the tensioners.
  26. 1 point
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  27. 1 point
    Started a DIY to replace my water pump today. Got the airbox out and was about to remove my s-belt. Used a 24mm socket to crack right on the tensioner pulley and that's the problem... it did not move over and loosen the play of the s-belt. In fact, it just turns left and/or right w/o moving the pulley at all. Felt behind the pulley and found a nut to tighten from behind but could not get any of my openbox wrenches to fit in that tight space. Need some shorter wrenches to get in there... Looks like a 16mm(someone please confirm) but wondering if anyone else ran into this issue re the t-pulley and if it's just a matter of tightening(is there a proper torque setting) the front and back(nut and screw) or do I need to be mindful of something... BTW, I replaced my s-belt last year. The tensioner worked properly then... so wondering if I may have cracked on it too hard previously and loosen it... hope it's not a stripped issue. Car is an '08 997.1S with 51K miles. On a side note: I couldn't find my mechanics extending mirror... had to brake into my wife's make-up bag for a small mirror to get back there. You guess it... she came out to check on me and caught me with her "compact" inside the engine compartment. Not a good day for the weekend mechanic.
  28. 1 point
    I recently, yesterday, noticed one of the pair of washer nozzles on the passenger side of my 01 C4 was gone. I blame the guys who did my car inspection because it was not missing before then. Personally, I don't care if it has a washer or not since I have never used it and don't see using the system any time soon if ever. I googled just a replacement nozzle head and figured they were commonly lost and relatively inexpensive. It turned out that everyone wants to sell you the ENTIRE unit for around $220 and some state the bumper must be removed to replace. That sounded stupid to me on the order of replacing your entire lawn irrigation system every time I ran over a sprinkler head with the lawn mower. I have a 3D printer and after doing a design that at least in theory should allow water to be forced through it, i printed out a replacement nozzle head. It took me 3 design tries to get just the right dimension but I finally had a snug fitting visually idential copy of the lost nozzle. I tried to design it at least somewhat functional but like I said I don't really care if it works or not, just that it covers up the obvious hole where it used to sit. The problem I encountered was the piece is tiny and I was reaching the resolution limit of my printer a Makerbot 2. This caused problems with the sphere design having a shell to thin to print correctly. I may later redisign the top sphere part and give it a thicker shell or simply forgo the sphere design and make it an angled tube instead.
  29. 1 point
    B6 is in working order. I also checked B1 (convertible top unit control) even though I am a non-convertible. All of the fuses seem to be in working order. Is there anyway to reset the window control module?
  30. 1 point
    How about item 6 in this image http://www.autoatlanta.com/porsche-parts/hardparts.php?dir=9PA-03-06&section=817-45
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    I suggest you to check wiring from airbag module to the instrument cluster. If it's ok then diagnose instrument cluster as well. A bad circuit or unusual ohm reading can result on a light triggering. If this also fails, consider having your mechanic replacing the airbag module with a used one for testing.
  33. 1 point
    As an FYI for others... 16mm bolt on the back of the tensioner pulley can be tighten as you torque the 24mm socket of the tensioner pulley to solve this issue. I used a stubby 16mm open box wrench to accomplish this by wedging it against the tensioner arm. Apply Just enough torque to get it from freely turning on it's own.
  34. 1 point
    Removal Convertible top in service position 1. Removing side-panel lining. Removing side-panel lining -1-. 2. Removing rear side window inner seal. Remove front and rear fastening screws -2- from the convertible top support and the mount for the belt guide section, and pull rear side window inner seal -3- up and out. 3. Closing side window. Press the micro-switch -4- in the windscreen frame and actuate the rocker switch -5- at the same time. 4. Releasing power window. Release adjusting elements with the adjustment tool -7-. To do this, loosen and unscrew the nuts -6- from the adjusting element. Adjustment tool for the rear power window. 5. Detaching convertible-top support. Remove fastening screws -2- and fastening nut -8- from convertible-top support -10- and pull the deflection fitting and mount for the belt guide section -9- up and out. Pull convertible-top support -10- inward and fix between B-pillar and the convertible-top support with a spacing block -12- dimension - A = 30 mm. 6. Removing power window. Push rear power window -11- upward and push both locking tabs of the electrical connection -13- outward and disconnect. Install 1.Inserting power window. Connect electrical plug connection -13-, insert power window -11- into the window shaft from above and position in the mounts in the inner side section. 2. Screwing down convertible-top support. Remove spacing block -12- between B-pillar and convertible top support -10-, Position fastening screws -2- and fastening nut -8- in convertible-top support -10- and tighten, Tightening torque 23 Nm (17 ftlb,). Push deflection fitting into the mount for the belt guide section -9-, Screw in and tighten fastening screws -2-. Tightening torque 50 Nm (37 ftlb.). 3/4. Adjusting and screw down power window. By moving the power window -4- with respect to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle, the power window can be adjusted by dimension Y = ± 10 mm, The contact pressure of the side window upper edge on the convertible top is adjusted by screwing the lower adjusting element -A- in or out by dimension X = ± 10 mm-, The contact pressure on the rear window inner seal or the offset from the door window is adjusted by screwing both of the upper adjusting elements -B- in or out by dimension X = ± 5 mm. Adjust the basic setting of the adjusting elements -B- of the top edge of the rear side section relative to the side window, Dimension C Front top edge of rear side section = 11 mm Dimension D Rear top edge of rear side section = 14 mm Push the power window backward or forward and adjust the gap between the side window and door window to E = 9 mm, Adjust the contour or the offset from the door window at adjusting element -A-, Tighten adjusting elements -A- and -B-, Tightening torque 23 Nm (17 ftlb.). 5. Installing rear side window inner seal. Insert rear side window inner seal -3- into rear side section slot and position on the convertible-top support or mount for belt guide section, Screw in and tighten fastening screws -2-. 6. Install side-panel lining.
  35. 1 point
    After no response here and some suggestions / online diagnoses from a few other Porsche boards, I'm a lot smarter. My third trip to the dealer today might have solved my problem, though. On my second dealer visit, the head mechanic squirted some magic Wurth lubricant on the front lower control arms and sway bar bushings, then tightened the drop links and sway bars. Our plan was to lube/tighten one thing at a time. Unfortunately, the squeak remained and continued to get worse over time. I talked to Steve Alarcon at Johnson's Alignment, and he suggested retorquing everything to factory spec, as he's seen some fasteners loosen over time causing a squeak. I went back to the dealer this afternoon for the third time planning to just have them retighten everything, but the mechanic wanted to take another test drive first. As we started driving through the canyons at 30 MPH, he finally heard the sound (chatter/squeak/rattle). A few more miles through the canyons after doing lots of circles at various intersections, we were finally able to reliably reproduce the squeak (he was calling it a rattle at this point). After driving back and forth numerous times at the intersection of Mulholland and Decker Canyon (me driving, him standing outside), we got the car positioned at the right angle such that he could bounce the front up and down to cause the squeak. After poking around in the wheel wells and under the hood, he closed the hood and claimed success. Driving back to the dealership, the squeak was just about gone. When we got back, he popped the hood, adjusted the hood latch, squirted some WD-40 in the latch, and said the squeak was gone. Sure enough, I haven't heard it since. The good, bad and moral of this experience: I've got a great working relationship with the service department at my dealer. Two test drives, probably 3 hours of the head mechanic's time and a couple squirts of various lubes cost me exactly $0 dollars. I asked them to charge me for their time, but they didn't feel they did anything worth charging me. Is this a great way to build loyalty and repeat business or what? I was almost convinced the problem was worn lower control arms based on numerous posts here and on other forums. I really want some of the GT-3 lower control arms now, but can't justify the cost now. The mechanic saw my notes on our test drive today and said he'd be happy to put them in, but I can't see spending a grand, give or take, when I didn't really have any suspension problem. Several morals to the story - building a good relationship with a dealer (or independent) is invaluable, and trying to diagnose squeaks and rattles over the internet is potentially wrong and expensive. If anyone is interested, my posts on other boards, including some good information on GT-3 lower control arms, can be found at: Boxster Spec.com: GT3 control arm bushings vs. stock, Same or different? Boxster Racing Board: GT3 control arms Pelican Parts Boxster & Cayman Forum: Boxster front squeak
  36. 1 point
    Well I have good news. You need the correct size matched tires. Your car has Traction control built into the abs control unit. When the abs control unit sees a difference in speeds front to rear at speeds the abs control unit sends a signal to the dme to hold the idle high incase the clutch is reengaged. The abs/tc gets confused because it is seeing a slower wheel speed in the rear than the front so it thinks the rear end ir locking up when you back off the gas. the cheap fix is to just turn the TC off. and you will be ok other wise you will need to get correct matching tires for that car. Unfortunately I have spent way to much time on this problem....I believe I have about 22 hours clocked onto tracing this stupid problem out that I will probably get paid 3 for but at least I have the glory of saying I figured it out :) please repost if this works. Thanks Tom Porsche of North Scottsdale
  37. 1 point
    My 98 Boxster's front trunk compartment light has never worked so I decided to investigate. I first swapped the light assembly itself with the exact same light fixture in the rear trunk and found both lights worked. I deduced that it must be the front microswitch and ordered a new one from Sunset Porsche in Oregon. The cost was: $43.13 plus $8.00 shipping to Washington State. The Part number is: 996-613-206-00 I removed the carpet trunk liner. The front trunk liner is made up of 2 sections and I only had to remove the front section. There was one thumbscrew clip on the passenger side and one thumbscrew clip opposite on the driver's side. Also on the driver's side there was one snapin clip and 2 additional snapin clips located in the front of the trunk. All five clips are very easy to find and remove. I then removed the plastic trim directly on top of the latch and microswitch. There are 4 screw plugs and you simply turn the plastic plugs 1/4 to 1/2 of a turn: Take a 10mm wrentch and loosen but don't remove the two bolts inside the trunk that hold the latch: Then remove the metal backing plate: Remove the 10 mm bolts the rest of the way. Disconnect the harness by pinching the clips and pulling: Next you need to remove the harness from the metal attachment clip by sliding the clip and releasing it. This one is hard to reach and see and a flashlight might be necessary. The photo below shows the release clip after it has been removed: The assembly can now be removed. To separate the microswitch, examine your new switch and you will notice 2 clips. The photo below shows one of the clips. To disengage this clip you need to take a thin blade screw diver push in as noted by the arrow on the photo and you pull up as you press the clip in: If the first clip is placed at 1:00 o'clock the second clip will be at 7:00 o'clock and it simply hooks over the assembly. When installing the new switch, place the 7:00 o'clock hook on first and then snap the 1:00 clip into place. You may have to work the swich down into place just slightly before hooking and snapping. Assembly is the reverse of the removal and Bob's your Uncle and the front trunk light works!
  38. 1 point
    This is a continuation from the front wheel bearing change. That was good practice for the rear of your car. Although i thought the rear was more difficult than the front but after i was done and found a couple of tricks that i will share, it might actually be easier. Having the right tools always make things go smoother. The B90-P2 tool i bought at http://www.samstagsales.com/Porsche.htm#axle Took only 3 days to get it. I was away at work for 4 days so the timing was perfect. Great service. Earlier this year people were wondering where to get the tools to take apart the electrical connectors. Well sams tag sales has all the Porsche tools needed. With the SIR TOOLS kit they sent me the catalog with all the speciality stuff. If you don't have an arsenal of basic tools i would recommend going to Sears. The prices are higher than a China Freight but Sears does treat their people well and nothing like supporting the american people right? Attached is a photo of a great tool set that has almost all that you need. It even comes with the 32mm large socket for the hub bolt. Aside from those tools you will need some larger wrenches. 21mm for the track arm. (Actually you don't have to take this apart...more later) But you do need some larger wrenches for the Sir Tools Kit. 1 and 1/16. Some allen key sockets. Best to get a set of 7 in metric. Sears also sells the Torx socket set too. You will need at least 2 torque wrenches. My trick for the 360 foot pound setting is later. Some plyers, punch, screwdriver set. Phillops, flat etc... Discount auto parts sells a paint can full of GunK degreaser. And has a tin to put the small bolts in. Great stuff. Don't drink it. If i forgot some i will post it further down. So lets get going... Have the car parked so you have lots of space to work around it. Back the car into the garage far enough so you have room to close the garage door if you need to make a run to the tool store. Don't ask me why i mention this! Set the parking brake, and remove the center cap. I pushed in an allen key and used a vice grip to pull it out. Pull hard. Get your long 4 foot bar, 32mm socket and loosen the axel bolt. You can even take it off all the way, it doesn't reall matter. Loosen the 5 lug bolts, 4 19mm and the third i hope you have the locking one. Jack the car up and put it up on stands. You will need to use the jack later and it just isn't safe to have your head under a car with just a hydraulic jack. Remove the wheel bolts and then the wheel, don't forget to use the factory supplied tool to help with the removal and installation of the wheel.
  39. 1 point
    9) Remove the xenon ballast in the bi-xenon headlights (6 bolts) then disconect the harness, now remove the 5 pins (thin black, thin brown, red, yellow and uncovered ground wire) you only need two wires to turn on the xenon (Strong black and Strong brown) 10) Cut all the wires in the connector (bi-xenon headlight) NEAR to the connector and then use the plastic trick to remove it from the headlight. Take the Halogen connector and use this diagram: PIN 1 - Parking Light Lead (+) PIN 2 - High Beam Adjuster Supply PIN 3 - High Beam Adjuster Sensor PIN 4 - High Beam Adjuster Ground PIN 5 - EMPTY PIN 6 - Low Beam Lead (+) PIN 7 - High Beam Lead (+) PIN 8 - Additional High Beam Ground (-) PIN 9 - Turn Signal Lead (+) PIN 10 - Low Beam Ground/Parking light/Turn Signal (-) PIN 11 - EMPTY PIN 12 - EMPTY (tanks to toby http://www.renntech.org/forums/index.php?s...pic=1189&st=20) 11) Tap every wire as this diagram says, note that inside the headlights (Halogen / bi-xenon) the grounds wires are brown and leads black 12) if you want to, remove this resistor from the bi-xenon shuttle 13) Remember to tap the bi-xenon shuttle + Auxiliary high beam whit the pins PIN 7 - High Beam Lead (+) PIN 8 - Additional High Beam Ground (-) Corner light + xenon ballast whit PIN 6 - Low Beam Lead (+) PIN 10 - Low Beam Ground/Parking light/Turn Signal (-) 14) Check all the wires, solde and insulate all wires. 15 reinstall the xenon ballast, connectors and you are done!
  40. 1 point
    Ok here we go: vehicle: Porsche Cayenne S 2004 (Halogen Headlights - No Air Suspenssions - No Headlights washers) Factory halogens headlight part no. bi-xenon headlight part no. Before start i have to remove the orange look of the headlight... Done! Things you need to know... you DON`T need the bixenon wire harness (part no. 955 631 239 10) to make the bixenon headlights work. I re-wire the internal of the bi-xenon headlight. * The only diference are: 1) bi-xenon have an extra light called (cornering) i tap this to the xenon wires, every time the xenons turn on both cornerin lights goes on. ALSO this prevent the computer detect a problem whit the low bean xenon ballast. 2) I tap the bi-xenon shuttle whit the auxiliary high beam lights, if i don`t have the xenons on and i flash the high beams, only the auxiliary and the shuttle goes on, NOT the xenon. there is a resistor in the shuttle that you can remove (more details next...) * Start 1) Take out both headlights (Please see manual for more info) 2) Take the 3 covers out 3) Remove the Autoleveling motor (remove the 3 pin harness and two bolts) from the Halogen headlight 4) You have to take out the Pin conector, to do this insert a plastic (Use an old Credit card, cut it in two and then resize it to 3cm wide) insert the plastic at the top and bottom inside the housing make sure it reach the end and then pull out the connector (This is a pain in the a..) 5) Once the connector is out start to cut each terminar as long as you can, NOTE: don`t cut the 3 pin connector in this harness you will use this whit the autoleveling motor in the bi-xenon headlight. in the end you will have this: 6) Say bye bye to the halogen headlight... don`t be panic now... 7) Remove the 3 covers in the bi-xenon headlights 8) Now remove the Autoleving motor (remove the 5 pin harness and two bolts), then install the 3 pin Autoleveling motor Side by side (Left Halogen 3 pin, Right bi-xenon 5 pin)
  41. 1 point
    The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 Paper gasket (Call Sunset Porsche, great guys) 10. Porsche part 986 307 403 00 ATF filter 11. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 rubber ring for fill plug 12. Kitty liter, you will spill 13. Socket set 14. Plenty of rags 15. Oil catch pan 16. Safety goggles First we assemble the filling tool out of parts you can find in Lowes or Home Depot type of homestores: 1. Hudson 1 gallon tank ($9.95) 2. Barbed fittings and 8 ft of tygon 3/8 clear hose. 3. 1/4 inch shut off valve - brass 4. 12 inch of flexible copper tube, 1/4" 5. Assemble as shown below and bend the tube per the picture. The steps are easy to follow: 1. Lift car off the ground and on jack stands. I need 16 inches on the stands to be comfortable. 2. Slide oil catch pan under fluid pan and remove drain plug with 8 mm allen bit 3. Remove the cross arm that traverses the fluid pan. Loosen only one bolt, remove the other. It will be easier for the next step and you can prop the arm to help catch the pan when the bolts are removed. 4. When the fluid has drained, secure drain plug back in and torque to 30 ft lbs. 5. Using the Torx 27 bit, remove all the screws crosswise. Move the cross arm out of the way as needed, but put back in a place where the pan will not fall. THE PAN STILL HAS FLUID in it, be careful 6. Remove pan carefully. The green gasket should still be attached to it. 7. Remove the two screws that hold the filter in place. Make sure the oil catch pan is underneath, the filter will have fluid as well. Remove filter. 8. Thinly coat some petroleum jelly on the suction collar of the ATF filter and install filter 9. Install new filter and screw the two screws to a torque of 4.5 ft lbs. 10. Empty the filter pan into the oil catch pan with all the waste oil. Place the filter pan on a flat surface and remove the gasket. 11. Set the plastic guard cap so the two windows are facing sideways. The holes will be used later for the fill tube and for the temperature probe. Notice how large they are. 12. Use the rags to clean the pan and the magnets in the pan. Set the magnets back to their original location. Here is a nice clean pan and magnets. 13. Place the new gasket on the pan. I used petroleum jelly thin coat on a few places to hold it in place. 14. Fit ATF pan back into transmission, tighten the screws crosswise to 7.5 ft lbs. It may be convenient to use the cross arm as a resting place while you re-attach the pan. 15. Remove the fill plug with the 17 mm allen key. Replace the ring gasket with the new one. 16. Fill the pressure tank with ATF fluid, make sure the valve is closed. Pump the tank to provide the pressure to move the fluid. The clear hose will show the red fluid filling it, and also you will see it running later. 17. Insert the "hook" end of the copper tube into the fill hole, and hook it into one of the holes mentioned before. Insert the temperature probe into the other hole, make sure it is secured. 18. Open the valve and let the ATF fluid begin to flow. You will have to add more fluid to the tank and keep it pumped. When the fluid begins to escape through the hole. It will drip, so close the valve. 19. Start the car. Open the valve to let more fluid into the ATF pan. Keep it pumped. Look at the temperature display on your probe. The temperature should not exceed 45 C. It begins at room temperature, so you got a few minutes. 20. Move the selector to position "P" and let idle for a a few seconds. When the fluid begins to emerge again from the filler tube, close the filling valve. 21. The engine should still be idling, keep an eye on the temp probe. With the brake pedal on, change the transmission through each position, holding the position for 10 seconds. 22. Open fill valve again until ATF fluid escapes from the hole. Make sure the temperature is higher than 30 C, and should be around 40C by now. Remove temperature probe and filler tube. 23. Replace the filler plug and torque to 59 ft lbs. 24. Turn engine off, and take car out for a test. :drive: 25. You are done, check for leaks, clean the spills (cat litter), and enjoy some smooth shifting.
  42. 1 point
    If that does not work then get out your dremel tool and cut a slot across the hole and use a big screwdriver. Whenever I have rounded out phillips screws that is what I do.
  43. 1 point
    Update: Just finished putting the new switch in. It's a little uncomfortable to crawl under the steering wheel on my back, and get my head and arms into a workable position in the footwell, but mechanically very easy. The old switch comes out with a quarter twist, then pull. Then you can more easily unplug the connector. Putting things back, I found it worked if I put the switch itself in first, and then plugged the cable in. When I tried w/ the cable plugged in first, I was unable to get enough force to push and twist with my fingers in the tiny space. It's a 5-minute job. The switch was a little under $20. There are two strange things about the part number, although in the end they don't seem to matter. First is that the part that I got has 3 different part numbers imprinted on it! They are: 996.613.111.01 996.613.113.01 996.613.114.01 Second is that the parts catalog shows that two different parts are required depending on whether you have a Tiptronic and whether you have cruise control. And yet, these two part numbers are both imprinted on the part I got (I guess they figured out how to make one part that works for all three cases, and that was not originally true?). The guy at the parts counter said there is another part with a red collar instead of brown. Here's what the parts catalog says: 996.613.114.01 - for manual transmission (M481) with cruise control (M454) 996.613.113.01 - for tiptronic (M249) with cruise control (M454) 996.613.113.01 - for manual without cruise (my car) (Looks odd, but that's what it says.) And finally, I took apart the old switch and the mechanism is dead simple. Pushing the pedal just makes the contacts...make contact. There was some greasy gunk on the contacts, probably whatever lubricant they use, gone bad from dirt. A good cleaning of the inside was probably all it needed. Worth a try if your switch goes bad. Thanks for the help. :beer:
  44. 1 point
    If you have not figured it out yet. The vent is held in with 2 locking clips. You press down on the clips and the vent pulls out. Jeff
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