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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/14/2020 in Tutorials

  1. DIY tutorial to remove center console and replace stock shifter with a Numeric shifter. I completed this modification on my 2010 C4S. Center Console Removal and Shifter Replacement.pdf
    2 points
  2. Eureka! I suppose during the time you guys were typing, I was arriving at the same conclusion. I pulled the latch mechanism out and examined it up-close. The tension spring was out of a pocket on the latch and not providing any push when the latch was released. Hence, the hood could be pulled up out of 'battery' but would not pop up on its own. I disassembled the mechanism, lubed it, and re-inserted the spring into the latch. Put it back together and now all is well. Very simple to do. This is how I did it and you may find it useful. Do so at your own risk, yada yada yada. 1st, open
    2 points
  3. Ok here is the deal with removing these things..... 1. First you must remove Both AC Vents, and the Upper Center Console... The strips are held in from screws behind the dash, but reaching them is a waist of time! 2. The 2 small strips will pop out with some force, just take a flat head screwdriver and tap it in behind the strip. The screws will pop out from the back of the dash... The dash is a hard plastic material and the screw heads are small so they will come right through the dash.. 3. The long piece across the passanger side was fun... Tape the dash will several
    2 points
  4. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the ri
    2 points
  5. Cayenne route wire thru firewall2.pdf
    1 point
  6. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Parts you will need: 1 ea 0PB-115-466 Oil Filter (updated) 1 ea 946 107 322 75 Oil Filter Housing O-Ring 1 ea 900 123 152 30 Drain Plug Seal 9 ea Mobil 1 0W-40 or equal Tools you will need: Tire ramps or jack/jack stands T20 Torx driver Trim, panel tool 8 mm Allen wrench or Allen hex socket Oil filter wrench with 36 mm cap socket Socket wrench 9-quart oil catch pan Torque wrench Note: If your car has Air S
    1 point
  7. This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time:
    1 point
  8. I've had 8 months going around in circles trying resolve a leak in the passenger footwell (left hand side - UK). Tried all sorts, thinking it was air-con, windshield, drains, thinking it's solved and then more water. Absolutely sopping wet at times and at worse also a film of water over speaker grill and carpet under door soaked. I fixed broken cables yesterday that solved "ignition lock faulty", footwell was dry then, soaked today, only difference was it rained heavily in between which made me look at the sunroof drainage. Pushed a speaker cable down it, got stuck after about a metre. Poured
    1 point
  9. In our modern litigious world, manufacturers have learned that they must advise the users of their product of everything that might hurt them by using the product no matter how stupid it is, so when the users do hurt themselves, blame the manufacturer, and demand compensation, the manufacturer can say they warned them. Thus everything these days from cars to coffee cups have warning stickers of some sort on them. So it is with airbags, and every car owner in the US is blessed with stickers on the sunvisor telling them to be careful. If you are like me, I got the message a while ago, and d
    1 point
  10. I recently replaced the coolant pipes in my car. I needed to do the job myself because there was simply no way I was going to shell out anywhere from $1500 to $3500 in labor to have it done by the dealership or an independent shop. Plus, having read about the job, I knew they would be tearing through a ton of stuff and I really feared the "oh, it also needs this" scam. I did a LOT of research on the various forums before undertaking this job. Reading and printing out anything I thought was useful information. I would highly encourage anyone reading this to do the same. Fortunately, I
    1 point
  11. It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside do
    1 point
  12. About 3 weeks back I started getting a CEL with a Code 0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor "A" Circuit. Upper Limit Exceeded. After clearing the code it kept coming back within a day or two and the car stalled on two occasions. Based on research on the forums, this seemed very much in line with sensor failures on 955's and a DIY existed for these model years, but not the 957. My 957 now has around 120k miles, and the engine runs incredibly well, aside from this one recent anomaly. I ordered a replacement sensor, from Pelican Parts which arrived the next day (very impressive service) :lo
    1 point
  13. The following is a do it yourself procedure for replacing the thermostat on a 09 Cayenne S. The change out is straight forward and took me around 4-5 hours. One word of advice, the thermostat housing does not have to be removed to remove the thermostat. I thought it did and wasted a bunch of time removing other components to remove the housing before I realized it wasn’t necessary. The thermostat is removed easily after the water pump is removed. The parts were purchased from Sunset Porsche who were fantastic in getting the parts to me overnight. As always thanks to Loren for his advice.
    1 point
  14. Finally got around to this and took some pics for future reference. The procedure is a bit different for the 92A than the 9PA, at least the 2013 model year. I suspect it is the same for the 2011 and 2012 model years as well. First, their is only one screw to remove, using a T2 Torex wrench. It in the front, middle of the panel. You need a panel pry tool or strong fingers to release the front catches that are still holding it in place. Slip the tool between the panel and the glove box at one end to get the snaps to release. The end at the firewall is held in place with two rubber fingers that
    1 point
  15. Tools needed: T20 Torx driver A few flat blades or knifes Soldering Iron Solder Solder wick or desolder tool Parts Needed: http://www.westfloridacomponents.com 1/4W 0.22 ohm Mini-Melf Resistor Beyschlag MMA0204-50AL0R22J - 6 IRFZ24NS FZ24NS HEXFET Power MOSFET International Rectifier - 2 Step 1: Remove Lower panel under drive side. One screw in the middle Step 2: Locate module closest to the center of the vehicle. Module will be installed SIDEWAYS next to the module that has 4 connector ports Step 3: Once module has been removed, use the screwdriver to loosen and eventually
    1 point
  16. I like pictures when I read a DIY, so I made these up to demonstrate what you are in for when you want to change your plugs. Use these pictures in conjunction with the writeup by ebaker...
    1 point
  17. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Images are for LHD cars - RHD cars will be on the opposite side. Parts you will need: 1 ea 996 571 219 03 Pollen Filter (Charcoal activated filter) Tools you will need: T25 Torx drive Remove T25 Torx screw that holds the panel cover in place (passenger side front trunk). Remove the panel cover. Remove the particle filter upwards and out of the housing guide. Insert a new particle filter into the housing guide.
    1 point
  18. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. A third (center) radiator is standard on the Porsche GT3, Boxster S and all Carrera's or Boxster's with Tiptronic transmission. As well, the third radiator is now standard on all X51 Carrera Power Kit (engine power upgrade). Although the Tiptronic radiators are plumbed differently it is obvious that Porsche did this to increase the cooling capacity of these cars. Having great concern for my engine, specifically it's cooling in the hot California weather an
    1 point
  19. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Tools you will need: Crimping tool Soldering Iron Hot airgun (or hair dryer) Parts For MY99-MY01 use: 996.616.101.00 For MY02 and newer use: 996.616.141.00 Heat shrink tubing (fairly large) Electrical tape (optional) Note: The ballast resistor is available as a spare part and can be replaced by crimping it onto the old wires. 1. Disconnect the battery and cover the terminal or battery. 2. Unclip ballast resistor from the holder
    1 point
  20. This is a project I intended to do a few years back with my old Boxster, when the armrests started peeling, but I never got around to it. Lately, a couple of posts on PPBB got me thinking, and this time, doing. A few hours later and I am absolutely thrilled with this hack! I've taken those hard plastic covers which are pathetic as armrests, and turned them into something actually comfortable, 100% OEM-looking and matching the interior, and add a touch of class. I highly encourage you to try this hack! Time required: 2 hours Cost: About $20 Materials: Piece of leather to match your in
    1 point
  21. There have a been a few occurances of the cabrio top not fully completing the cycle, or simply refusing to open or close. If the hand brake light is on, very likely it is a low hydraulic fluid condition. The work below shows step by step how to add the fluid to the system. Tools needed: 5 mm allen wrench Flat screwdriver Children medicine syringe with small hose 1 Bottle of hydraulic fluid. Porsche is the recommended, I have used John Deere below with no problems after 4 weeks of filling: The steps for the process: 1. Open the top partially to the position shown 2. Pull t
    1 point
  22. The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397
    1 point
  23. Here are the pictures and instructions. This TSB is easy to do, and the range in my key remote went from 4 ft to 30 ft. 1999 996 Cabrio. Here are the tools you will need. The following steps: 1. Remove the sun visor. It simply pulls out 2. Use the small flat screw driver to pry of plastic cover on visor base. When removed, you will see the Hex bolt heads 3. Use the 4 mm Hex wrench key to remove both bolts. Hold on to the part, it has washers on the other side and can get fall off if not careful. 4. Now pull off the A-pillar cover to reveal the cables underneath. 5 Pull out th
    1 point
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