Jump to content

The RennTech.org community is Member supported!  Please consider an ANNUAL donation to help keep this site operating.
Click here to Donate

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/22/2019 in Tutorials

  1. This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time:
    3 points
  2. First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution will work but obviously the problem remains and at some point you may end up stranded if the ignitio
    2 points
  3. The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397
    2 points
  4. Cayenne route wire thru firewall2.pdf
    1 point
  5. I thought I would collect this for ease of use by forum members. Hope it helps with questions like 'when should I do this', or what kind of maintenance at xxxx miles. All of the below pertains only to B markets. Porsche organizes countries it sells its cars to, into markets, classified as A, B, or C. USA falls into the B market category, and since I reside there, below info will be only for B markets. If you live in other market, I am sure you can approximate durations, etc, but from what I see, there is language stating countries with leaded fuel do their maintenan
    1 point
  6. DIY tutorial to remove center console and replace stock shifter with a Numeric shifter. I completed this modification on my 2010 C4S. Center Console Removal and Shifter Replacement.pdf
    1 point
  7. I installed matching speed yellow seat belts today, and very happy with the result. (As usual, my stealer wants $300+ just for labor, but it turned out to be less than 20 mins job including taking pictures) It was easy enough, 3 bolts each side. 0. Here is my Christmas gift, colored seat belts. 1. Disconnect the battery! 2. remove side-lining panel 2-1. remove a small screw outside 2-2 & 2-3 there are two plastic bolt & hook, shake it a little to find them and pop them out. (a little different from 986) 3. There are 3 hex
    1 point
  8. One of the problems that I see with many 996/986/997/987 owners complaining about is a lumpy or erratic idle and sometimes sluggish acceleration. I have a quick cure for this problem. In fact, this cure will work for any car that has a throttle body. The issue is that over time a sludgy gunk will build up in the throttle body where the throttle butterfly opens and closes. This gunk will eventually change the airflow characteristics of the gap between the butterfly and the throttlebody which will cause the erratic idle. In addition, this gunk can cause the butterfly the stick as it op
    1 point
  9. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the ri
    1 point
  10. Becker radio sticky knob fix. I actually performed this fix on my radio knobs about 3 months ago, but did not want to post anything until I know it is capable of surviving the 90+ heat wave we get here in DC. Well the fix helded up with not degradation in the appearance, texture, and feel so here is what I did. (sorry no pics of the painting) 1. Remove knobs from the radio by pulling the knobs straight out 2. If the knob have been textured from prior attempts to clean the gummy dissolved rubber off the knobs, gently rub/press/massage the knob to remove/smooth as much of the
    1 point
  11. I recently replaced the coolant pipes in my car. I needed to do the job myself because there was simply no way I was going to shell out anywhere from $1500 to $3500 in labor to have it done by the dealership or an independent shop. Plus, having read about the job, I knew they would be tearing through a ton of stuff and I really feared the "oh, it also needs this" scam. I did a LOT of research on the various forums before undertaking this job. Reading and printing out anything I thought was useful information. I would highly encourage anyone reading this to do the same. Fortunately, I
    1 point
  12. It seems that there are more and more cases of these faults appearing, and as some of our cars are reaching 10-12 years old, it is hardly surprising. I've compiled this information from past personal experience on both of my 996s, reading about others on here and other forums, referring to the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, and applying some logic. Hopefully you might find it useful, and save some grief when troubleshooting. DOOR MICROSWITCHES There are seven microswitches in each door which control the alarm system. Two are separate switches: a] One on the outside do
    1 point
  13. These rubber "accordians" can crack over time. Fortunately the rubber piece is only around $60, and can be replaced easily. You'll need to set aside about an hour and a half if you haven't done this before. Tools needed: Flat-bladed screwdriver 4mm allen wrench Ratchet with short extension and 10mm socket Parts needed: The bellows Two plastic expanding fasteners (might come with the bellows) First, deploy your spoiler manually, and shut off the ingnition. No need to disconnect the battery. You will see, along the rear edge, four caps, as seen below.
    1 point
  14. Symptom: CEL light comes on and when investigated, P0492 code (or similar) is detected. The following code description is observed in Durametric SW: Secondary Air Injection System Bank 2 - Value below lower limit value, test conditions are not-completed, fault is currently active and causing a DTC lightWhat is wrong:From my experience and from others' posts, this is usually caused by the failure of the secondary air pump that is located inside engine compartment (the two horn like structures on either side of the bay, near the firewall).The failure is apparently caused by the valve gett
    1 point
  15. Removing and installing drive belt - Cayenne Turbo Removal 1. Remove the front engine compartment cover. 2. Pull the cover of the throttle body vertically upwards. 3. Pull off the electrical plugs on the throttle adjuster 1 and unclip the cable. Then pull off the plug on the boost pressure sensor 2. Twist the two fastening bolts 3 through approx. ca. 45° in an counter-clockwise direction and pull out the bolts. 4. Loosen the hose clamps to the left and right on the bellows and pull off the bellows. 5. Pull off the Y pipe from the throttle body an
    1 point
  16. This is most probably caused by your heat shields over the catalytic converters. They get rusty and the fixings cannot work properly. I was surprised how much the heat shields (£84 for two) and then the fixings cost (£30 for two sets) so I decided to try a DIY fix. So far this has worked perfectly! You may find that the heat shields look like this: You may have some good holes/fixings left but some rusted holes and no fixings. I used some aluminium sheet which I cut in a square then pushed into shape and then used "Fire putty" to hold in place and four "pop-rivets" so that i
    1 point
  17. The following is a do it yourself procedure for replacing the thermostat on a 09 Cayenne S. The change out is straight forward and took me around 4-5 hours. One word of advice, the thermostat housing does not have to be removed to remove the thermostat. I thought it did and wasted a bunch of time removing other components to remove the housing before I realized it wasn’t necessary. The thermostat is removed easily after the water pump is removed. The parts were purchased from Sunset Porsche who were fantastic in getting the parts to me overnight. As always thanks to Loren for his advice.
    1 point
  18. Finally got around to this and took some pics for future reference. The procedure is a bit different for the 92A than the 9PA, at least the 2013 model year. I suspect it is the same for the 2011 and 2012 model years as well. First, their is only one screw to remove, using a T2 Torex wrench. It in the front, middle of the panel. You need a panel pry tool or strong fingers to release the front catches that are still holding it in place. Slip the tool between the panel and the glove box at one end to get the snaps to release. The end at the firewall is held in place with two rubber fingers that
    1 point
  19. Tools needed: T20 Torx driver A few flat blades or knifes Soldering Iron Solder Solder wick or desolder tool Parts Needed: http://www.westfloridacomponents.com 1/4W 0.22 ohm Mini-Melf Resistor Beyschlag MMA0204-50AL0R22J - 6 IRFZ24NS FZ24NS HEXFET Power MOSFET International Rectifier - 2 Step 1: Remove Lower panel under drive side. One screw in the middle Step 2: Locate module closest to the center of the vehicle. Module will be installed SIDEWAYS next to the module that has 4 connector ports Step 3: Once module has been removed, use the screwdriver to loosen and eventually
    1 point
  20. I had heard this urban legend that you can repair door dings and dents by rubbing dry ice over the dent and then heating it with a hair dryer or heat gun. It seemed simple enough, so I decided to try it on the wife's urban assault vehicle which has its fair share of door dings. I went over to our neighborhood grocery store and got 2 pounds of dry ice for $3. Here is the what the test door looked like before the test. Essentially the process is to take some dry ice (while wearing gloves, as it is very, very cold), and simply run the dry ice back and forth over the dent until the metal has c
    1 point
  21. I like pictures when I read a DIY, so I made these up to demonstrate what you are in for when you want to change your plugs. Use these pictures in conjunction with the writeup by ebaker...
    1 point
  22. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Images are for LHD cars - RHD cars will be on the opposite side. Parts you will need: 1 ea 996 571 219 03 Pollen Filter (Charcoal activated filter) Tools you will need: T25 Torx drive Remove T25 Torx screw that holds the panel cover in place (passenger side front trunk). Remove the panel cover. Remove the particle filter upwards and out of the housing guide. Insert a new particle filter into the housing guide.
    1 point
  23. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. A third (center) radiator is standard on the Porsche GT3, Boxster S and all Carrera's or Boxster's with Tiptronic transmission. As well, the third radiator is now standard on all X51 Carrera Power Kit (engine power upgrade). Although the Tiptronic radiators are plumbed differently it is obvious that Porsche did this to increase the cooling capacity of these cars. Having great concern for my engine, specifically it's cooling in the hot California weather an
    1 point
  24. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. Tools you will need: Crimping tool Soldering Iron Hot airgun (or hair dryer) Parts For MY99-MY01 use: 996.616.101.00 For MY02 and newer use: 996.616.141.00 Heat shrink tubing (fairly large) Electrical tape (optional) Note: The ballast resistor is available as a spare part and can be replaced by crimping it onto the old wires. 1. Disconnect the battery and cover the terminal or battery. 2. Unclip ballast resistor from the holder
    1 point
  25. This is a project I intended to do a few years back with my old Boxster, when the armrests started peeling, but I never got around to it. Lately, a couple of posts on PPBB got me thinking, and this time, doing. A few hours later and I am absolutely thrilled with this hack! I've taken those hard plastic covers which are pathetic as armrests, and turned them into something actually comfortable, 100% OEM-looking and matching the interior, and add a touch of class. I highly encourage you to try this hack! Time required: 2 hours Cost: About $20 Materials: Piece of leather to match your in
    1 point
  26. Ok guys, you've been waiting for this, and as promised, here is my brief, but descriptive walkthrough. this is what you will need as the following: Porsche Panel wedge tool Screw Driver w/ T-20 bit and Flat head bit Turbo Instrument Cluster strong fingers! Ok with that cleared away, here is the first step. Remove the black plastic gauge cover above the gauges. Use the wedge tool or , in this case I used my fingers! (don't use the fingers, i highly recomend not to , it hurts hahahah). Remember , you will need to apply gentle but enough pressure to detach the tabs off from the top
    1 point
  27. Here are the pictures and instructions. This TSB is easy to do, and the range in my key remote went from 4 ft to 30 ft. 1999 996 Cabrio. Here are the tools you will need. The following steps: 1. Remove the sun visor. It simply pulls out 2. Use the small flat screw driver to pry of plastic cover on visor base. When removed, you will see the Hex bolt heads 3. Use the 4 mm Hex wrench key to remove both bolts. Hold on to the part, it has washers on the other side and can get fall off if not careful. 4. Now pull off the A-pillar cover to reveal the cables underneath. 5 Pull out th
    1 point
  • RennTech.org Store at Amazon.com



  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.