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00 C2 GT3 Sport Design Left Rear Wheel - One Stripped lug bolt


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One of 5 lug bolts on subject wheel spins merrily counter-clockwise (trying to unscrew it) but won't come off.

What is the best method to get it out?

I intend to take it to a tire shop (slowly) but I'm enquiring because I have no idea how they would remove it.

Once removed, what part needs to be replaced to fix this issue, in your opinion?

Thanks folks!

Martin

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I wish you were right. I didn't have any security log bolts and was actually in the process of replacing that lug bolt with one security bolt but I didn't get the chance to do that as it didn't want to come off.

Not sure where to go now but I'll find a way.

Thanks for the reply at any rate.

Martin

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  • Admin

You will likely have to have it cut off (without damaging the wheel). Once off the rotor will need to be inspected for thread damage - if it is damaged both rotors on that axle will need to be replaced.

So you are looking at wheel bolt(s) and possibly two rotors.

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Thank you!

I agree Loren that likely the rotor threads in that bolt hole are damaged and that both rotors (only about 7k km since last replaced) and a new bolt will be required ... but how can you cut the bolt with the wheel in place?

The bolt is wiggling in place and it is backed out by about 2 or 3 mm compared to the other bolts torqued in place, but even with needle nose plyers and trying to rotate it out, it just won't come out any further.

Very frustrating.

Martin

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I managed to drill the inside of the bolt close to a half inch past the collar of the bolt and once that was accomplished, I broke the head off with a large screw driver. Now I can remove the wheel and see what's next. Likely a new hub. I'll update once I know more.

Lesson learned: The drill exercise took me around 3 hrs or so, starting with a one-quarter-inch drill bit up to a half-inch in small increments. I had to hold the head with a long nose vise grip with my left hand as the bolt was not seized in the hub and could rotate freely. At close to half-inch, it got quite tough as the bit had a propensity for grabbing the interior wall and hence torquing the drill almost off my hand: tough on the old wrist. I used some cycling chain oil drops throughout and that seemed to help.

Boy, am I ever happy this is done.

On to next step! Will post!

Martin

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Definitely have to change the hub as a few threads are stripped in that bolt hole once I could remove the remainder of the bolt once the caliper and disk were set aside. Could try an insert but for a car of this capability, I would be much more comfortable with a new hub. That was I'll do!

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  • 3 weeks later...

To bring closure to this thread as it took a bit of time to get a 996 rear bearing to my area.

When you replace a hub flange on this car as I just found out, you have to sacrifice the bearing in the process as the inner bearing race comes out as the hub comes out. So it is a costly endeavour if one cross-threads one of the five bolt holes as this was my case. Although this was not my doing, I will certainly be very careful whenever I torque these wheel bolts in the future ... and it will always be done by hand.

At least, I should not have to worry about a noisy bearing on the left rear side of this car for a while.

Expensive lesson learned, indeed!

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  • 2 years later...

Loren:

 

Per your post above, at August 09, 2012 - 09:44 AM:

If a lug bolt hole is stripped, are you recommending replacing the rotors on both sides of the car, and replacing all the lug bolts?

 

When would one replace lug bolts in the normal course? if they get rusty, or just age?

Mine is a 1999 C4 with 177K happy miles which I've owned for the last 140K miles and 9 years.  Thanks in advance.

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Loren:

 

Per your post above, at August 09, 2012 - 09:44 AM:

If a lug bolt hole is stripped, are you recommending replacing the rotors on both sides of the car, and replacing all the lug bolts?

 

When would one replace lug bolts in the normal course? if they get rusty, or just age?

Mine is a 1999 C4 with 177K happy miles which I've owned for the last 140K miles and 9 years.  Thanks in advance.

 

I would say any external damage that might cause them to fail. A little external rust is usually only a cosmetic problem. Damage to threads would definitely be cause for replacement.

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I admire your tenacity.  This must have been a nightmare job. 

 

Sometimes with this sort of problem it is possible to get thread bite by pulling the bolt out and turning it so that it grips the next secure thread.  I notice you tried to do this with a pliers, which is very hard to do when the head of the lug bolt is within a wheel recess.  

 

I have heard of someone in a similar situation using epoxy to attach a socket to the head of the lug bolt and then pulling the lug bolt back to try and get thread purchase.   From that position it might be possible to unscrew it.  However, having got it out you still had to replace the flange.    

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I admire your tenacity.  This must have been a nightmare job. 

 

Sometimes with this sort of problem it is possible to get thread bite by pulling the bolt out and turning it so that it grips the next secure thread.  I notice you tried to do this with a pliers, which is very hard to do when the head of the lug bolt is within a wheel recess.  

 

I have heard of someone in a similar situation using epoxy to attach a socket to the head of the lug bolt and then pulling the lug bolt back to try and get thread purchase.   From that position it might be possible to unscrew it.  However, having got it out you still had to replace the flange.    

Neat, this proves that these old threads never die.

Tenacity it took for sure, eventhough it might not have been the smartest method I was aware of at the time, in time, it worked. Bearing and flange had to be replaced afterwards.

I tried to not damage the wheel in that process but it was very tough not to, while drilling the center of the bolt and holding the bolt with pliers.

Since that wheel had been curb-damaged already by the PO, I had it refinished in Vancouver for $250 during the winter.

I must say they did a superb job for that amount of money. It is still my best looking wheel to this day.

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