Jump to content

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Recommended Posts

Rear Wheel Bearing 102


This is a continuation from the front wheel bearing change. That was good practice for the rear of your car. Although i thought the rear was more difficult than the front but after i was done and found a couple of tricks that i will share, it might actually be easier. Having the right tools always make things go smoother. The B90-P2 tool i bought at http://www.samstagsales.com/Porsche.htm#axle Took only 3 days to get it. I was away at work for 4 days so the timing was perfect. Great service

 

Edited by seafeye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the long break....here is the rest...

Next we are off to remove the brakes.

Really simple. With just a few tools.

I like to remove the 2 phillops screws on the brake rotor first, while the brake pads are holding the rotor from spinning. They could be tight so use the proper screwdriver and use a lot of pressure while turning.

Next disconnect the brake wear sensors and the securing clip or cotter pin. Using needle nose plyers.

Use your punch and tap out the pin that holds the spring (Doesn't look like a spring but it does hold energy)

There are two 10mm bolts that need to be removed. One is holding the brake line to the carrier the other hold the ABS Sensor and the brake wear sensor. Undo both these and don't lose the bolts.

With a cloth wraped around some channel lock plyers, squeeze the pads towards the outside to compress the brake pistons. Now undo the brake caliper bolts that secure the caliper to the wheel carrier. Get your bungi cord or tie wrap or why and secure the caliper out of the way.

Release the parking break if you have not yet done so.

Pull the rotor off and set all the brake parts in one area.

First picture is of the caliper out of the way.

Second in the top right is the brake line bracket disconnected from carrier.

Third is ABS sensor hanging around.

post-16847-1193703305_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193703328_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193703363_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so everyone is clear on what parts are named what i will list what i call them.

They might be different than what you think they are but remember i am Canadian. We drink Beer. Sometimes too much.

1. Wheel Carrier

2. Wheel Bearing

3. Dust Cover

7. Wheel Hub

8. Control Arm

9. Lower Control Arm

12. Escentric Bolt

17. Track Rod

Now i know that you all have been calling the Control Arm the track arm but i have just taken this from a parts diagram.

http://dcauto.gotdns.com/catalog/index.php...amp;illo=501-00

post-16847-1193703768_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So now we are going to take apart the ball joint on the track arm.

Use a 17mm wrench (I think) and a torx socket on a ratchet to take the bolt off. You must hold the torx steady while you undo the bolt.

Search around this board and you will see lots of links for Ball Joint Seperator.

There are a couple of tools available just be carefull not the damage the rubber portion, or anything for that matter.

Press the tool and voila the ball joint comes apart. Very little effort should be needed here.

Good time to undo the sway bar as well. Just the bottom is all that is needed. 15mm and 17mm.

Once that is broken you can go ahead and mark the escentric bolt on the lower control arm. Hopefully we can get all this back together without having to go to the local alignment shop. So mark it and start to undo the bolt.

If i remember correctly, 19mm one side and 18mm on the other.

This is where my language turned for the worse. yet again.

The bolt can be a bugger to get out. Try with a pry bar under the control arm and try to take pressure off the bolt. Best bet is to have a buddy to push on the wheel carrier to release the pressure and take the bolt out.

Now for the trick i wished i had earlier.

The axel has been in the car for some time. Maybe you have no idea if it has ever been out since the birth of your car. Nevertheless it is going to be a _____ to get out. But this worked for me and i hope it will for you.

I was pulling and pulling on the wheel carrier hoping to get the axel to slide out of its home. But it just wouldn't.

I eventually resorted to my trusty hammer.

A couple of medium taps. As i get more frustrated the hits become harder. Be carefull.

It just popped out. Just like that. Simple. The rest is downhill. (Or so i thought).

post-16847-1193704621_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704633_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704656_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704668_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704683_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704694_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704711_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704721_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704756_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193704771_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought i had some pictures of me pulling out the axel but i don't sorry. I am sure that you get the idea. Couple of wacks and the whole wheel carrier is able to move freely.

You may notice is some pictures to follow that i took off the Control arm...(Track Arm) to some. Number 8. You don't have to. I did because i was too afraid to use some force on the axel. Don't hit it so hard that you bust your transmission but enought to free it. Also if you want to remove the Number 8, you will need a 21mm wrench. I didn't have one that big so it gave me a good excuse to go to sears and buy the Large Wrench Set for $59.00 (On sale). Did i mention my wife is away this week? heh heh

If you look at the parts diagram you will see that the number 8 can't interfere with the lower control arm coming out of its home.

With the axel out of the wheel carrier you can now turn to your SIR TOOLS kit. In the instructions it says that you can rest the horseshoe portion on the parking brake shoes. Hmmm, doesn't seem like a good idea till you think about all the extra work required to remove the brake shoes. Well if the instructions say it's OK...

First picture is the hub right after it came off the car still wrapped in the removal tool. Look closely and you can see the bearing race.

Bearing looks kinda dry huh? No scoring but so dry i can hear the noise.

Next picture is the axel out beside the wheel hub. You can also see some area's of where the tool rested against the brake shoes.

post-16847-1193705567_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193705689_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193705701_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193705721_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This going to the tool store kinda reminds me of how i convince my wife i need a new tool. Her grandfather was a tool guy. Real men have tools. And he was a real man. My wife really looked up to this man and has great respect for him. Now i am not one for taking advantage of an opportunity but...

I ask my wife questions about this great man, and more about his tools. "Did he have an aircompressor?" Yes, then it was OK for me to get one. One day we went to sears and looking around i noticed some vises. Showed her one that i wanted to buy. She said that her grandfather had a much bigger one and i should too. Gotta love this girl! I guess what i am trying to say is that buy as many tools as you can. You may be helping your future Grand Son in Law.

Here i am using the Sir Tools puller to remove whats left of the bearing. Two people would be nice. But with some effort you can get it done with one.

After you get it out, use some brake cleaner, but not much, can't be good for the planet earth, and clean out the carrier. You may have noticed that when i did the front i polished and cleaned the wheel carrier. I wasn't in the cleaning mood this time.

Reinstall the wheel bearing reversing the tool, should slide in, if it doesn't then it might not be lined up properly. I did keep the wheel bearings in the freezer for a while to help "Shrink" them. Might of helped i have no idea. Whats for dinner...Omaha steaks or wheel bearings?

After install of wheel bearing, attach the dust cover and bolts, use some anti seize on the bolts and torque.

post-16847-1193706450_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706458_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706466_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706483_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706492_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706501_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706508_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193706515_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You probably quessed that next is the replacement of the wheel hub and axel. Couple of tricks here too.

Use the SIR TOOL to press in the hub. Easy enough.

Then loosely put the axel in the hole. I say loosely because you have to place the lower control arm back in its place. And it is a lot easier if all parts aren't tight.

So put the axel as far into the hole as you can.

Move the lower control arm into place. Put some WD 40 or soap or something to help the control arm back in. Mine actually wasn't all that tough. I think i got lucky. Just wiggle the whole assembly and it should fit nicely.

I put a large phillops screwdriver in the hole to line up for the escentric bolt. You can attach the axel bolt at this time. Doesn't need to be tight.

Take the screwdriver out and wiggle the whole unit again to get the bolt in. Next the washer (Can only go on one way) then the bolt.

Now take the ball joint you disconnected earlier and reattach it. Sould be straight forward.

Here is also a picture of the parking brake line i broke. It was rusted, but i am sure with my yanking and pulling i must have pushed it over the edge. Nevertheless the brake still works. I live in florida and we don't get much rust. I wonder what the northerners cars look like? Sounds like the next project.

post-16847-1193707217_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707227_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707240_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707256_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707272_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707280_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707295_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707302_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707322_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707330_thumb.jpg

Edited by seafeye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the above post you also saw that the number 8 was reattached. Forgot to mention that.

After you have attached all the bolts, ball joint, number 8, you can tighten them up and torque to whatever settings your manual states. I understand that the boxster S has different settings so check to see what yours are. VERY IMPORTANT.

With the escentric bolt on the lower control arm you need to turn the bolt to the position that you marked earlier. Then once you have the spot, tighten the bolt. You kinda have to balance the two in order for the washer to stay in the position you want. Just take your time.

When all the bolts have been torqued you can put a jack on the bottom of the wheel carrier and jack up the car till the bolts for the sway bar line up. 17mm and 15mm here.

Finally its coming to an end...

Find your rotor you took off earlier, clean off the screws, plenty of antiseize and reinstall.

Same with the brake caliper bolts, those 2 10mm bolts that hold on the wires. Make sure the wires are routed properly around the sway bar. Replace the brake pads, pin, spring etc...

post-16847-1193707812_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707820_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707853_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707860_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707868_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707874_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707880_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193707887_thumb.jpg

Edited by seafeye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lastly or finally....

Replace the wheel, use your tool in the factory supplied kit.

Lower the car, torque the wheel bolts to 96 foot pounds.

And tighen the wheel hub bolt to 360 foot pounds. WHAT you don't have a torque wrench that goes that high? I don't either.

And i am not going to spend $250 to buy one either. So what i did was tightened the bolt as tight as i could with my 4 foot bar and then on my road test i stopped by the sears auto center and got them to do all 4 for me. I just gave the guy $10 to do it.

Enjoy your savings....I wonder what you will buy with the money you saved? I already spent mine on what else...tools!

post-16847-1193708175_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193708182_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193708190_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lastly or finally....

Replace the wheel, use your tool in the factory supplied kit.

Lower the car, torque the wheel bolts to 96 foot pounds.

And tighen the wheel hub bolt to 360 foot pounds. WHAT you don't have a torque wrench that goes that high? I don't either.

And i am not going to spend $250 to buy one either. So what i did was tightened the bolt as tight as i could with my 4 foot bar and then on my road test i stopped by the sears auto center and got them to do all 4 for me. I just gave the guy $10 to do it.

Enjoy your savings....I wonder what you will buy with the money you saved? I already spent mine on what else...tools!

Seafeye:

Excellent write up and great photos. Thanks for going to the trouble of writing it all up. It will give lots of us the extra little push to do the DYI.

Regards, Maurice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The drivers side of the car only took 2.5 hrs. One person. Could of had it down to 2 but i buggered up some threads on the ball joint getting it apart. I wasn't carefull enough, and the tool carved up the first two threads. I didn't have a rethread kit so i just used a small file and worked it a bit. All is well it was just at the top and the bolt goes past it.

I figured the last post here should be all the tools required to do the rear wheel bearings.

It may seem like a lot but i'm sure with a little ingenuity you can reduce it.

All the tools required for your boxster or 911 should be metric. But you will need some standard ones for the SIR TOOL bearing remover and ball joint breaker. If you are doing the front you will need these tools plus the spring compressor for the strut.

1/4" Ratchet

1/2" Ratchet

3/4" Ratchet

3/4" Thumb Ratchet (Really not needed at all)

1/2" Breaker Bar

Short 1/4" extension

Short 1/2" extension

Short 3/4" extension

Reducer from 3/4" to 1/2" (Used on my larger torque wrench for the caliper bolts)

T40 Torx Socket 1/2" Drive

5mm allen socket 1/2" Drive

10mm allen socket 1/2" Drive

10mm socket 1/4" Drive

13mm Socket 1/2" Drive

13mm Socket 3/4" Drive

17mm Socket 3/4 Drive

18mm Socket 3/4 Drive

19mm Socket 3/4 Drive

32mm Socket 3/4 Drive

1/2" Socket 3/4 Drive

5/8" Socket 3/4 Drive

3/4" Socket 3/4 Drive

15/16" Socket 3/4 Drive

1/2" Torque wrench

3/4" Torque wrench

4 foot bar

Hammer

Small punch for taking the pin that holds the brake pads.

Chisel that was used to help take off the bearing race on hub.

Vice grip

Needle nose plyers

Bungi cord

Sharpie Marker

Magnet to catch those bolts that fall out of your arms reach.

Wire brush

Medium phillops screwdriver

Large Phillops screwdriver

Flat head screwdriver

Of course your two tools from your factory tool kit..

Wheel liner upper

and

the wheel lock key.

Misc...

Grease

Brake cleaner

Hand Cleaner

Anit seize

and most important get yourself some good gloves. Your hands will appreciate the comfort.

post-16847-1193772296_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193772352_thumb.jpg

post-16847-1193772660_thumb.jpg

Edited by seafeye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the write-ups!

How long did it take you for each bearing? (esp. the part from rotor off to rotor back on.)

Thanks again!

Toby

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the write-ups!

How long did it take you for each bearing? (esp. the part from rotor off to rotor back on.)

Thanks again!

Toby

First one took almost 8 or 9 hrs. I couldn't figure out how to get the axel out of the wheel carrier. Then i hit it with a hammer and loosened it. Last resort worked.

The other side took only 2.5hrs start to finish. Thats including taking pictures. And working by myself. Certainly having 2 people would make things go easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome write up!

Wish you were local.

Thanks for the write-ups!

How long did it take you for each bearing? (esp. the part from rotor off to rotor back on.)

Thanks again!

Toby

First one took almost 8 or 9 hrs. I couldn't figure out how to get the axel out of the wheel carrier. Then i hit it with a hammer and loosened it. Last resort worked.

The other side took only 2.5hrs start to finish. Thats including taking pictures. And working by myself. Certainly having 2 people would make things go easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awesome write up!

Wish you were local.

Thanks for the write-ups!

How long did it take you for each bearing? (esp. the part from rotor off to rotor back on.)

Thanks again!

Toby

First one took almost 8 or 9 hrs. I couldn't figure out how to get the axel out of the wheel carrier. Then i hit it with a hammer and loosened it. Last resort worked.

The other side took only 2.5hrs start to finish. Thats including taking pictures. And working by myself. Certainly having 2 people would make things go easier.

Put your Location into profile so folks can see where "local" is.

We do a Work On Cars Days in few areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awesome write up!

Wish you were local.

Put your Location into profile so folks can see where "local" is.

We do a Work On Cars Days in few areas.

Thanks for the reminder. I thought I had it in there. Just updated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awesome write up!

Wish you were local.

Glad you liked it. Hope it was helpful. If you have a specific project just ask. :) :renntech:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question, if you don't want to spend the 200+ dollars on the tool, can it be disassembled enough to take the carrier to

a shop and have them press out the old bearing and press in the new. Seems to simple to work but had to ask.

Thanks

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question, if you don't want to spend the 200+ dollars on the tool, can it be disassembled enough to take the carrier to

a shop and have them press out the old bearing and press in the new. Seems to simple to work but had to ask.

Thanks

Rick

Yes, you can. That is what I do. Ironically, I have the tool, but I added permanent studs to replace the lug bolts, and they are too long for the tool to work...(My 986S is a race car and I kill a lot of bearings in a year)

You can pretty easily strip down to just the wheel carrier with the wheel hub still attached. The wheel carrier is the big aluminum piece to which all the suspension components are attached. You do not need to take the struts out = the wheel carrier will slip off the bottom of the strut if you get everything disconnected. You do need a ball joint seperator tool to get the control arms off.

My guy charges me $30 to press out the hub, then the bearing, press in a new bearing and then press in the hub. He does it while I wait. He does it with either a tool he made that is just like the SIR tool, or he uses a shop press with a bunch of attachments. I provide the part, just because I keep spares since it is a wear item for me.

On the rear, if you cannot get the axle to come out of the wheel hub, you can disconnect the axle from the gearbox and take the axle still sticking into the wheel carrier. A shop will be able to press out the axle easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question, if you don't want to spend the 200+ dollars on the tool, can it be disassembled enough to take the carrier to

a shop and have them press out the old bearing and press in the new. Seems to simple to work but had to ask.

Thanks

Rick

Yes, you can. That is what I do. Ironically, I have the tool, but I added permanent studs to replace the lug bolts, and they are too long for the tool to work...(My 986S is a race car and I kill a lot of bearings in a year)

You can pretty easily strip down to just the wheel carrier with the wheel hub still attached. The wheel carrier is the big aluminum piece to which all the suspension components are attached. You do not need to take the struts out = the wheel carrier will slip off the bottom of the strut if you get everything disconnected. You do need a ball joint seperator tool to get the control arms off.

My guy charges me $30 to press out the hub, then the bearing, press in a new bearing and then press in the hub. He does it while I wait. He does it with either a tool he made that is just like the SIR tool, or he uses a shop press with a bunch of attachments. I provide the part, just because I keep spares since it is a wear item for me.

On the rear, if you cannot get the axle to come out of the wheel hub, you can disconnect the axle from the gearbox and take the axle still sticking into the wheel carrier. A shop will be able to press out the axle easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing I forgot. Do you know the torque settings for all the nuts. I don't have a complete manual so no way of knowing.

Funny, they don't include them in the owners manual...ha.

Also if you would like, I would love to have your email address so if I run into a problem, I could ask you directly. I promise

not to bug you with every little thing, but may run into something major. So you don't have to post it here, mine is rwyma@att.net.

Thanks again,

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing I forgot. Do you know the torque settings for all the nuts. I don't have a complete manual so no way of knowing.

Funny, they don't include them in the owners manual...ha.

Also if you would like, I would love to have your email address so if I run into a problem, I could ask you directly. I promise

not to bug you with every little thing, but may run into something major. So you don't have to post it here, mine is rwyma@att.net.

Thanks again,

Rick

Happy to help. See email.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for such a complete presentation. I was wondering if you knew of anyone in the Carolinas that might rent the bearing pulling tools. I live in Spartanburg, SC. Don't mind the fee and also have my 944 I could leave as collateral. I don't mind a long drive. Thanks for any input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.