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Byron in Atlanta

Clicking from left rear on 996tt

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Hey guys....I have a clicking coming from the left rear at low speed. I can hear it best when idling to a stop. It does seem speed dependent as it is faster at faster speeds. It seems to go away under acceleration, but I cannot be sure as my exhaust is pretty loud. I jacked the car up and spun the rear wheels, but cannot hear the noise. There is some thumping from the transaxle, but not the same clicking. I checked the heat shield to make sure it was not hitting the rotor. I have taken the wheels off, and spun without the wheels and cannot hear it. I have taken the rear calipers off and removed the rotors to check the emergency brake. There is not a rub or anything obvious that I can see that is hitting or rubbing. I have even removed the center caps and that is not it. I cannot hear it when the weight is off the car. I can hear it when I push the car in neutral. The best way to describe the noise is that is sounds like an old fashioned speedometer cable that is about to break.

The car drives fine and everything else seems ok. There is no noticeable noise at highway speeds. Any help or advice would be appreciated!

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Thanks Loren. I couldn't find a stone. I haven't notice a roaring like you might expect from a wheel bearing. As for the CV's, the boots are clean and tight. Can the joint go bad with not visible indication? I expected a CV would click even when the car was jacked up. It only does it with weight on the car.

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Usually a CV will click (or slap) when rotated in opposite directions - this would indicate a lot of gap in the joint.

If it is more of a "whirring" sound then it is best to inspect the wheel bearing.

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