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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/13/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    I've had one ABS pump on a BMW go south,, it made some really odd noises when the pressure pump started eating its own guts, if the accumulator does not come up to pressure,, it will run for quite a while,, You can always pull the ABS fuse and see if it still makes the noise.. Or pull the beuty cover in teh frunk and have someone turn it on whle you listen the pump is fairly obvious in my 2003.. 🙂
  2. 1 point
    Probably either a loose connection or the leveling servo is out. You should be able to activate the system with the Durametric or PIWIS and see what is going on.
  3. 1 point
    Fluids, like solid objects, can transmit noise. If the throw out bearing is going south, it can transmit that noise to clutch slave, and forward to the clutch reservoir, which is just on the opposite side of the firewall from the clutch pedal. Put the car on a lift and listen by the bellhousing, if the bearing is bad, you should hear it.
  4. 1 point
    You had a hydraulic not mechanical clutch. Does the ticking speed increase if you touch the accelerator lightly? Is it there at any time while driving? Johan
  5. 1 point
    Got an email about this and can't offer any mechanical advice but had a similar Durametric issue with the codes not matching Porsches codes. After numerous calls to Durametric, they acknowledged there was a bug in their 997.2 profile that transposed the digits. They were going to work on a fix so check to see if you have the most current rev. I never used it again so don't know firsthand. Good luck!
  6. 1 point
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  10. 1 point
    This is normal Cayenne behavior, once the key has been brought into crank position it can be released, either the engine starts immediately or the starter motor will stop on a timer (appr. 5-6 sec.) without holding the key. A faster starting speed on engines in good condition, indicates compression loss in general, after a longer standstill as 6 month and more, valve pollution is usually the cause. This can not always be determined with a compression measurement, a cylinder leak test is more appropriate.
  11. 1 point
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  13. 1 point
    So, when last we saw our hero, he was attempting to change out his old, yellowed and leaking expansion tank for a bright, clean new one. He removed the old expansion tank fairly easily after some yanking and twisting and turning. Installation of the new one, however, was destined to be a true test of character. He noticed that at first glance, the two tanks appeared similar yet, when compared side by side, there were slight differences, the primary one being a triangular section at the rear providing added capacity. He tucked all of the coolant and SAI hoses out of the way and commenced to attempt to put a square peg into an oblong hole. He undid the fuel rail feed/return lines and continued to push and twist and shove. He undid the motor mounts, lowered the engine as far as it would go, and continued the pushing, shoving and twisting. He removed the motor mounts altogether and attempted to wedge the engine sideways to obtain more space but, alas, there was no joy. Gentle readers, by this point the foul language had commenced, language so vulgar and cruel that decorum precludes its repetition on a family oriented forum. It is said, typically in hushed tones around a blazing campfire after several apertifs, that his head spun around 360 degrees on his shoulders, not unlike Linda Blair in "The Exorcist". Finally, he removed the upper black plastic bracket and, voila, the new tank fit where the old tank had been. Now our hero must deduce how to get the new tank past the bracket upon which it hangs in situs. In consideration of the amount of time, effort and foul language expended to this point, our hero was reduced to the most extreme of measures: surgery! He got out the dreaded cut off wheel and whacked off the first third of the black bracket, including the tabs, at an angle conducive to the tank's shape, and then there was joy and rejoicing, and candy!
  14. 1 point
    Thomas, the pump literally is used to make sure the hot coolant flows back and circulates properly to the heater matrix(s)to keep passengers warm, it also send it back to the rear heater matrix (if fitted). Some cayenne have a.c. evaporator and heater matrix in the boot as well as in the lower dash. "Four zone climate control" option I believe it was called. The "rest" button just runs this pump when the engine is off and the passengers are asking for warm air still from the interior fan hence hot coolant is required to circulate by electric pump. Hello from the UK my friend.
  15. 1 point
    Very happy with my 996. Original IMS and still running at 110k miles.
  16. 1 point
    First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution will work but obviously the problem remains and at some point you may end up stranded if the ignition switch completely fails. I stumbled upon some of the other threads and found that this needed fixing and I opted to replace just the switch as opposed to upgrading to the new complete unit that Porsche has moved to. This procedure is not new to the board, but I thought a step by step with pictures may be useful to those looking for an inexpensive solution. It cost me $12.11 including tax. If your ignition mechanism has been changed to the newer revised unit the ignition switch is a different part number but I assume the steps would be the same. The part for just the switch - no longer available through Porsche since they are only selling the entire $150 unit - is 4A0905849B. The switch alone is available mail order through Pelican for $10, Autohausaz.com was +/- $8.75, Ebay has them all over the map from $15-30. All of these options will work but require shipping charges and delivery time. I was hoping for a local option since I had the time to do it today. Here is what I found in Houston - a local Audi dealer had one in stock for $35, while VW had to order it (for more than $35 believe it or not). Doing a search online at parts stores using my Porsche got me nowhere so I opted to use an older Audi - in my case a 1997 Audi A8 since the part is the same. I found Autozone had one for >$40, OReilly came up blank but I did not call to check, a specialty imports place had one for $27 and then I found it in stock at NAPA for $11.19 + tax. Since NAPA seems to have stores all over the place I suggest looking there first if you don't feel like mail order. The complete part number at NAPA was ATM 4A0905849B using the 1997 Audi A8 as the vehicle. Here is a picture of the NAPA part (left) alongside the original part which I removed from my 996 cab - note the AUDI rings on the old part. Equipment needed: Small flat screwdriver - eyeglass or electronics size Philips screwdriver Torx driver 10mm wrench rubber pry tool Cold beer to celebrate 1) Disconnect the battery - I just undid the negative with a 10mm wrench 2) OPTIONAL but makes the job easier than the shop manual in my opinion. Remove the side air vent by pulling the headlight switch towards you and inserting a small blade screwdriver up from the six o'clock position. You should notice a spring like resistance which will release the knob and allow it to pull towards you. Here is a picture of the back of the knob showing the release mechanism Once the knob is off remove the three torx screws – one in the headlight control recess and two on the side After the screws are out take a rubber pry tool (or be careful with a flat screwdriver) and remove the vent housing - it will pull towards you with a little effort but not much. Once off I pulled it out far enough to gain access but left the headlight control connected because I was lazy and saw no need to unhook it. I forgot to take a picture of this part but it should be self explanatory. You will now see a philips screw directly in the back of the air vent - remove. 3) Crawl under the dash and remove the center piece (A) of the air vent - there is not much room and you will not miss it. The piece can be nudged towards the side to release on one end and then the other. Since you removed the screw from above you should be able to remove the middle and side piece now out the bottom. 4) Unplug switch by pulling directly off the back - do not unhook the purple tabs just pull the entire unit back. Make sure to pull this off BEFORE unscrewing and removing the switch as the screws holding the switch in make this much easier than trying to get a hand in there - believe me I jumped ahead and then resorted to screwing it back in. 5) Unscrew two set screws - one on the bottom on one on the opposite side. The screws are coated with red paint that may need to be chipped through with your screwdriver before you can get the screw to grab. I unscrewed the bottom screw while under the dash and then from the seat I reached under and could view the top screw through the side vent area and unscrewed it. Do not remove the screws just undo them far enough to remove the ignition switch. Bottom screw noted in this picture Top screw as viewed from side vent opening - this can also be done from underneath but the small space and clutch pedal against my head led me to look for easier access 6) Now that the screws are loose you should be able to pull the ignition switch out and replace it with the new one. Screw in the set screws, hook the harness back to it and get ready for a cold beer - not quite but almost 7) Slide out from under the foot well, hook up the battery and see if all is well. You may as well check before reattaching the rest. If the car starts as it should you will notice a nice smooth ignition with the slight spring back to the left just after ignition. Hook up the air vents, screw everything back together and push the headlight knob back in place 8) Crack open a cold beer and smile - you just saved a lot of money. This is one of the simplest "repair" DIY out there - it took me probably less than 20 minutes including removing the side vent and I took my time since I had never done it before. If I need to replace it again - which is likely - it will be even quicker. You can always replace the entire ignition module with the new and improved unit at around $150 I think - and alot more effort - but for $12 and 20 minutes I am hoping I can get some decent life out of this switch and then just replace it again in a few years if I need to. Like I said before - this is not a new DIY but I am hopeful that these pictures will be helpful. Thanks again to all of those who provided the prior posts.
  17. 1 point
    Strange, we still get them with the coating, but then we buy them in bulk. In any case, the rule of thumb is simple: Anything that rotates, vibrates, is time consuming to get at, or can come flying out if the bolts come loose will benefit from Loctite. As I noted earlier, we Loctite flywheel and pressure plate bolts on every make of car, you really do not want these to come loose. The axle flange bolts are an excellent example, we find loose ones all the time. Loctite is cheap, repairing a car that has had a pressure plate or flywheel come loose is not.
  18. 1 point
    FisterD is Contributing Member here - why not just ask him?
  19. 1 point
    A real check for a mechanical diff is to lift the rear, and rotate a wheel. If the other wheel rotates too, but in the opposite direction, then it has a mechanical locking diff. I added a Guards 60/40 LSD to my 986S racecar. There are certain turns at certain tracks with poor rear grip (Homestead Miami Speedway for example) where the LSD kicks in a lot. The Boxster race cars in the Grand Am Sports Car Challenge ST Class are also using this same diff. If anyone else is thinking of adding a diff for track use, the Grand Am guys tested both the 80/20 and the 60/40. The 80/20 caused excessive understeer. The 60/40 also makes it biased to understeer, but it can be dialed out with shocks, springs and sway bar settings. If anyone is thinking about a diff for spirited street driving, the torque biasing diffs are good.
  20. 1 point
    Finally got clutch sorted out. When they removed the tranny, they must have supported part of the weight of the tranny on the input drive shaft. This bent the disk slightly. After reinstalling it this made it wobble and drag slightly when released. Got a new disc installed with many appologies. 0 dollars out of pocket. Grief and worry was no charge.
  21. 1 point
    Ok guys, you've been waiting for this, and as promised, here is my brief, but descriptive walkthrough. this is what you will need as the following: Porsche Panel wedge tool Screw Driver w/ T-20 bit and Flat head bit Turbo Instrument Cluster strong fingers! Ok with that cleared away, here is the first step. Remove the black plastic gauge cover above the gauges. Use the wedge tool or , in this case I used my fingers! (don't use the fingers, i highly recomend not to , it hurts hahahah). Remember , you will need to apply gentle but enough pressure to detach the tabs off from the top cover of the dash that is over the cluster As you can see, the reason why i say "gentle" is because you have the tabs, take them off or apply too much pressure, and those bad boys can break, if anyone had experience with plastic and heat, they can easily become brittle. Just make sure you use precaution. Next, there are 5 screws to detach the dash cluster cover. 4 screws are attached to the top of the gauge cluster, while one (in back) inside the housing is there to hold the cover in place on the main dash. Remember, these are t-20 screws. two are parallel on each side , symmetrical to each other The rear screw, is located in the center back of the gauge cluster cover. as illustrated here. Once all screws are removed, just like the black pastic gauge cover, remove the upper gauge cover off gentley. They are tabbed in place, so apply the righ pressure. Note: when you remove the cover, be sure you have the washer for the 5th screw. This holds and aligns the cover of the cluster in place. as shown here Once the top is off, you will need to gain access to the bottom half. this is where most of the work will be done. here are the major things you will need to do - Remove trip pieces - unscrew support holding ignition/key - remove driver left AC vent Lets begin with taking off the side cover where the fuse housing is and the AC vent. Use the wedge tool to open the side panel and to take the ac unit out. the AC unit pops out as an entire pice, though the trim may seperate, this is normal, but becareful , damaging the trim will result in a loose fit. The reason for this to come out is there is a screw that holds the lower portion in place, which later will be necessary to access the bottom part of the instrument cluster Next take off the trim. There are three screws, t-20's , that are behing them. use the wedge tool again, gentley take the trim off. Again use precaution when taking them out. the outer ignition/key cover is part of the trim. so make extra effort to be careful Once the trim is removed, and the screws , make sure you remove the support ring , which holds the ignition key in place by way of screwing around the threads of the ignition. there is a special tool for this, but i used a flat head screwdriver to pussh along some tabs gentley till it was unscrewed. Repeat for the trim on the right near the windshield wiper control arm on the steering will. there should be two screws to take off. Also note, the screw inside the AC vent on the left driver side, it should be on the upper corner. Next, once all screws have been removed, gentley remove the tabs off , again, use precaustion, these are tabs, and need to be taken off with extreme care avoiding damage to them, and causing not to fit properly Once the bottom is removed, go ahead and take out the remaining two bottom screws that hold/support of the cluster. Again,these are t-20 screws Once remove, it's self explanetory from there, there are a green and blue connector, with purple latches. unlatch both, and remove the old cluster. Put in the turbo cluster, and presto, turn your car on, and test the cluster b4 putting it back together. your cluster should then boot up and you will see what awaits! Further notes - When you hook up your gauge cluster, you will hear a weird buzzing noise, that's ok, it's just the cluster responding to its connection. You will also notice that your milage should be at 0.0 for new clusters or whoever's previous milage was on it, if you bought it used. So be forwarned, My friend who knows vw/audi's said clusters like these have a tendancy to carry over their last cars info on milage over to whichever car they are being installed. So note to yourself, to write down your actual mileage. Once done, and pre programed, go ahead and put everything back together, and yours should look like this Alright now! I hope everyone is successful as I was, and hope all you skeptics out there can take it easy and rest knowing someone already done this for you! hahahah Enjoy! if you have any other questions or comments, just PM or reply! I'll be more than happy to help! I will also be posting a turbo bumper upgrade too for those who are interested later once i get my spare headlight washer parts in! til then good reading folks :D :P
  22. 1 point
    The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 Paper gasket (Call Sunset Porsche, great guys) 10. Porsche part 986 307 403 00 ATF filter 11. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 rubber ring for fill plug 12. Kitty liter, you will spill 13. Socket set 14. Plenty of rags 15. Oil catch pan 16. Safety goggles First we assemble the filling tool out of parts you can find in Lowes or Home Depot type of homestores: 1. Hudson 1 gallon tank ($9.95) 2. Barbed fittings and 8 ft of tygon 3/8 clear hose. 3. 1/4 inch shut off valve - brass 4. 12 inch of flexible copper tube, 1/4" 5. Assemble as shown below and bend the tube per the picture. The steps are easy to follow: 1. Lift car off the ground and on jack stands. I need 16 inches on the stands to be comfortable. 2. Slide oil catch pan under fluid pan and remove drain plug with 8 mm allen bit 3. Remove the cross arm that traverses the fluid pan. Loosen only one bolt, remove the other. It will be easier for the next step and you can prop the arm to help catch the pan when the bolts are removed. 4. When the fluid has drained, secure drain plug back in and torque to 30 ft lbs. 5. Using the Torx 27 bit, remove all the screws crosswise. Move the cross arm out of the way as needed, but put back in a place where the pan will not fall. THE PAN STILL HAS FLUID in it, be careful 6. Remove pan carefully. The green gasket should still be attached to it. 7. Remove the two screws that hold the filter in place. Make sure the oil catch pan is underneath, the filter will have fluid as well. Remove filter. 8. Thinly coat some petroleum jelly on the suction collar of the ATF filter and install filter 9. Install new filter and screw the two screws to a torque of 4.5 ft lbs. 10. Empty the filter pan into the oil catch pan with all the waste oil. Place the filter pan on a flat surface and remove the gasket. 11. Set the plastic guard cap so the two windows are facing sideways. The holes will be used later for the fill tube and for the temperature probe. Notice how large they are. 12. Use the rags to clean the pan and the magnets in the pan. Set the magnets back to their original location. Here is a nice clean pan and magnets. 13. Place the new gasket on the pan. I used petroleum jelly thin coat on a few places to hold it in place. 14. Fit ATF pan back into transmission, tighten the screws crosswise to 7.5 ft lbs. It may be convenient to use the cross arm as a resting place while you re-attach the pan. 15. Remove the fill plug with the 17 mm allen key. Replace the ring gasket with the new one. 16. Fill the pressure tank with ATF fluid, make sure the valve is closed. Pump the tank to provide the pressure to move the fluid. The clear hose will show the red fluid filling it, and also you will see it running later. 17. Insert the "hook" end of the copper tube into the fill hole, and hook it into one of the holes mentioned before. Insert the temperature probe into the other hole, make sure it is secured. 18. Open the valve and let the ATF fluid begin to flow. You will have to add more fluid to the tank and keep it pumped. When the fluid begins to escape through the hole. It will drip, so close the valve. 19. Start the car. Open the valve to let more fluid into the ATF pan. Keep it pumped. Look at the temperature display on your probe. The temperature should not exceed 45 C. It begins at room temperature, so you got a few minutes. 20. Move the selector to position "P" and let idle for a a few seconds. When the fluid begins to emerge again from the filler tube, close the filling valve. 21. The engine should still be idling, keep an eye on the temp probe. With the brake pedal on, change the transmission through each position, holding the position for 10 seconds. 22. Open fill valve again until ATF fluid escapes from the hole. Make sure the temperature is higher than 30 C, and should be around 40C by now. Remove temperature probe and filler tube. 23. Replace the filler plug and torque to 59 ft lbs. 24. Turn engine off, and take car out for a test. :drive: 25. You are done, check for leaks, clean the spills (cat litter), and enjoy some smooth shifting.
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